Bibliography: New Mexico (page 220 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Valerie Ford, Stephen Bernhardt, Gail Chasey Beam, Marci Laurel, Cate Dutson-Mallory, Patti Oetter, El Rito. Northern New Mexico Community Coll., Cate McClain, Carol Westby, and Stan Handmaker.

Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito. (1980). Bilingual Skills Training Program. Auto Mechanics. Module 4.0: The Automotive Electrical System. This module on the automotive electrical system is the fourth of six (CE 028 296-301) in the auto mechanics course of a bilingual skills training program (A Vocabulary Development Workbook is available as CE 028 294.) The course is designed to furnish theoretical and laboratory experience. Module objectives are for students to develop trade-related Spanish/English vocabulary; to describe the basics of electricity; to name the five main groups making up the automotive electrical system; to describe the parts and functions of the battery, starting motor, and charging system; and to name the most common problems of the electrical system. Contents include list of module objectives; pretest; six sections on (1) auto electrical system, (2) its parts, (3) battery, (4) starting motors, (5) charging system, and (6) problems of the electrical system; posttest; and English/Spanish vocabulary list. Each section is organized into this format: instructions, vocabulary, and concepts (statements or questions to direct reading) presented in English and Spanish; readings; and worksheets to evaluate comprehension of the trade-related reading material. Worksheets also cover these areas: vocabulary, definitions, word attack skills, spelling, writing skills, and application of terminology to the trade area. Descriptors: Adult Vocational Education, Auto Mechanics, Behavioral Objectives, Bilingual Education

Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito. (1980). Bilingual Vocational Training Program. Auto Body Repair. Module 1.0: Beginning Auto Body. This module on beginning auto body is the first of four (CE 028 303-306) in the auto body repair course of a bilingual vocational training program. The course is designed to furnish theoretical and laboratory experience in welding, metal straightening, metal finishing, painting, and use of power and hand tools. Module objectives are for students to develop trade-related Spanish/English vocabulary; to identify auto body repair job classifications; and to identify different metal strenghtening methods used in constructing vehicles, different vehicle frame constructions and their purpose, types of body construction and their purpose, and different units of hardware and trim and their purpose. Contents include list of module objectives; pretest; five sections on (1) auto body technicians, (2) metal strengthening, (3) frames, (4) body construction, and (5) hardware and trim; posttest; and English/Spanish vocabulary list. Each section is organized into this format: instructions, vocabulary, and concepts (statements or questions to direct reading) presented in English and Spanish; readings in English and Spanish; and worksheets to evaluate comprehension of the trade-related reading material. Worksheets also cover these areas: vocabulary, definitions, word attack skills, writing skills, spelling, and application of terminology to the trade area. Supplemental worksheets and exercises are appended. Descriptors: Adult Vocational Education, Auto Body Repairers, Behavioral Objectives, Bilingual Education

Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito. (1980). Bilingual Skills Training Program. Barbering/Cosmetology. Module 1.0: Bacteriology. This module on bacteriology is the first of ten (CE 028 308-318) in the barbering/cosmetology course of a bilingual skills training program. (A Vocabulary Development Workbook for modules 6-10 is available as CE 028 313.) The course is designed to furnish theoretical and laboratory experience. Module objectives are for students to develop trade-related Spanish/English vocabulary; to classify and define bacteria as to types; to name and illustrate members of the cocci, spirilla, and bacilli families and name diseases caused by each; and to define and give examples of parasites and saprophytes. Contents include list of module objectives; pretest; five sections on (1) definition of bacteria, (2) classification of bacteria, (3) cocci and spirilla bacteria, (4) bacilli bacteria, and (5) saprophytes and parasites; posttest; and English/Spanish vocabulary list. Each section is organized into this format: instructions, vocabulary, and concepts (statements or questions to direct reading) presented in English and Spanish; readings; and worksheets to evaluate comprehension of the trade-related reading material. (Readings in modules 1-5 are in both English and Spannish.) Worksheets also cover these areas: vocabulary, definitions, word attack skills, writing skills, spelling, and application of terminology to the trade area. Descriptors: Adult Vocational Education, Bacteriology, Barbers, Behavioral Objectives

