Bibliography: New Mexico (page 215 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Erica McClure, Hubert Velarde, Everett Edington, Leonard Hays, Frederick L. Jenks, ALLEN BJERGO, Marilyn Schauer Samuels, CO. Denver Public Schools, Albuquerque National Education Task Force de la Raza, and Albuquerque National Indian Council on Aging.

Jenks, Frederick L. (1971). Mexico's New Generation Speaks Out: Trends in Urban Society, American Foreign Language Teacher. Descriptors: Cultural Background, Cultural Context, Cultural Images, Cultural Interrelationships

Charles, Roger; And Others (1981). National Education Policies for Aboriginal Peoples. Written as a reference for students, teachers, educationists, lawyers, and researchers, the book provides information on the education of indigenous peoples and a variety of other interests, such as characteristics of individual countries, history of native peoples, country's definition of indigenous people, statistics on educational performance, and general descriptions of each country involved. A bibliography follows each chapter providing more complete resource material. The first group of countries (the United States, New Zealand, Australia, Mexico and Brazil) is studied with a considerable amount of detail because they have recognized indigenous people and provide valuable comparative models for Canada. Intended to provide a world wide perspective on indigenous peoples, the second group of countries is divided in four sub-groups and includes: (1) Ecuador, Bolivia, Peru; (2) Norway, Sweden, Finland; (3) Martinique, Guadeloupe, New Caledonia; (4) South Africa, China, New Guinea. The first sub-group is classfied as developing countries and presents difficulties indigenous people have in poor countries. The second sub-group are developed countries and have certain similarities with Canada. The third are described as colonialist; their situation has certain similarities to Canada 100 years ago. The fourth sub-group is more diversified. Descriptors: American Indian Education, Demography, Developed Nations, Developing Nations

Velarde, Hubert (1972). Statement of Hubert Velarde, Jicarilla Apache Tribe to United States Commission on Civil Rights at Albuquerque Convention Center (Albuquerque, New Mexico, November 14, 1972). The statement by the President of the Jicarilla Apache Tribe emphasizes reservation problems that need to be examined. Presented at a 1972 Civil Rights Commission hearing on Indian Concerns, Velarde's statement listed employment, education, the administration of justice, water rights, and medical services as areas for investigation.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Community Involvement, Courts

1968 (1968). Employment Problems of Mexican Americans and Indians. Recommendations and Observations Made at the Southwest Employer Conference on Mexican American and Indian Employment Problems (Albuquerque, New Mexico, July 10-12, 1968). The conference brought together 250 industrialists and management officials, representatives of state, local, and Federal government agencies, and leaders of the Mexican American and Indian communities. The purpose of the conference was to explore and outline attempts at a solution to discrimination and under utilization of talent, as well as discuss how to put disadvantaged members of the 2 largest minorities in the Southwestern States into productive employment. Excerpts from more than a dozen individual addresses and highlights of 15 panel discussion sessions were included in the conference report. Topics discussed during the conference included: (1) Creating New Plants in New Places; (2) Sources of Funds for Training Programs; (3) Developing Union-Industry Cooperation on Minority Problems; (4) Bringing Vocational Education into Line with Industry's Needs; (5) Industry's Stake in Improving Local Education; and (6) Communicating with the Barrio and the Reservation: The Myth and the Reality. Descriptors: American Indians, Employment Opportunities, Employment Potential, Employment Problems

National Education Task Force de la Raza, Albuquerque, NM. (1973). Report of a National Bilingual Bicultural Institute: A Relook at Tucson '66 and Beyond (Albuquerque, New Mexico, November 28-December 1, 1973). The symposium, convened in 1966 at the University of Arizona (Tucson), served as a sequel to the 1965 "Tucson Survey on the Teaching of Spanish to the Spanish Speaking" and as a prologue to action. November 28-December 1, 1973 a National Bilingual Bicultural Institute was held to: (1) review the rationale, activities, and recommendations of the 1966 symposium; (2) review important activities in bilingual bicultural education since 1966; (3) demonstrate exemplary bilingual bicultural education programs which have been implemented in school settings of high Mexican American concentration; (4) review present and pending State and national bilingual bicultural education legislation and appropriations; and (5) develop new directions for bilingual bicultural education in American education for the 1970's which will lead to national legislation. Since Chicanos are the largest Spanish speaking community in the United States, the institute's emphasis was on bilingual bicultural education for Mexican American children, from preschool to college. Given in this report are: (1) condensed versions of addresses given at the institute; (2) work lab reports on State and national legislative, administrative, court, and community action; (3) brief descriptions of local and national bilingual bicultural exemplary projects; and (4) general institute recommendations.   [More]  Descriptors: Biculturalism, Bilingual Education, Community Action, Conferences

