Bibliography: New Mexico (page 226 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Las Vegas. New Mexico Highlands Univ., Harlan Charles Stamm, William H. Johnson, Albuquerque. Coll. of Education. New Mexico Univ., Bernard Spolsky, Gregory P. Maltby, Silver City. Western New Mexico Univ., James G. Anderson, KATHERINE A. BEMIS, and Wayne P. Moellenberg.

GARRETT, EDGAR RAY (1965). CORRECTION OF FUNCTIONAL MISARTICULATION UNDER AN AUTOMATED SELF-CORRECTION SYSTEM. FINAL REPORT. THE AUTOMATED SPEECH CORRECTION PROGRAM (ASCP) WAS DESIGNED TO TEST THE USE OF PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION IN THE REMEDIATION OF FUNCTIONAL ARTICULATION ERRORS. A SERIES OF PROGRAMED TAPES WHICH TAKE THE STUDENT THROUGH AUDITORY IDENTIFICATION, AUDITORY DISCRIMINATION, PRODUCTION, AND SELF-EVALUATION WERE DESIGNED. SUB-GOALS OF THE EXPERIMENT WERE A COMPARISON OF CORRECTING (REPRESENTATION OF A STIMULUS WHEN SUBJECT RESPONDED INCORRECTLY) AND NON-CORRECTING (SUBJECT NOTIFIED OF ERROR BY A TONE) TECHNIQUES AND THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PERSONALIZED SUBJECT-THERAPIST CORRECTION OR NO CORRECTION BETWEEN THE DISCRIMINATION PHASE AND THE SELF-CORRECTION PHASE. SUBJECTS WERE 100 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN WITH FUNCTIONAL MISARTICULATIONS. SUBJECTS WERE ASSIGNED TO VARIED TREATMENT AND CONTROL GROUPS. RESULTS INDICATED — (1) ASCP PRODUCED IMPROVED AUDITORY DISCRIMINATION AND ARTICULATION PATTERNS AS MEASURED BY THE TEMPLIN SHORT TEST OF SOUND DISCRIMINATION AND THE TEMPLIN DARLEY SCREENING TEST, (2) THE GROUP WHICH RECEIVED CORRECTION OF ERROR DID NOT DEMONSTRATE A SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE FROM THOSE WHO RECEIVED THE NON-CORRECTING PRESENTATION, AND (3) THERE IS NO DIFFERENCE AMONG GROUPS WHICH RECEIVED OR DID NOT RECEIVE INDIVIDUALIZED THERAPY BETWEEN THE DISCRIMINATION AND SELF-CORRECTION PHASES.   [More]  Descriptors: Articulation (Speech), Auditory Discrimination, Auditory Training, Children

Anderson, James G.; And Others (1969). Mexican-American Students in a Metropolitan Context: Factors Affecting the Social-Emotional Climate of the Classroom. The study was undertaken to systematically explore some of the social mechanisms within classrooms that mediate educational effects of schools for Mexican Americans in a metropolitan context. Seventy-two teachers from 9 schools in 3 distinct ecological areas in El Paso, Texas, were asked to complete a questionnaire and the Minnesota Teacher Attitude Inventory in order to learn about their academic backgrounds, experience, instructional practices, and attitudes toward special programs for Mexican American students. The instructional process was analyzed by observing and recording classroom behavior. All of the classrooms studied were found to be highly teacher-dominated with little student-initialed discussion. However, differences in teachers' attitudes and classroom approaches were apparent at all grade levels and in all 3 areas. These included affective relations with students, directness in the classroom, and amount of empathy for Spanish-speaking students. The findings indicated that the 2 factors which profoundly affected teacher-student relationships in classrooms were the professional training of the teacher and the peculiar characteristics of the school's student body. Tables and figures are included.   [More]  Descriptors: Classroom Environment, Disadvantaged Youth, Elementary School Students, Emotional Development