Dutson-Mallory, Cate; Bernhardt, Stephen (1991). Effective Presentations. Communicating in Health Care Settings. An Offering of Step Ahead: A Partnership for Improved Health Care Communication. This coursebook contains materials for a course to help participants in a workplace literacy project put together a solid presentation that they can deliver with confidence. The course's stated goals are as follows: to enable participants to prepare interesting and informative presentations, use visual aids to enhance presentation, deliver presentations in a lively manner, overcome nervousness, and feel confident of their abilities as a public speaker. Materials are provided for four sessions to be presented over 3 weeks. Topics covered in the first are the following: characteristics of good and bad presentations, the communication triangle, the planning stage (purpose of speech, audience, what one knows and what one needs to know), and generating content. A planning worksheet is provided. Session two focuses on putting the presentation together; it covers the writing stage from outline to presentation, conclusions and introductions, and visual aids. Topics in the third session are as follows: the delivery stage, practicing the presentation, preparation, and keys to a strong presentation. During the fourth session, students deliver their presentations in class.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Adult Literacy, Allied Health Occupations, Basic Skills

Arango, Polly; And Others (1993). Family Module. Teams in Early Intervention. Project TIE (Teams in Early Intervention) was conceptualized to meet the need for: (1) involvement of formerly "ancillary" service professionals in early intervention for children with disabilities, (2) high quality family-centered services, and (3) training in the team approach. The project provides training to four groups that might constitute an early intervention team–speech/language pathologists, motor therapists, health care professionals, and family members. This training module emphasizes the importance of the family as the basis in delivering early intervention services. The first section, "Pathways to Teaming," outlines reasons for consulting with families; presents a framework for effective communication; emphasizes the importance of viewing the child from a holistic perspective and taking time to build a relationship between family and professional; and offers family-centered principles for speech/language pathologists, occupational/physical therapists, and health care professionals. The second section, "A Framework for Early Intervention," points out the need to determine what other team members want from families and offers a mechanism whereby family expertise can be applied to the Performance Competence Model to determine how children interact with their environment. Five handouts and overheads are appended.   [More]  Descriptors: Ancillary School Services, Disabilities, Early Childhood Education, Early Intervention

Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito. (1980). Bilingual Vocational Training Program. Auto Body Repair. Module 2.0: Tools and Equipment. This module on tools and equipment is the second of four (CE 028 303-306) in the auto body repair course of a bilingual vocational training program. The course is designed to furnish theoretical and laboratory experience in welding, metal straightening, metal finishing, painting, and use of power and hand tools. Module objectives are for students to develop trade-related Spanish/English vocabulary; to identify the most widely used general purpose tools, straightening and specialty hand tools, electric and pneumatic power tools, major collision repair equipment, refinishing equipment, and their purposes; and to identify safety rules which apply to power tools and major collision repair equipment. Contents include list of module objectives; pretest; five sections on (1) general purpose tools, (2) straightening and specialty hand tools, (3) power tools, (4) major collision repair equipment, and (5) refinishing equipment; posttest; and English/Spanish vocabulary list. Each section is organized into this format: instructions, vocabulary, and concepts (statements or questions to direct reading) presented in English and Spanish; readings; and worksheets to evaluate comprehension of the trade-related reading material. Worksheets also cover these areas: vocabulary, definitions, word attack skills, writing skills, spelling, and application of terminology to the trade area. Descriptors: Adult Vocational Education, Auto Body Repairers, Behavioral Objectives, Bilingual Education

Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito. (1980). Bilingual Vocational Training Program. Auto Body Repair. Module 4.0: Auto Body Welding. This module on auto body welding is the fourth of four (CE 028 303-306) in the auto body repair course of a bilingual vocational training program. The course is designed to furnish theoretical and laboratory experience in welding, metal straightening, metal finishing, painting, and use of power and hand tools. Module objectives are for students to develop trade-related Spanish/English vocabulary; to identify basic oxyacetylene welder components and their function, oxyacetylene welding flames and welds and how they are produced, and equipment set up procedures; and to identify general safety rules. Contents include list of module objectives; pretest; five sections on (1) basic acetylene welder components, (2) oxyacetylene welding flames, (3) equipment set up, (4) welds, and (5) oxyacetylene welding safety; posttest; and English/Spanish vocabulary list. Each section is organized into this format: instructions, vocabulary, and concepts (statements or questions to direct reading) presented in English and Spanish; readings; and worksheets to evaluate comprehension of the trade-related reading material. Worksheets also cover these areas: vocabulary, definitions, and word attack skills, writing skills, spelling, and application of terminology to the trade area. Descriptors: Adult Vocational Education, Auto Body Repairers, Behavioral Objectives, Bilingual Education

