Bibliography: New Mexico (page 227 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Robert A. Klein, Edgar M. Kugler, Melinda R. Smith, MARION GILBERT ASHCRAFT, David A. Sachs, James Kari, Bernard Spolsky, Joel E. Greene, Bruce R. Kohl, and Stephany S. Wilson.

New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. Navajo Reading Study. (1974). Training Teachers On-Site: The Spring Semester 1974 at Sanostee and Toadlena. Navajo Reading Study Progress Report No. 25. During the 1974 spring semester, the Sanostee-Toadlena Title VII Bilingual Education Project focused on "how and what to teach Navajo children". The on-site program included courses in human and growth development, classroom learning, production of materials, social studies, science methods, mathematics methods, developmental reading, and creative English. Trainees participated in class work with university professors and classroom and micro-teaching experiences in the two schools. Although the five professors presented various ideas of how to work with children, they basically focused on how children can best learn in school. The professors helped the trainees to: produce their own thinking and creative ideas in Navajo and English; see the value of a diagnostic approach to language acquisition and the need for greater word attack skills; examine and evaluate their own value system and to try to figure out what and how they wanted Navajo children to learn; and integrate the curriculum using social studies, science, and math. This report contains descriptions of the experience of those who taught at Sanostee and Toadlena during the semester. Virtually unedited, the various accounts give details thought to be significant by the professor. Also included are samples of the students' creative writing and their evaluations of the creative English class.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Bilingual Education, Creativity

Pleyte, Parrie S.; Kohl, Bruce R. (1972). Revenue and Expenditure Projections for the Albuquerque Public Schools. Final Report. This report is part of a 10-city national study of revenues and expenditures shared by a local government. The purpose of the study is to project operating revenues and expenditures of the Albuquerque public schools through 1975. The revenue projection includes all sources and uses various methods for estimating Federal, State, and local revenue. The expenditure estimate is based on (1) what is going to happen to average daily school membership, (2) to what extent the prices of educational goods and services will increase, and (3) how much it will cost to maintain the previous rate of quality improvement in the public schools. Descriptors: Budgets, Cost Estimates, Costs, Educational Finance

Smith, Melinda R., Ed.; And Others (1982). Law in U.S. History: A Teacher Resource Manual. By completing these self-contained, supplementary activities, secondary students will learn about important law-related issues and themes in American history. When students recognize the vital constitutional issues of different periods in history they are helped in understanding the social, political, and economic forces which shaped those periods. The activities are grouped into four sections roughly corresponding to the chronological periods of most U.S. history courses: Colonial Period through the Revolution; Growth of a New Nation; Civil War through Industrialization; and the Modern Era. Examples of activity topics include the Salem witch trials, freedom of the press in colonial America, colonial opinion on the eve of the Revolution, the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, slavery, labor recognition, child labor, the Supreme Court, Pentagon Papers, Watergate, and voting rights. Teaching methods include opinion polls/surveys, role plays, simulations, case studies, and mock trials. Each activity presents a description, lists objectives, recommends time allocations, and explains the procedures for using it.   [More]  Descriptors: Child Labor, Civil War (United States), Colonial History (United States), Constitutional Law

Greene, Joel E. (1965). Psycho-Social Adjustment in an Indian Boarding School, September 1, 1964 – August 31, 1965. Progress Report. The present short narrative report is a sequel to the more extensive introductory progress report of 1963-1964 (RC 003 073). Emphasis is placed on the increased number of case referrals and on better communication channels evidenced within the program. The inservice program with the dormitory counselors is shown to have been successful but greatly dependent on the personnel involved. Evaluation and research efforts are indicated and explanations of further efforts in this area are reported.   [More]  Descriptors: Adjustment Counselors, Adjustment (to Environment), Agency Cooperation, American Indians

Koehne, Fred W.; Wilson, Stephany S. (1972). Albuquerque Police Department, Race and Cultural Relations Training: Evaluation Report. Seminars conducted for 90 officers were evaluated by personal observation of the seminars in progress and by a comparison of seminar participants and nonparticipants. The evaluation revealed that the initial strong impact of the seminars tended to dissipate rather quickly over time. Other major findings were that seminar participants tended to perceive greater negativism, hostility, and dissatisfaction toward police among minority groups and other segments of the community and appeared more attuned to socioeconomic factors affecting the city's crime problems. Descriptors: Attitudes, Crime, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Influences

