Bibliography: New Mexico (page 229 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include George T. Prigmore, Chris Williams, Robert T. Divett, W. Wayne Jones, James A. Conway, Joseph M. Petrosko, William O. Wilson, Louis E. Saavedra, DARRELL S. WILLEY, and Philip L. Hosford.

Pettibone, Timothy J.; Solis, Enrique, Jr. (1973). Dental Health Care Models of Southwest Cultures. Final Report. The major goal of this research was the development and validation of cultural models of dental health practices. The specific objectives were to determine if 3 cultural groups (American Indians, Mexican Americans, and Anglo Americans) differ in the dental health hygiene indices, characteristics, psychological factors, or social factors; to develop explanatory models of dental health practices; and to cross validate the models. Two kinds of information were obtained–personal interviews and dental examinations. Data were collected during Spring 1972 for the first year phase and during Fall 1972 and Spring 1973 for the validation. The information was summarized and analyzed by descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, and path analysis. Six separate models were discussed and analyzed. It was found that similarities exist in the models developed across dimensions of ethnicity and residential groupings, and that financial factors and "symptomatic orientation toward dental care" were the greatest determinants of dental care behavior. Copies of the interview questionnaire and the dental examination form were included.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Anglo Americans, Cross Cultural Studies, Cultural Influences

Divett, Robert T.; Jones, W. Wayne (1969). Report on the Total System Computer Program for Medical Libraries. The objective of this project was to develop an integrated computer program for the total operations of a medical library including acquisitions, cataloging, circulation, reference, a computer catalog, serials controls, and current awareness services. The report describes two systems approaches: the batch system and the terminal system. The batch system is a combination of manual and machine processing of the clerical functions of a library. This particular system involves functions in the acquisitions, cataloging and circulation departments. The terminal system is an on-line computer system with terminals, in each section of the library, including reference services and patron use. It is designed to cover the total operations of a library. After a general description of both systems the report lists the equipment needed and the estimated costs for both. Recommendations are given for sharing the system with several other medical libraries. Technical descriptions of the terminal system, including file organization and program structure, are presented in the report. The appendices show library forms (order forms, catalog cards, etc.), 2260 screen displays, and source listings. Descriptors: Computer Programs, Information Systems, Library Networks, Library Technical Processes

Prigmore, George T. (1969). Factors Influencing the Role of Supervisors of English. To determine the duties of English supervisors and the effect of certain organizational factors upon them, a questionnaire was sent to 702 English language arts supervisors in 50 states. Replies were received from 354. An interpretation of the data provided a profile of the average English supervisor, a description of his position and its requirements, and an analysis of his duties and the time allotted to each. Organizational factors were found to have a definite influence upon the role behavior of incumbent supervisors. It was indicated that the educational organization expects supervisors to focus on change and evaluation of the curriculum and classroom instruction rather than on such activities as demonstration teaching and lobbying. (Tables and charts detailing questionnaire results are provided.)   [More]  Descriptors: Administrative Organization, Elementary Education, English Departments, English Instruction

Wilson, William O.; Saavedra, Louis E. (1967). Checklist of Educational Specifications. This document presents procedures and checklists for the development of educational specifications for all phases of a school building program. Areas include–(1) program of the proposed school, (2) the community to be served, (3) the site, (4) the nature of the school project, (5) the architect, (6) relationships of areas of the building, (7) electrical systems, (8) mechanical systems, (9) maintenance and custodial facilities, and (10) instructional and non-instructional areas.   [More]  Descriptors: Educational Facilities Design, Educational Specifications, Facility Guidelines, Facility Requirements

Conway, James A.; Dettre, John R. (). An Exploratory Study of the Relationships of Belief Systems, Goals, and the Evaluation of College Undergraduates. Because some researchers have suggested that dogmatism, or open or closed mindedness, on the part of faculty and students influences the marks students receive, this study aimed to determine the extent to which a congruence of teachers' and students' beliefs and goals is reflected in grades. To guide the investigation, a number of questions were put forth relating to whether teachers tend to prejudge students on the basis of compatibility with their personal values. Conducted at the State University of NY at Buffalo, questionnaires were administered to 792 students pursuing a preparatory program to teach on the elementary and secondary level and 26 of their teachers. Rokeach's Dogmatism Scale and an adaptation of the life goals from Getzels and Jackson were used. At mid-semester, faculty also completed another questionnaire asking them to rank their students as above average, average, or below average without reference to grade books or other sources. The findings were first that open and closed minded students taught by open and closed minded teachers did not receive a significantly different grade distribution. Second, students who shared the same goals as their teachers received about the same distribution of grades as those whose goals differed. Third, when beliefs AND goals correspond, grades tended to show a certain pattern. Grade discrimination only seems to appear when beliefs and goals are considered together. Class ranking did not seem to be influenced by mutual agreement on goals. Evidence indicated that class participation may be a deciding factor affecting faculty evaluation of students.   [More]  Descriptors: Attitudes, Beliefs, Class Average, Evaluation