Westby, Carol; Ford, Valerie (1993). Discovering Team Culture. Teams in Early Intervention. Few interdisciplinary early intervention teams are aware that they have created a team culture–a set of norms of behavior, values, and beliefs. This manual assists team members in discovering their team culture so they understand how it affects their performance and the quality of services they provide, and so they can decide if they would like to modify team process and performance. The manual examines what team culture is, how team culture affects assessment and intervention, frameworks for exploring team culture, observational and interviewing procedures to use along with self-evaluation procedures to discover a team's culture, characteristics of effective teams, and strategies for modifying team culture. The manual is a training module of Project TIE (Teams in Early Intervention), which was conceptualized to meet the need for: (1) involvement of formerly "ancillary" service professionals in providing early intervention to children with disabilities, (2) high quality family-centered services, and (3) training in the team approach. The project provides training to four groups that might constitute an early intervention team–speech/language pathologists, motor therapists, health care professionals, and family members. Appendices list instruments for team assessment, explore characteristics of gender communications, discuss issues of prejudice and discrimination, offer a guide to ethnographic interviewing, and describe nominal group techniques. (Contains 42 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Ancillary School Services, Disabilities, Early Childhood Education, Early Intervention

Laurel, Marci; Westby, Carol (1993). Speech/Language Pathology Module. Teams in Early Intervention. Project TIE (Teams in Early Intervention) was conceptualized to meet the need for: (1) involvement of formerly "ancillary" service professionals in early intervention for children with disabilities, (2) high quality family-centered services, and (3) training in the team approach. The project provides training to four groups that might constitute an early intervention team–speech/language pathologists, motor therapists, health care professionals, and family members. This training module on speech/language pathology examines reasons for consulting with speech/language pathologists; outlines a framework for effective communication; reviews what can be expected from a speech/language pathologist; and explores relationships with other expert groups (families, occupational/physical therapists, and health care professionals). A mechanism is presented for determining what other team members want from speech/language pathologists and for applying the expertise of speech/language pathologists to the Performance Competence Model to understand how children interact with their environment. Several overheads and handouts are appended.   [More]  Descriptors: Ancillary School Services, Disabilities, Early Childhood Education, Early Intervention

Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito. (1980). Bilingual Skills Training Program. Barbering/Cosmetology. Module 2.0: Sterilization and Sanitation. This module on sterlization and sanitation is the second of ten (CE 028 308-318) in the barbering/cosmetology course of a bilingual skills training program. (A Vocabulary Development Workbook for modules 6-10 is available as CE 028 313.) The course is designed to furnish theoretical and laboratory experience. Module objectives are for students to develop trade-related Spanish/English vocabulary, to list natural defenses of the human body against pathogenic bacteria, to name three main types of vaccines and how they are made, to define sterlization and sanitation, and to list physical and chemical agents of sterlization and sanitation. Contents include list of module objectives; pretest; four sections on (1) natural defenses against bacteria, (2) medical defenses against bacteria, (3) physical agents of sterilization and sanitation, and (4) chemical agents of sterilization and sanitation; posttest; and English/Spanish vocabulary list. Each section is organized into this format: instructions, vocabulary, and concepts (statements or questions to direct reading) presented in English and Spanish; readings; and worksheets to evaluate comprehension to the trade-related reading material. (Readings in modules 1-5 are in both English and Spanish.) Worsheets also cover these areas: vocabulary, definitions, word attack skills, writing skills, spelling, and application of terminology to the trade area. Descriptors: Adult Vocational Education, Barbers, Behavioral Objectives, Bilingual Education

Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito. (1980). Barbering/Cosmetology, Module 6-10: Bilingual Vocational Language Development Workbook. This vocabulary language development workbook accompanies modules 6-10 in the barbering/cosmetology course of the Bilingual Skills Training Program (CE 028 314-318). For each module the trade-related vocabulary to be learned and practiced is first presented in both English and Spanish. Various types of activities and exercises using both the English and Spanish vocabulary are then provided, including alphabetizing, unscrambling letters, translation, finding words in puzzles, and matching Spanish to English terms. Directions are generally given in both English and Spanish. Descriptors: Adult Vocational Education, Anatomy, Barbers, Bilingual Education

