Bibliography: New Mexico (page 232 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Santa Fe. New Mexico State Dept. of Education, James A. Hale, L. Kathleen Winkles, Peggy L. Blackstone, Michael Glover, P.J. LEYENDECKER, PHILIP J. LEYENDECKER, Joe Sievert, Brenda Gallegos, and Washington American Educational Research Association.

LEYENDECKER, P.J. (1960). TOWN AND COUNTRY BUSINESS PROGRAM. (TITLE SUPPLIED). THESE 14 PAMPHLETS CONSTITUTE AN EXTENSION SERVICE PROGRAM OUTLINE FOR TEACHING A BUSINESS PROGRAM APPLICABLE TO RURAL YOUTH. THE CONTENTS INCLUDE BOTH A LEADER'S GUIDE AND AN EXTENSION WORKER'S GUIDE. THE REMAINDER OF THE PROGRAM DELVES INTO MARKETING, WHOLESALING, SALES AND SERVICES, STANDARDS AND GRADES OF PRODUCE, ASSEMBLY AND STORAGE, PROCESSING, TRANSPORTATION OF GOODS TO THE CONSUMER, PACKAGING, RETAILING, FINANCING, COUNTY PLANNING, AND FOOD SERVICES PERTAINING TO THE AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS.   [More]  Descriptors: Agricultural Education, Agricultural Production, Business Skills, Community Planning

New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. (1973). Guidelines for the Evaluation and Selection of Textbooks in the Treatment of Minorities (Especially in Social Studies). This document, part of which is in checklist form, sets forth a set of criteria for analyzing materials which are relevant for the education of minority groups. The checklist itself consists of 29 items, each of which must be judged on a scale ranging from "superior" to "not pertinent." Some sample evaluation questions are: (does the book) 1) include materials on minorities where relevant?; 2) reflect respect for personal and cultural differences and the worth and importance of the individual?; 3) give attention to holidays, festivals, religious observances of various minority groups without stereotyping? A list of six references is given. Descriptors: Check Lists, Ethnic Groups, Evaluation Criteria, Guidelines

Hale, James A. (1973). A Model Program for Training Personnel to Develop Solutions to Major Educational Problems in the Indian and Mexican-American Communities. Final Report. The program's objective was to train a cadre of research and development specialists with competencies to strengthen and institutionalize organizational assessment and program development within higher education institutions serving large numbers of Chicano and Native American students. The project's two major thrusts were: (1) project management and consortium arrangements and (2) articulation of curriculum objectives, content, and activities. Faculty members and administrators from 17 2-year and 4-year "developing" institutions of higher education located in the Southwestern United States participated. The research training program consisted of: (1) an entry skills diagnostic test administered prior to the start of formal instruction; (2) a formal academic training phase; and (3) a practicum or followup phase conducted at the parent institution and at the Educational Testing Service. Both "enroute" and terminal performance measures were used in the program's evaluation. Although the model was deficient along some lines, it proved to be useful in identifying the major dimensions of a training program. This report contains documentation of the program objectives, activities, and evaluation and the results of testing a transportable training model. External evaluator's reports (pre-post, comparative, and summative) are included in the form submitted.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Change Agents, Consortia, Educational Development

Diaz, Martha; Gallegos, Brenda (1979). Teaching ESL through Science: Third Grade Unit on Sound. This guide to science instruction for third grade students of English as a second language encourages teachers to develop curriculum materials related to specific subject areas in teaching communication skills to Spanish-speaking children. A series of concepts to be imparted in the classroom is presented. For each concept, learning objectives, central activities, teaching materials, classroom procedures, and evaluation criteria are described. The concepts revolve around sounds and the phenomenon of sound. Descriptors: Acoustics, Classroom Techniques, Content Area Reading, English (Second Language)

Gorman, William D.; And Others (1972). Projected Cropping Patterns, Livestock Enterprises, Processing Activities, Capital Requirements, Employment, Income, and Training Needs for Alternative Farm Organizational Structures for the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project. A Special Report to the Four Corners Regional Commission. Information on the expected cropping patterns, livestock enterprises, processing and related activities, income and employment opportunities, capital needs, and training requirements for alternative farm organizational structures that could be selected for development of the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project is presented in this report. The major issues discussed are farm organizational stature, development capital, educational and training requirements, development philosophy, and infrastructure planning. Descriptions of field crop and vegetable crop budgets, livestock production, expected crop and livestock combinations, capital requirements, employment created, training needs, and generation of income are also discussed in terms of the irrigation project. Conclusions in the areas of organizational arrangements, capital requirements, creation of employment and training opportunities, and generation of income are included with related recommendations. Also included are 67 tables and 2 conceptual models of organizational structure for the project.   [More]  Descriptors: Agricultural Production, American Indians, Capital, Employment Opportunities