Klein, Robert A. (1973). Cognitive Growth in Young Children: Some Theoretical Implications Pertaining to Identity, Language and Memory. Language as an identifiable cognitive behavior must be studied in relation to identity and memory, all of whose structures undergo progressive changes as the child develops. The organization of the development of the organism depends upon relatively ordered structures of growth, following foreseeable pathways or creodes. The processes occurring within each creode, however, are susceptible to certain environmental modifications. Current research indicates that the acquisition of language parallels the development of identity and renders it meaningful. Research has shown that the style of reasoning used by a child is very much related to the language used and that a close relationship exists between the structure of a term and the developmental stages of seriation. Cognitive operations never exist in isolation; the acquisition of one enhances or potentiates the acquisition of another. Research has shown that the development of the memory schema lies within the developmental confines of identity and language. It is only under the circumstances of the changed and changing schema that memory becomes not more accurate but more in concert with the other same-level cognitions and modalities of thinking. The observation of qualitative differences of behavior at different chronological levels establishes memory as possessing the structure(s) through which identity is assimilated and language accommodated. Memory, and its manifestation via increasingly accurate reproduction of the original stimulus, is an integrative and integrated factor in cognitive growth.    [More]  Descriptors: Abstract Reasoning, Child Development, Cognitive Development, Language Acquisition

Kari, James; Spolsky, Bernard (1973). Trends in the Study of Athapaskan Language Maintenance and Bilingualism. Navajo Reading Study Progress Report No. 21. This report discusses trends in the study of Athapaskan, concentrating on language maintenance and bilingualism. It presents both the potential richness and the actual poverty of studies of sociolinguistic aspects of the Athapaskan languages. Noted are two trends–(1) There is a greater interest among linguists in the studies of language in use: studies of context, of diversity, and of the sociological aspects of language which are no longer considered uninteresting; and (2) There is evidence of an increasing sense of responsibility toward the speakers of American Indian languages. The report anticipates rapid advances in the study of Athapaskan language maintenance and bilingualism.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Languages, Bilingual Education, Bilingualism, Language Enrichment

Kugler, Edgar M. (). A Survey of Career Aspirations for Secondary School Students. Prior to the implementation of a career education program, a career aspirations survey was conducted in one New Mexican community. The sample population included first and second generation Mexican-American secondary school students. A six-item questionnaire was administered to 720 students from one junior and one senior high school. The results were categorized according to 15 occupational clusters. A composite of all six grade levels showed the most desired careers seem to be in the areas of health, business and office, public service, environment, and communications and media. Upper grade students were more specific about careers. The largest number of students undecided about a career are in the 12th grade and the smallest in the 7th grade. It appears that a large portion of the student population is not prepared to step into a career at graduation. In this community of relatively low economic status, the apparent need for a practical, realistic career education program is evident. Tables display the distribution of desired careers according to grade level, and the six-item questionnaire is appended.   [More]  Descriptors: Career Choice, Career Education, Economically Disadvantaged, Junior High Schools

Collier, Nina P.; And Others (1970). Guide to Performing Arts Programs in Elementary and Secondary Schools. Final Report. Artist-teachers, administrators, and other educators will find the elementary and secondary guidelines useful in formulating the objectives and methods of teaching the performing arts. The underlying assumption is that providing children with opportunities to observe, listen, and react to exciting performances leads to educational experiences, both affective and cognitive, which are of inestimable value. Three major parts emphasize the necessity for cooperation among educators, artists, administrators, and parents. Part one explains the principles, objectives, and philosophy of the programs and, further, offers some effects and evaluation of the theatre arts programs. Outstanding examples of selected programs are described in Part II. Although the emphasis is on music programs, other topics dealt with are drama, dance, pantomime, poetry, and puppetry. In Part III, practical suggestions are provided for implementing and using performing arts programs in the school. Information is given on how to design and build programs and on the role of school personnel and the school itself. Appendices include chapter supplements, sources, and selected bibliographies.   [More]  Descriptors: Affective Objectives, Cognitive Objectives, Dance, Drama