Stamm, Harlan Charles (1968). The Role Expectations of Eighteen California Community-Junior College Presidents Comparative to Three Associative Reference Groups. It was hypothesized that there would be no significant difference in the role expectations of junior college presidents and the expectations of their role by their board presidents, by their administrative deans, by their faculty or senate presidents, or between or among the groups. Forty presidents filled out a Rating Scale for Administrative Effectiveness; 18 others were interviewed. All were randomly chosen from 82 California junior colleges. Seventeen of those interviewed, 12 of their board chairmen, 17 deans, and 17 faculty or senate presidents answered the Expectation-Actual Performance Questionnaire. These same groups also identified the Administrative Style and the Role Category of the presidents to provide data for the statistical analysis. Presidents and trustees were close in their perception of expected and actual performance. Any differences were accounted for by organization structure, a situation substantiated by the personal interviews. The deans' expectations of the role were almost identical, probably because of close working relationships. Views of faculty and of senate presidents coincided with their presidents'. Faculty were less impressed with how well presidents lived up to their expectations than with their actual behavior. The three reference groups did not differ significantly from the presidents in their expectations of the role. The presidents were inconsistent in that 85% of them described actual performance, but did not indicate that it was expected in their role. Descriptors: Administrator Role, College Presidents, Doctoral Dissertations, Presidents

Western New Mexico Univ., Silver City. (1967). A Study of Visual Perceptions in Early Childhood. Over a period of three years a group of 510 rural children participated in a study of visual perceptions, including eye motor coordination, discernment of figures in a ground pattern, form constancy, position in space, and spatial relations, as measured by the Frostig Visual Perceptions Test. Visual perceptions of children of other cultures were compared to those of children of the dominant Anglo-Saxon culture. The relationship of visual perceptions to cultural deprivation was also studied. The development of children's visual perceptions over a period of 18 to 25 months and the effectiveness of various types of programs in improving a child's visual perceptions were investigated. Results of testing showed that all rural children scored low in form constancy. Culturally deprived children scored lower in all perceptions, but visual perception handicaps were sometimes as great as eight times that o f control group children. The valus of the Frostig developmental training program was demonstrated. Pupil progress was retained for at least one academi c year. The study concludes that visual perception handicaps result from cultural deprivation rather than from participation in a nondominant culture. Implications are that rural children would benefit from form constancy training during their first year at school.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Conservation (Concept), Cultural Influences, Disadvantaged

Spolsky, Bernard (1974). American Indian Bilingual Education. Navajo Reading Study Progress Report No. 24. Bilingual education programs have been established in such Native American languages as Aleut, Yupik, Tlingit, Haida, Athabaskan, Cherokee, Lakota, Navajo, Papago, Pomo, Passamaquoddy, Seminole, Tewa, and Zuni. These programs include the: Choctaw Bilingual Education Program, Northern Cheyenne Bilingual Education Program, Lakota Bilingual Education Project, Rough Rock Demonstration School Bilingual/Bicultural Project, Ramah Navajo High School Bilingual Education Program, Papago Bilingual Education Program, Seminole Bilingual Project; San Juan Pueblo Tewa Bilingual Project, and Wisconsin Native American Languages Project. These programs are funded by three main sources of Federal funds–the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Title I, the 1968 ESEA Title VII (Bilingual Education Act), and Title IV of the 1972 Education Amendments (Indian Education Act). A model proposed for the description and analysis of bilingual programs tries to map all relevant factors onto a single integrated structure and to suggest some of the lines of interaction (see RC 009 343). This report describes 17 of the currently existing Native American Bilingual Education programs. Using the proposed model (which is briefly described) as a guide, the differences among the 17 programs are discussed.   [More]  Descriptors: Alaska Natives, American Indian Languages, American Indians, Bilingual Education