Glover, Michael (1974). Record-Keeping and Checklists for Reading and Writing. Methods for Keeping Track of Individual Progress. Models of record keeping strategies for reading and writing are presented in this booklet. "Why Records Should Be Kept" discusses the importance and advantages of keeping accurate records of pupil progress; "Commercially Available Materials" lists many of the record systems available from commercial textbook publishers; "Record-Keeping for Teachers–Reading" lists a variety of sources for the specific skills a student needs and ways to test for them, presents a form for reporting a student's reading test scores, and lists the four levels of reading; "Record Keeping for Teachers–Writing" provides a list of writing skills; "Record-Keeping by Language Arts Areas" discusses how card files can be useful in maintaining student progress records and includes two sample cards; and "Uses of These Techniques in Other Areas" examines ways of transferring the record-keeping in the language arts to keeping records in other academic areas.   [More]  Descriptors: Elementary Education, Language Arts, Reading, Reading Skills

American Educational Research Association, Washington, DC. (1970). Cultural Stability and Change Among Mexican-American Families in an Urban Setting: A Comparison of Generations in El Paso, Texas. The El Paso study was directed toward the identification and analysis of cultural and social factors, their variation and magnitude among Spanish-speaking families and their school age children. The premise was that cultural and social variations do exist within as well as between social groupings. A stratified selection technique was employed to select schools for the study. A total of three distinct geographic areas were identified, and three schools from each were selected for the study. Student questionnaires and family interviews were used to obtain data. General conclusions were: (1) just over half of the mothers and fathers were born in the United States; (2) the population was stable; (3) families were large; and (4) education level was low. A major assumption was that an analysis of specific generations might reveal significant sub-group differences in cultural and social patterns. Students were therefore placed in one of four groups: (1) Mexican immigrant; (2) first generation Mexican-American; (3) second generation Mexican-American; and (4) American. Results showed that the greatest changes occur between immigrant children and third generation or more American families. Changes and trends toward acculturation were also evident in the three closely identified Mexican-American groups.   [More]  Descriptors: Acculturation, Bilingualism, Cultural Differences, Cultural Pluralism

New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. Southwest Regional Media Center for the Deaf. (1974). Teacher Recommended Materials for Use with Hearing Impaired Students. Intended for teachers of the deaf, the document provides a bibliography on instructional materials for aurally handicapped students from pre-primary to high school level. Materials for each age level are divided into eight categories: career education (adult level materials are also provided in this section); language; mathematics, reading; social studies, speech, auditory training, and speech reading; and total communication. Entries are listed alphabetically by title and include information such as title, format, level of use, reading level, and publisher. Also provided is a list of publishers' addresses. Descriptors: Articulation (Speech), Auditory Training, Bibliographies, Career Education

Sievert, Joe; Winkles, L. Kathleen (1974). Las Palomitas Preschool for the Handicapped. Guide. Presented is a curriculum guide for preschool children with cerebral palsy, severe speech and language difficulties, trainable and educable mental retardation, and emotional difficulties. Minimum specific objectives in the domains of social self-help, communications, and psychomotor development are color coded according to handicap. Suggested are sample activities correlated to the specific objectives. For example, to teach the child to kick a ball without falling (psychomotor objective 8), the following activities are suggested: "Holding the student's leg, move it forward as to kick the ball in front of him. Have a ball in front of you and one in front of the student. Try to get him to model you kicking the ball." The appendix lists 5 nonhandicapped curriculums and 33 further references.   [More]  Descriptors: Cerebral Palsy, Class Activities, Communication Skills, Curriculum Guides

LEYENDECKER, PHILIP J. (1961). LET'S DEMONSTRATE SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION FOR BETTER FARMING, BETTER LIVING. EIGHTEEN DEMONSTRATIONS ON THE SUBJECT OF SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION ARE PRESENTED. THESE DEMONSTRATIONS UTILIZE SIMPLE AND INEXPENSIVE EQUIPMENT AND ARE SUITABLE FOR CLASSROOM OR OTHER GROUP USE, ALTHOUGH THEY WERE DESIGNED FOR 4-H CLUBS. LISTED ARE THE EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS NEEDED, PREVIOUS PREPARATION, STEPS IN THE DEMONSTRATION, AND EXPECTED LEARNINGS.   [More]  Descriptors: Conservation Education, Demonstration Programs, Demonstrations (Educational), Experiments

New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. Evaluation, Assessment, and Testing Unit. (1974). Analysis of Standardized Testing Program Results 1973-74: Grades 1, 5, and 8 and ACT Report. This survey of the standardized testing program summarizes the data accumulated from the most recent administration of selected instruments in October 1973. It compares these findings with information from previous years and points to a few trends and possible conclusions. Assessment of mental abilities–1973-74 is presented for grade 1, and assessment of aptitude and achievement–1973-74 is presented for grades 5 and 8. The ACT report includes information on the four measures of academic ability and data about additional student characteristics that appear to have a bearing on success in college. The appendixes contain the testing schedule 1969-74 and item analysis for grades 5 and 8.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Comparative Analysis, Ethnic Groups, Grade 1