Taylor, Anne, Ed.; Muhlberger, Joe, Ed. (1998). Architecture and Children: Learning Environments and Design Education, MASS Magazine. This issue addresses (1) growing international interest in learning environments and their effects on behavior, and (2) design education, an integrated model for visual-spatial lifelong learning. It focuses on this new and emerging integrated field which integrates elements in education, new learning environment design, and the use of more two- and three-dimensional visual thinking as mainstream educational practices. Following an editorial introduction, the issue's articles are: (1) "Technology and Education" (George Lucas); (2) "Learning Is Being Alive" (Rina Swentzel); (3) "E Pluribus Unum: The New American Community School" (Steven Bingler); (4) "Environments for Children" (Dolf Schnebli); (5) "Beauty, Morality, Sunshine and Freedom" (George Anselevicius); (6) "A Case History of a Community School in Sendai, Japan" (Hiroko Hosoda); (7) "Lessons in High School Planning and Design" (C. William Brubaker); (8) "Ecology and Community" (Fritjof Capra); (9) "The Role of Designers in Design and Education" (Peter Edward Lowe and Phillip I. Nobel); and (10) "Physical Environments Do Affect Learning and Behavior of Students" (Anne Taylor). (Contains 23 references and a list of resources for learning environment design.) Descriptors: Architecture, Building Design, Building Innovation, Classroom Environment

Sachs, David A.; And Others (1971). Strengthening the Visual Perception of Deaf Children. Final Report. Learning sets programs were administered to preschool deaf children from a variety of representative educational programs throughout the southwest to improve their visual perception skills. The concept of learning sets was described as progression from trial-and-error learning to immediate problem solving by insight. The project consisted of six 1-year phases. Documentation of deficits in visual perception of preschool deaf children occurred during the initial phase. Phases II through V comprised the development of a treatment program for strengthening visual perception by problem solving and free play. Problem solving involved the child's discriminating commonalities and differences within stimulus sets to earn reinforcement. Free play included the child's exposure to eye-hand coordination toys in a free play setting. Phase VI featured identification of variables, compilation of descriptive data, statistical and test consultation, and data analysis. Main independent measures were five subtests of the Frostig Developmental Test of Visual Perception and the four subtests from the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities. The study's important finding was the statistically significant increment in visual perception skills of the problem solving group relative to the control group as assessed by performance on the Frostig.   [More]  Descriptors: Exceptional Child Research, Hearing Impairments, Learning Processes, Preschool Children

ASHCRAFT, MARION GILBERT (1967). AN ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF THE HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM UPON COLLEGE ACHIEVEMENT. THE PRINCIPAL OBJECTIVE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTS OF 2 DIFFERENT HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUMS, COLLEGE PREPARATORY AND NONCOLLEGE PREPARATORY, ON COLLEGE ACHIEVEMENT. HIGH SCHOOL TRANSCRIPTS OF 906 ENTERING FRESHMEN, RANKED ON THE BASIS OF THE PERCENTAGE OF COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSES INCLUDED, WERE DIVIDED AT THE FIRST AND THIRD QUARTILES. GROUP A INCLUDED 228 TRANSCRIPTS WHICH INDICATED AT LEAST 73 PERCENT COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSES AND GROUP B INCLUDED 226 WHICH INDICATED LESS THAN 59 PERCENT OF SUCH COURSES. COLLEGE GRADE POINT AVERAGES WERE ANALYZED FOR COMBINED AND FOR SEPARATED MALE AND FEMALE SAMPLES FOR EIGHT CONSECUTIVE SEMESTERS OF COLLEGE WITH THE AMERICAN COLLEGE TEST COMPOSITE SCORE AS THE STATISTICAL CONTROL OF ABILITY. ON THE BASIS OF THIS SCORE, GROUP A EXCELLED GROUP B, BUT WHEN SCORES WERE ADJUSTED TO A COMMON MEAN, NO SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE EXISTED FOR ACHIEVEMENT, THE COLLEGE ENTERED, OR SEX. AN ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE OF COLLEGE GRADE POINT AVERAGE ON MALE AND FEMALE SUBSAMPLES SHOWED THAT SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES OF ABILITY EXISTED BETWEEN THE TWO GROUPS BUT ACHIEVEMENT WAS NOT SIGNIFICANTLY DIFFERENT FOR THE LAST SIX SEMESTERS. THE DATA TENDED TO INDICATE THAT THE HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM WAS NOT HIGHLY CRITICAL BUT THAT GENERAL INTELLIGENCE AND NONINTELLECTIVE FACTORS WERE MORE DECISIVE TO COLLEGE ACHIEVEMENT. THE DATA COLLECTION INSTRUMENT, TABULAR DATA, AND A BIBLIOGRAPHY ARE INCLUDED.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, College Preparation, College Students, Comparative Analysis