Maltby, Gregory P.; And Others (1988). San Elizario Bilingual Learning Community: An Application of Technology to Reading/Writing/Mathematics/Computer Literacy. Fourth Year Evaluation Report. San Elizario, Texas, is a border community with a high poverty rate, overcrowded school conditions, and a 60% limited English proficiency (LEP) rate among school students. In 1984, the school district began a cooperative university and school system project to improve Hispanic LEP students' achievement through applied computer technology. In 1987-88, the project provided computer assisted instruction in mathematics, language arts, and computer literacy to 119 students in grades 1-6 and 9-12, plus science and social science to older participants. A comparison of October 1987 and April 1988 standardized test scores showed improvement for most grade levels. The greatest reduction in the gap between participant scores and national norms occurred at grade 11 for composite scores (29%), reading (48%), and language arts (25%), and at grade 6 for mathematics (81%). Questionnaires completed by school administrators and project staff indicated that, compared to their counterparts, project students had lower absentee, dropout, and retention rates, were less in need of specialized services, and were more likely to pursue postsecondary education. Classroom observers found capable teachers providing up to date instruction in appropriate environments, eager and well behaved students, and good rapport between project staff and other school staff. But observers also noted project weaknesses in the infrequent use of native language and home culture materials during instruction. Extensive appendices include questionnaires and observer surveys used; curriculum outlines; software, hardware, and computer book inventories; and standardized test scores and statistics. This report contains 15 references.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Achievement Gains, Bilingual Education Programs, Computer Assisted Instruction

New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. Coll. of Education. (1979). An Annotated Bibliography of Bilingual Education Materials. Items in the largely annotated, March 1979 bibliography are examples of American Indian resources housed at the American Indian Bilingual Education Center (AIBEC) Materials Bank and are included in the bibliography solely for their educational and historical value. The resources are appropriate for professional research and as supplementary classroom materials. The bibliography includes approximately 400 items organized by subject, source, or genre: (1) professional books; (2) guides to American Indian education; (3) audiovisual aids; (4) materials for the Native American Materials Development Center Navajo Bilingual-Bicultural Kindergarten Kit and Supplementary Navajo Teaching Materials; (5) Navajo readers; (6) resources for multicultural education, English as a second language, American Indian education, and values clarification; and (7) materials from the National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education, ERIC, and the National Dissemination and Assessment Center. Most sections are organized alphabetically by title, and include item cost, publisher's address, and a brief description. Some citations also indicate appropriate grade level, language, and publication date. There is an extensive alphabetical list of publishers and distributors of American Indian materials. Descriptors: American Indian Education, American Indians, Annotated Bibliographies, Audiovisual Aids

Garrett, Edgar Ray (1968). Speech and Language Therapy Under an Automated Stimulus Control System. Programed instruction for speech and language therapy, based upon stimulus control programing and presented by a completely automated teaching machine, was evaluated with 32 mentally retarded children, 20 children with language disorders (childhood aphasia), six adult aphasics, and 60 normal elementary school children. Posttesting with the Templin-Darley Articulation Test showed that the Automated Stimulus Control System (ASCS) machine treatment produced non-significant results with mental retardates receiving pure tone plus M&M candy reinforcement, and significantly improved discrimination and articulation with those receiving pure tone only reinforcement (p<.05). ASCS machine treatment produced significant changes with child aphasics (p<.01). Following treatment, these subjects also showed improvement on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, and on word list performance. Both ASCS machine treatment and ASCS clinician-presented treatment produced significantly improved articulation with normal elementary school children (p<.001). Adult aphasics showed no significant change, nor did retardates receiving traditional therapy. Results indicated that significant changes in functional articulation programs occurred in 20% of the time usually required by traditional therapies.   [More]  Descriptors: Aphasia, Articulation (Speech), Auditory Stimuli, Automation

Moellenberg, Wayne P. (1967). Investigation of Methods to Assess the Effects of Cultural Deprivation. Final Report. This study investigated methods of assessing the effects of cultural deprivation in relation to school adjustment. The investigators developed new methods of assessment in areas of self-concept, (sample of 49 children) concept formation, (314 children) and value orientation, (45 children) The Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (sample of 60 children) and the Lee-Clark Reading Readiness Test (50 Head Start children) were also administered. The following conclusions were reached: (1) Differences in self-concept were detected when pictorial representations were used. (2) Pictorial representations of verbal concepts provided meaningful assessments of essential concepts without relying on reading ability. (3) The presentation of value distinctions by overhead projector resulted in different patterns of response by contrasted groups of children. (4) Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test scores were significantly different for middle class children than for lower class children. (5) Responses on the Lee-Clark Reading Readiness Test indicated difficulty for underprivileged children to recognize and categorize symbols. These abilities were improved through Head Start experiences. It is recommended that additional trial forms of the pictorial instruments be devised, and that all of the instruments be used on different groups of children. Longitudinal studies should follow.   [More]  Descriptors: Concept Formation, Disadvantaged, Lower Class, Middle Class