Rosenfeld, Lawrence B. (1973). An Investigation of Teachers' Stereotyping Behavior: The Influence of Mode of Presentation, Ethnicity, and Social Class on Teachers' Evaluations of Students. This study sought to answer two questions: Do teachers stereotype students of different ethnic and social class backgrounds when using actual classroom evaluative criteria? What are the relative effects of audio and visual cues in eliciting teachers' stereotypes? Stimulus materials portraying students from different ethnic and social class backgrounds were presented to teacher subjects via three modes: audio, visual and audiovisual. Teachers evaluated students using a semantic differential constructed from a random sample of public school teachers' criteria for student evaluation. A three-way analysis of variance for repeated measures was employed to test for any significant main effects for ethnicity, social class, and presentation mode and for possible interaction effects among these independent variables. The results of this study confirm results from previous studies (surveyed in this paper) which showed that teachers stereotype on the basis of ethnic and social class cues. They also confirm earlier findings that ethnic and social class cues are transmitted through both the audio and visual modes and that the audio mode provides more information for making judgments. The study extends previous findings to the classroom and confirms their applicability to teachers' evaluations of students on classroom criteria. (The final instrument used in the study appears among the appendices. A bibliography is included.)   [More]  Descriptors: Anglo Americans, Auditory Stimuli, Blacks, Mexican Americans

Little, James A., Ed. (1970). Answers. Prepared for parents of deaf children, the text is a compilation of papers and research prepared by both the deaf and hearing concerned with the deaf child. Articles by parents recounting personal experiences are featured. Papers by specialists and teachers dealing with such topics as the psychology of deaf education and total communication with the preschool deaf child, speech, speechreading and auditory training, and audiological aspects of deafness are addressed to the parent. Descriptors: Auditory Training, Communication Problems, Deafness, Early Childhood Education

WILLEY, DARRELL S. (1967). AN INTERDISCIPLINARY INSTITUTE FOR THE IN-SERVICE TRAINING OF TEACHERS AND OTHER SCHOOL PERSONNEL TO ACCELERATE THE SCHOOL ACCEPTANCE OF INDIAN, NEGRO, AND SPANISH-SPEAKING PUPILS OF THE SOUTHWEST. INTERIM REPORT NUMBER 3. THIS THIRD REPORT IN A SERIES OF FOUR IS CONCERNED WITH AN EXPLORATORY ASSESSMENT OF THE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY OFFERED BY SCHOOL SYSTEMS SERVING TWO MULTICULTURAL COMMUNITIES. ONE SYSTEM HAS A PUPIL POPULATION OF APPROXIMATELY 1,500 OF WHICH 85 PER CENT ARE ANGLO, 10 PER CENT ARE INDIAN, AND 5 PER CENT ARE SPANISH-AMERICAN. THE OTHER SYSTEM HAS A PUPIL POPULATION OF APPROXIMATELY 1,700, OF WHICH 40 PER CENT ARE ANGLO, 45 PER CENT ARE SPANISH-AMERICAN, AND 15 PER CENT ARE INDIAN. PUPIL PERFORMANCE WAS MEASURED BY EVALUATING ABILITY TESTS, ACHIEVEMENT TESTS, ASSIGNED GRADES, AND ATTENDANCE AS REPORTED IN THE CUMULATIVE RECORDS. THESE PERFORMANCE MEASURES ARE PRESENTED BY ETHNIC GROUPS AND BY GRADE GROUPS. NO CONCLUSIONS ARE REPORTED.   [More]  Descriptors: Ability, Academic Achievement, American Indians, Anglo Americans

New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. American Indian Law Center. (1977). Training and Technical Assistance to Develop, Revise and Supplement Indian Tribal Codes and Court Procedures on Child Abuse and Neglect. Final Report. Chosen on the basis of geographic location, population, economic status, and land base size, 10 American Indian reservations received a 5-day training session and a 3-day follow-up session re: juvenile law as it pertains to child abuse and neglect. An American Indian Law Center staff attorney assisted by a law student conducted the training sessions which involved a combination of pre- and post-testing, lecture and discussion, slide presentations, extensive role playing, and use of a manual based on the Model Children's Code. The final day of the training session was devoted to instruction geared to the results of the post-test given on the fourth day. Each group was invited to decide the type of technical assistance the follow-up session would provide. Follow-up results varied from groups on the Rocky Boy's, Warm Springs, and Standing Rock reservations opting to write the first draft of a new juvenile code for their tribes to Fort Berthold's initiation of a new group called the Family Service Team whose objectives included providing counseling to children and parents on family problems, assisting police and social welfare personnel in securing crisis shelter placement, providing educational services, reporting suspected abuse and neglect, and preparing a resource directory. Evaluation of the training sessions suggested the 5 days should be changed to 3, the role playing was invaluable, the follow-up requires 2 trainers, and there should be additional training geared to specific groups (e.g., judges). Descriptors: American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Child Abuse, Child Neglect