Lynch, Patrick D., Ed.; Blackstone, Peggy L., Ed. (1966). Institutional Roles for In-Service Education of School Administrators. This document is a compilation of papers read at a 4-day conference attended by 60 participants from throughout the United States. Chapters include (1) "In-Service Education of School Administrators: Background, Present Status, and Problems," by Robert B. Howsam; (2) "Notes on Institutional Relationships in the In-Service Education of the Professional Administrator," by Keith Goldhammer; (3) "Inter-Institutional Model for In-Service Training and Changes in School Systems," by Patrick D. Lynch; (4) "Continuing Medical Education," by Reginald Fitz; (5) "The Development and Implementation of a Residence Executive Development Training Program," by Simon Herman; (6) "Models for Change in School Systems: Reinforcement," by Robert J. Berger; (7) "In-Service Training of Industrial Management," by Robert Utter; and (8) "Psychological Processes in Influencing Change," by Stanley W. Caplan.   [More]  Descriptors: Administrator Education, Administrators, Educational Change, Inservice Education

BARNES, BILL; MANZANARES, JESS (1966). VOCATIONAL CORE PROGRAM. A 10-YEAR PROGRAM FOR DISADVANTAGED YOUTHS IS DESCRIBED. ITS OBJECTIVES WERE TO–(1) MEET THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS WHO HAVE NO INTEREST IN OR ABILITY TO ADAPT TO A REGULAR SCHOOL PROGRAM, (2) RELIEVE THE CLASSROOM TEACHER OF DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS WHICH BECOME TIME CONSUMING TO THE POINT THAT OTHER CLASS MEMBERS ARE PENALIZED, AND (3) ESTABLISH A FLEXIBLE SCHOOL PROGRAM WHICH INCLUDES ACTIVITIES BOTH IN AND OUT OF THE REGULAR SCHOOL DAY. CRITERIA FOR STUDENT SELECTION INCLUDED (1) POOR GENERAL ATTITUDE, (2) LACK OF INTEREST IN THE REGULAR CURRICULUM, (3) CHRONIC MISBEHAVIOR, (4) PETTY CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES, (5) INCORRIGIBLE TRUANCY, (6) INABILITY TO GET ALONG WITH OTHER PEOPLE, AND (7) DROPOUT POTENTIAL. SCHEDULING WAS DONE ON AN INDIVIDUAL BASIS BY THE VOCATIONAL CORE TEACHER. STUDENTS WERE ENCOURAGED TO PARTICIPATE IN A WORK EXPERIENCE PROGRAM AND TAKE COURSES WHICH THEY WANTED TO TAKE AND IN WHICH THEY MIGHT SUCCEED. THE PROGRAM OPERATES AT THE JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL. JUNIOR HIGH STUDENTS RECEIVED CREDIT AS RECOMMENDED BY THE VOCATIONAL CORE TEACHER AND AT THE SENIOR HIGH LEVEL, THE PRINCIPAL COOPERATED IN THIS RECOMMENDATION. THE STUDENT MAY TRANSFER TO THE REGULAR CURRICULUM AT WILL. EXTENSIVE INDIVIDUAL COUNSELING IS DONE BY THE VOCATIONAL CORE TEACHER.   [More]  Descriptors: Admission Criteria, Disadvantaged Youth, High School Students, High Schools

Church, Mary Josephine; And Others (1980). HIGH LONESOME: A School Community Survey of the Encino Rural Independent School District. An assessment of school facilities and services and a survey of staff, student, and community attitudes was undertaken at the request of the Encino School Board to aid in educational planning and improvement for its small rural school which is faced with the problems of declining population (from 400 to 150 in the past 20 years), declining enrollment (66 students in grades K-12), and rising costs. The following recommendations are based on a comprehensive assessment of facilities, services, and educational costs: (1) add a part-time principal or intern in educational administration to assist the superintendent-principal; (2) develop a variety of inservice teacher training programs; (3) use the PLATO system to increase the number of courses available and further individualize instruction; and (4) finance capital outlays to reduce the building area and modernize classrooms. Survey results indicate that faculty, students, and community members are concerned with the quality of local education but have positive attitudes about their school and want it to remain in operation. In addition to specific educational improvements, the community of Encino might consider plans to counteract the pervasive effects of declining population. The development of tourist related business is one of several possible ways to bring new residents as well as income to the area. Appendices include the survey questionnaires and bibliography. Descriptors: Declining Enrollment, Economic Development, Educational Facilities, Educational Improvement

Glover, Michael (1974). Quickie Tests for Reading: Fast, Simple Tests to Determine Reading Level. The reading test forms in this booklet are to be used primarily for determining students' reading grade level. In expanded forms, they can also serve as diagnostic tools for some reading and learning disabilities. All teachers should be able to administer these tests with relative accuracy and, when applicable, discover narrow areas which will require more comprehensive testing by a specialist. The tests discussed are commercially prepared informal reading inventories, the cloze procedure, and a sight word test. Information on preparing and on using the tests is provided.   [More]  Descriptors: Cloze Procedure, Elementary Education, Evaluation Methods, Informal Reading Inventories

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