Spolsky, Bernard; And Others (1974). A Model for the Description, Analysis, and Perhaps Evaluation of Bilingual Education. Navajo Reading Study Progress Report No. 23. The model attempts to map all relevant factors onto a single integrated structure and to suggest some of the interaction lines. Based on a hexagonal figure, each side represents a set of factors which may have a bearing on, or be affected by, the bilingual program's operation in a particular situation–psychological, sociological, economic, political, religio-cultural, and linguistic. A seventh set of factors are the educational ones. The model comprises three of the hexagons. Representing the total situation of a community before the program's introduction, the first hexagon includes any relevant socio-educational entity, ranging from a village or neighborhood through a school district, a geographically-focused ethnic group, province, region, or nation. The second one deals with those factors which are more or less controlled by the people administering the program, or which may be directly influenced by the program's operation–i.e., the sources of the program's basic needs, the constraints within which the administrators have to work, the program's contribution to the community, and potential reasons for the program's failure. The third hexagon sets out the program's effects which may be on the individual participant or on the community at large. This report discusses the model, exemplifies the various factors, and outlines the interrelations between factors within and between the hexagons.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Bilingual Education, Community Involvement, Cultural Influences

Kari, James (1973). Navajo Language Bibliography. Preliminary Edition, September 1973. Navajo Reading Study Progress Report No. 22. Over the years the Navajo language has received more attention than any other American Indian language. The grammatical work represents all traditions in American Indian linguistic research, from the earliest descriptivism to the latest generative grammar. In addition, there exists a large amount of material written in Navajo and a plethora of pedagogically oriented research. With a population of more than 130,000, Navajo has the best chance of survival of any Indian language north of Mexico. Most important, recent years have witnessed the development of a dynamic and professional Navajo bilingual education movement. The involvement of increasing numbers of Navajos in linguistics and language education makes this a field of special theoretical and practical relevance. A preliminary attempt to cover the field of Navajo language research, this bibliography cites 478 references that relate to the study of the Navajo language. Published between 1829 and 1973, these references cover grammatical research; dictionaries; vocabularies; taxonomies; texts; comparative Athapaskan research that includes significant Navajo work; language, culture, and sociolinguistic research; and language pedagogy studies. Also listed are historical and anthropological studies that contain some Navajo language forms.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Languages, Athapascan Languages, Bibliographies, Bilingual Education

BEMIS, KATHERINE A.; COOPER, JAMES G. (1967). TEACHER PERSONALITY, TEACHER BEHAVIOR AND THEIR EFFECTS UPON PUPIL ACHIEVEMENT. FINAL REPORT. SIXTY URBAN, MIDDLE-CLASS, FOURTH-GRADE TEACHERS IN THE SOUTHWEST WERE GIVEN THE EDWARDS PERSONAL PREFERENCE SCHEDULE (EPPS) AS A MEASURE OF PERSONALITY. THEIR CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR WAS THEN RECORDED ON A TEACHER OBSERVATION PERSONALITY SCHEDULE REFLECTING EDWARDS' DEFINITIONS OF HIS NEEDS FOR ACHIEVEMENT, ABASEMENT, AFFILIATION, DOMINANCE, CHANGE, ORDERLINESS, AND HETEROSEXUALITY. PUPILS' ACHIVEMENT WAS MEASURED AS THEIR ADJUSTED GAIN SCORES BETWEEN FALL AND SPRING TESTING ON FIVE SUBTESTS OF THE SCIENCE RESEARCH ASSOCIATES ACHIEVEMENT TESTS–ARITHMETIC REASONING, ARITHMETIC CONCEPTS, ARITHMETIC COMPUTATION, READING COMPREHENSION, AND READING VOCABULARY. CANONICAL ANALYSIS OF THE THREE SETS OF DATA SHOWED RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THEM. IT WAS FOUND THAT (1) NO SINGLE TEACHER BEHAVIOR WAS DETRIMENTAL OR FAVORABLE FOR ALL LEARNING, (2) THE EPPS SCORES ESTABLISHED A BASIS FOR PREDICTING TEACHERS' OBSERVED CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR, (3) THE PATTERN OF PREDICTED BEHAVIORS DID NOT CLOSELY FOLLOW THAT REVEALED AS CONTRIBUTING TO PUPIL GAINS, (4) FROM EPPS, THE MORE EFFECTIVE TEACHERS (IN TERMS OF PUPIL GAINS) MAY BE DESCRIBED AS CRITICAL, WILLING TO ACCEPT LEADERSHIP, AND INTERESTED IN PERSUADING AND INFLUENCING OTHERS. IT WAS CONCLUDED THAT THE PARADIGM "TEACHER PERSONALITY CAUSES TEACHER TEACHER BEHAVIOR CAUSES PUPIL BEHAVIOR" WAS SUPPORTED, BUT THAT THE LINKAGES ARE COMPLEX, AND NOT 1 TO 1.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Achievement Tests, Arithmetic, Behavior Rating Scales