O'Conlin, Michaele (1992). TALKit. Teaching Adult Learners Kit. Professional Development Activities for Teachers of Adult Learners. This Teaching Adult Learners Kit (TALKit) is an inservice "cafeteria" that offers many choices to the workshop planner/facilitator. The core of the kit is a series of structured workshop activities designed to help teachers build a teaching foundation–a working philosophy for adult education. Activities focus on three areas: the philosophy of teaching and learning, understanding adult learners, and effective teaching of adults. The workshop activities are all interactive, hands-on learning experiences. Introductory materials discuss the role of the facilitator and include a chart that describes each activity and areas of focus and annotated listing of videotape resources. Each of the 10 activities has some or all of these components: introduction, purpose, materials list, preparation, organization, time, numbers, followup, transparency masters, handouts, and supplementary materials. Activities are as follows: "drawing" conclusions about teaching adults; nothing personal, but…; speak out on learning; straight talk; TALK about adult learners; teachers make it work; thumbs up, thumbs down; when I teach I…; words of wisdom; and worth a thousand words. Followup options are included for teachers who want more information, a deeper experience, or resources to help them prepare a personal professional development plan. Appendixes include sample inservice programs and masters for producing a teacher journal.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Adult Educators, Adult Learning, Adult Students

Willey, Darrell S. (1966). Interim Report for an Interdisciplinary Institute for In-Service Training of Teachers and Other School Personnel to Accelerate the School Acceptance of Indian, Negro, and Spanish-Speaking Pupils from the Southwest. This report of an Institute for inservice training of teachers and other school personnel to accelerate the acceptance of Indian, Negro, and Spanish-speaking pupils in the Southwest involved 40 participants consisting of elementary and secondary teachers and principals, special education teachers, and guidance personnel selected from 35 schools within 23 school systems in five states. Major objectives were: (1) to provide educators with an insight into the social, cultural, political, and economic factors affecting the efficiency of educational programs in operation in multicultural Southwestern communities; and, (2) to develop the ability to analyze and create educational programs better suited for schools with significant numbers of minority group students. The Institute consisted of five series of lectures and small group seminars on various cultures and their respective histories, as well as field experience involving a school-community survey. The report concludes that the second major objective must await assessment until the impact of the Institute on local schools can be described. An interim evaluation of the first objective is held to be promising. Other evidence cited is considered to indicate that the Institute has been most successful in heightening the sensitivity of participants to the problems of educating children from diverse ethnic backgrounds. [For Interim Report Number 2, see ED 015 033.]   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Culture, American Indians, Black Culture, Black History

Harris, Mary B. (1970). Models, Norms and Sharing. To investigate the effect of modeling on altruism, 156 third and fifth grade children were exposed to a model who either shared with them, gave to a charity, or refused to share. The test apparatus, identified as a game, consisted of a box with signal lights and a chute through which marbles were dispensed. Subjects and the model played the game twice. The first time the model won and disposed of prize marbles in one of three ways. The second time the subject won and was free to dispose of or save prize marbles. The subjects' subsequent sharing with the model, sharing with Mental Health or a Toys for Tots charity, or their refusal to share was observed through a one-way mirror in the test van. Subjects also responded to a questionnaire designed to assess the salience of a norm of altruism. Both specific and generalized imitation of altruism were found and salience of sharing appeared to be strongly related to actual sharing and weakly related to experimental conditions.   [More]  Descriptors: Age Differences, Altruism, Grade 3, Grade 5

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