New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. American Indian Law Center. (1976). Model Children's Code. The Model Children's Code was developed to provide a legally correct model code that American Indian tribes can use to enact children's codes that fulfill their legal, cultural and economic needs. Code sections cover the court system, jurisdiction, juvenile offender procedures, minor-in-need-of-care, and termination. Almost every Code section is supplemented with a commentary. Each comment section is divided into three subsections: law–reviews laws arising under the Indian Civil Rights Act that must be complied with by every tribe and cannot be omitted from the Code; purpose–reviews the section content and reasons for inclusion, and gives assistance in proper interpretation; and cross-reference–refers the reader to other Code sections that provide helpful information. Comment sections entitled "Law in State and Federal Courts" include only the law that is legally binding on state and Federal courts; "the law is not legally binding on tribal courts". These should not be confused with cases arising under the Indian Civil Rights Act which "are binding on tribal courts". Topics covered include: establishment, powers, duties, and authority of courts; children's court counselor, presenting officer, and guardian ad litem; original jurisdiction; transfer to adult tribal court; complaints, warrants, and custody; detention and shelter care; preliminary inquiry; investigation by the children's court counselor; the various hearings; pre-termination report and other reports. Descriptors: American Indians, Child Advocacy, Civil Liberties, Codification

Salas, Jean, Comp. (1973). Flander's System of Interaction: What Is It? Methods for the Teacher to Study His Teaching Behavior in Terms of the Behavioral Objectives He Has Established for Himself. This document presents in graphic form a system of interaction analysis, in which methods are presented for the teacher to study his teaching behavior in terms of the behavioral objectives he has established for himself. A summary of categories of interaction analysis is provided, which are labeled as indirect and direct influence. The former includes a teacher's acceptance of feelings, teacher's praise or encouragement, acceptance or use of students' ideas, and teacher's use of questions. The latter involves lectures, teacher's use of directions, criticism or justification of teacher authority, student-talk (response and initiation), and silence or confusion. Charts for plotting classroom interaction with examples used to illustrate student talk following teacher talk and teacher talk consisting of lectures are provided. Among areas identified to differentiate types of teacher response are: indirect teacher talk, direct teacher talk, student talk, silence or confusion, acceptance of feelings, offering praise, using student ideas, giving criticism, lengthy student responses, and teacher responding to termination of student talk with direct influence. That there is no single standard of what is best in assessing interaction is stressed.   [More]  Descriptors: Behavior Change, Behavior Patterns, Behavioral Objectives, Change Strategies

Hosford, Philip L.; Schroder, Angela (1974). Southwestern Leadership Conference on Performance-Based Education. The following objectives for the conference are indicated: a) to assist interested leaders from all educational levels and agencies to learn more about performance-based education (PBE) strategy: its nature, promise, and problems and its implications for preservice and in-service educational personnel development; b) to assist leaders from all levels to develop more effective ways to collaborate on designing and implementing PBE programs; and c) to assist operators of PBE or PBTE (performance-based teacher education) programs to upgrade the quality of their programs, particularly in the areas of management, research, and assessment. There are two major sections: "What was Said and Recommended" is a series of selected quotes from the participants of the conference and "The Meaning of It All" is a subjective commentary of the status and future of PBE. Also presented is a brief history of the development, rationale, and funding of the conference. Descriptors: Competency Based Teacher Education, Conferences, Educational Trends, Opinions

Williams, Chris (1973). Theatre Training Overseas. The booklet is a reference for those interested in theatrical training programs in other nations. It presents details about the history and philosophy, courses, working conditions, financing, repertory, and so on, of sixteen professional theatre schools or academies in nine nations: England, France, Italy, Sweden, West Germany, East Germany, Poland, Russia, and Japan. Extensive curricular content is specified for the Central School of Speech and Drama and the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (England), the Max Reinhart School (East Berlin), the State Higher School of the Theatre (Warsaw), and the Lunacharsky State Institute of Theatrical Art (Moscow).   [More]  Descriptors: Course Content, Dramatics, Educational Programs, International Programs

Williams, Richard P. (1968). Bibliography for Teaching Reading in the Secondary School. Included in this bibliography are books, monographs, dissertations, and journal articles of interest to secondary teachers concerned with reading instruction. The materials included in the 955 citations cover a period of publication from 1903 to 1967. Entries are divided into the following categories: (1) critical reading skills, (2) comprehension reading skills, (3) rate building skills, (4) functional reading skills, (5) word analysis skills, (6) appreciation skills, (7) reading in the content areas, (8) instructional materials and methods, (9) reading programs, (10) linguistics and the reading program, and (11) individualized programs. Subdivisions are made within the categories.   [More]  Descriptors: Bibliographies, Content Area Reading, Critical Reading, Functional Reading

Pettibone, Timothy J.; Petrosko, Joseph M. (1970). A Comparative Approach to Teaching World Cultures. An experiment was performed to test the effectiveness of a comparative approach of teaching world cultures to secondary school students. With the comparative approach, cross-cultural comparisons are employed rather than the traditional presentation of one culture at a time. It was hypothesized that students receiving a comparative curriculum would perform better than conventionally taught students on two indices. As expected, comparative students did perform significantly better on a test of course content. However, no effect upon cultural openmindedness of students occurred as a result of a comparative approach. Discussion centered on practical problems of implementing an innovative world cultures curriculum.   [More]  Descriptors: Area Studies, Comparative Analysis, Cross Cultural Studies, Cultural Awareness

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