Beam, Gail Chasey; And Others (1993). Introduction: Getting Started. Teams in Early Intervention. Project TIE (Teams in Early Intervention) was conceptualized to meet the need for: (1) involvement of formerly "ancillary" service professionals in early intervention for children with disabilities, (2) high quality family-centered services, and (3) training in the team approach. The project provides training to four groups that might constitute an early intervention team–speech/language pathologists, motor therapists, health care professionals, and family members. The training is designed to enable participants to determine what supports and interferes with children's performance, develop shared perspectives in viewing children's performance, apply a common conceptual framework for early intervention, explore how each profession addresses early intervention team practices, know what other team members expect from them, and improve information sharing among team members. This introductory training module contains a paper by Carol Westby titled "Developing Cultural Competence: Working with Culturally/Linguistically Diverse Families." The paper examines controversial issues in cultural diversity, cultural variations in values and beliefs, cultural differences affecting child development, and cultural influences on interviewing. Another paper, "The Performance Competence Model: A Narrative Discussion" by Meave Stevens Dominguez, promotes a holistic view of the child within the context of the child's personal characteristics, preferences, environments, family, and culture. Appendices contain a sample training agenda and cards for use in a performance competence game.  (Contains approximately 120 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Ancillary School Services, Cultural Differences, Cultural Influences, Disabilities

Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito. (1980). Bilingual Skills Training Program. Barbering/Cosmetology. Module 10.0: Circulatory System. This module on the circulatory or vascular system is the tenth of ten (CE 028 308-318) in the barbering/cosmetology course of a bilingual skills training program. (A Vocabulary Development Workbook for modules 6-10 is available as CE 028 313.) The course is designed to furnish theoretical and laboratory experience. Module objectives are for students to develop trade-related Spanish/English vocabulary, to identify and describe parts and functions of the blood-vascular and lymph-vascular systems, to explain the composition and function of blood, to explain and trace the circulation of blood, and to name and locate arteries and veins of the head, face, neck, and arms. Contents include list of module objectives; pretest; six sections on (1) circulatory system, (2) blood-vascular system, (3) blood, (4) blood circulation, (5) arteries and veins, and (6) lymph-vascular system; posttest; and English/Spanish vocabulary list. Each section is organized into this format: instructions, vocabulary, and concepts (statements or questions to direct reading) presented in English and Spanish; readings; and worksheets to evaluate comprehension of the trade-related reading material. (Readings in modules 1-5 are in both English and Spanish.) Worksheets also cover these areas: vocabulary, definitions, word attack skills, writing skills, spelling, and application of terminology to the trade area. Descriptors: Adult Vocational Education, Anatomy, Barbers, Behavioral Objectives

McClain, Cate; Handmaker, Stan (1993). Healthcare Professional Module. Teams in Early Intervention. Project TIE (Teams in Early Intervention) was conceptualized to meet the need for: (1) involvement of formerly "ancillary" service professionals in early intervention for children with disabilities, (2) high quality family-centered services, and (3) training in the team approach. The project provides training to four groups that might constitute an early intervention team–speech/language pathologists, motor therapists, health care professionals, and family members. The goal of this training module is to have team members understand how health care professionals approach developmental concerns. The module presents reasons for consulting with health care professionals, a framework for effective communication, medical risk factors for developmental problems, the medical work-up of a child with developmental delay, growth parameters, what other team members want from health care professionals, and application of the health care professional's expertise to the Performance Competence Model (which determines how children interact with their environment). The module includes an outline of content in each of these areas and copies of 16 overheads and handouts.   [More]  Descriptors: Ancillary School Services, Child Development, Clinical Diagnosis, Developmental Delays

Oetter, Patti; And Others (1993). Occupational/Physical Therapy Module. Teams in Early Intervention. Project TIE (Teams in Early Intervention) was conceptualized to meet the need for: (1) involvement of formerly "ancillary" service professionals in early intervention for children with disabilities, (2) high quality family-centered services, and (3) training in the team approach. The project provides training to four groups that might constitute an early intervention team–speech/language pathologists, motor therapists, health care professionals, and family members. This training module on occupational therapy and physical therapy outlines reasons for consulting with occupational/physical therapists (OT/PTs) as members of the interdisciplinary team; explores areas of information that should be shared between OT/PTs and health care professionals, speech/language pathologists, and family members; discusses what health care professionals can expect from an ongoing collaboration with an occupational/physical therapist; offers a mechanism for determining what other team members want from OT/PTs; and examines how OT/PTs' expertise can be applied to the Performance Competence Model to understand how children interact with their environment. Three overheads and handouts are appended.   [More]  Descriptors: Ancillary School Services, Disabilities, Early Childhood Education, Early Intervention

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