Anderson, James G.; Johnson, William H. (1968). Social and Cultural Characteristics of Mexican-American Families in South El Paso, Texas. Interim Report of the Mathematics Education Program. A study with emphasis upon cultural and social factors focused on urban Spanish-speaking children and their families in south El Paso, Texas. Specific objectives sought to identify: cultural and social characteristics of the student sample with respect to language patterns, basic attitudes towards school and mathematics, self-concept of ability, attitudes towards peers, and achievement motivation; and general characteristics of the student's family with respect to its socioeconomic status, language patterns, attitudes towards school and mathematics, and the amount of support given to the child to assist him in his school work. Although the students came from large, impoverished families where parents' educational levels were relatively low, higher educational aspiration for the children was evident; lack of support of the children in school was apparent, yet parents felt that everything the children studies would be valuable to them outside school. It was concluded that motivational factors were far more important in predicting success in mathematics than was the educational level of parents, or the language that they spoke.   [More]  Descriptors: Area Studies, Cultural Influences, Educational Research, Ethnomathematics

New Mexico Highlands Univ., Las Vegas. (1964). Psycho-Social Adjustment in an Indian Boarding School, September 1, 1963 – August 31, 1964. Progress Report. The procedures and setting for the establishment of a psycho-social adjustment program in the Bureau of Indian Affairs Albuquerque Indian School are described. Particular attention is given to the formal organization of the school and to other agencies having functional relationships with the school, since these factors and the physical location of the agencies seem to greatly affect the cooperation and communication between them. A major portion of the report presents a narrative account of the introduction of the project into the school and summarizes the major activities of the project team during the first year. Preliminary analyses of the types of mental health problems observed are offered to give some indication of the possible outcomes of the project and to create some impression of the type of information which is gradually accumulating. The appendices present sample case studies of a student's social history and a family interview. A related document is RC 003 321.   [More]  Descriptors: Adjustment Counselors, Adjustment (to Environment), Agency Cooperation, American Indians

Anderson, James G. (1969). Teachers of Minority Groups: The Origins of Their Attitudes and Instructional Practices. The origins of attitudes and instructional practices among teachers of Mexican American children were explored by means of a questionnaire developed to elicit information from teachers regarding their academic background, experience, career aspirations, and instructional practices, and their attitudes toward students, parents, and special programs for disadvantaged minority children. The questionnaire was administered to a sample of 72 public school mathematics teachers in 3 district ecological areas of South El Paso, Texas, and factor analysis was utilized to clarify the complex structure of the teacher variables. The findings suggested that the origins of teacher attitudes toward disadvantaged minority students might lie in the type of professional training received. Teachers' approaches, views regarding the value of compensatory and bilingual programs, and appraisal of student ability and effort, and the type of student they enjoyed teaching were related to their professional training and career aspirations. Numerous tables and figures supplement the narrative. The questionnaire used in the study is contained in the appendix.   [More]  Descriptors: Disadvantaged Youth, Mathematics Teachers, Mexican Americans, Minority Group Teachers

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