Edington, Everett; Hays, Leonard (1978). Differences in Family Size and Marriage Age Expectation and Aspirations of Anglo, Mexican American and Native American Rural Youth in New Mexico, Adolescence. In 1975, questionnaires were given to 587 sophomores and seniors in 12 rural high schools. Findings included significant differences between ethnic groups on expected and desired family size and marriage age; but no differences between age groups.   [More]  Descriptors: Age Differences, American Indians, Aspiration, Cultural Differences

Conran, Philip B.; And Others (1991). Comparison of Faculty Members' and Students' Perceptions Concerning Performance Criteria and Evaluation Strategies at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Academic Medicine. A survey of faculty (n=223) and students (n=157) in two different curriculum tracks (problem-based/student-centered primary care vs. regular) at one medical school gathered opinions on the methods and criteria of student evaluation. Differences occurred primarily in the perceptions of first- and second-year students in the problem-based curriculum. Descriptors: Evaluation Criteria, Evaluation Methods, Higher Education, Medical Education

Rios-Bustamante, Antonio Jose (1976). New Mexico in the Eighteenth Century: Life, Labor and Trade in la Villa de San Felipe de Albuquerque, 1706-1790, Azlan—-International Journal of Chicano Studies Research.   [More]  Descriptors: Population Growth, Social History, Sociocultural Patterns, Socioeconomic Background

McClure, Erica (1992). The Pragmatics of Codeswitching in Mexican Political, Literary, and News Magazines, Pragmatics and Language Learning. A study investigated the syntactic properties and functions of English-Spanish code-switching in literary, political, and news magazines in Mexico. It is proposed that oral code-switching in Chicano communities and written code-switching in the Mexican press differ both syntactically and pragmatically, with the latter more syntactically restricted. Spanish is found to be the matrix language in the Mexican press, while in Chicano code-switching the matrix language is not always discernable. Several possible explanations are offered. In addition, it is found that code-switching in the Mexican press has limited pragmatic functions because it involves a written channel, is addressed to an anonymous audience, and is constrained by negative attitudes toward the type of code-switching found in the United States' Chicano community and the ambivalent status of English in Mexico. Finally, it is noted that this ambivalence is reflected in the use of English in the Mexican press, where it is used both to evoke a more precise image or sophisticated tone than a Spanish word or phrase and to attack American politics and values.   [More]  Descriptors: Code Switching (Language), Cultural Context, Discourse Analysis, English (Second Language)

National Indian Council on Aging, Albuquerque, NM. (1981). May the Circle Be Unbroken: A New Decade. Final Report on the National Indian Conference on Aging (3rd, Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 8-10, 1980). Focusing on six major topics to be addressed at the 1981 White House Conference (economic security, physical and mental health, social well being, older Americans as a national resource, creating an age-integrated society, and research), the National Indian Conference attracted 1,165 persons from more than 140 tribes (592 being Indian elders over 69 years of age). Twenty-five intensive 4-hour workshops on Indian elderly covered such areas as institutional care, in-home services, transportation, nutrition, pensions, Indian religious freedom, elderly and the Indian Child Welfare Act, education of and by Indian elders, relationships between young and old, energy related problems, census methodology, biomedical research, social research, elderly urban Indians, the future of American Indian culture, tribal elderly and energy development, institutional care, the Administration on Aging and Title VI, and political activism. Resolutions are listed urging establishment of supplemental burial funds, establishment of an Indian Desk within the Administration on Aging, adoption of the concept of direct funding in all Federal social services programs, etc. The final report also provides an introduction, background, objectives, format, participants, events, and agenda. Appendices contain a list of workshop topics and panelists, conference resolutions and tribal resolutions, and a list of Congressional committees concerned with Indian elderly.   [More]  Descriptors: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Cultural Awareness, Delivery Systems

Kelley, Patrick M., Ed.; Samuels, Marilyn Schauer, Ed. (1984). The Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication Proceedings (11th, Santa Fe, New Mexico, February 23-24, 1984). Articles in these proceedings of a conference of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication represent the views of professional communicators and academicians who share a concern for providing breadth and quality of preparation for present and future technical communicators. The topics of the 19 papers include the following: (1) the present state and the history of technical writing instruction, (2) a graduate studies proposal for the University of Washington, (3) the master of arts in professional writing at Carnegie-Mellon University, (4) a master's in English with a special option in technical writing at Oklahoma State University, (5) the role of linguistics and language study in the technical writing program at Oklahoma State University, (6) developing a master of science degree in communications at Eastern Washington University, (7) technical communication as a humanities degree, (8) preparing writers for the world of work, (9) the certificate program at San Diego State University, (10) implications of research and experience for a technical writing program, (11) teaching the writing process in a laboratory setting, (12) a cooperative internship/degree program at Rochester Institute of Technology, (13) teaching technical writing on television at Northeastern University, (14) the efficacy of the required three hour technical writing course, (15) a course in technical and scientific literature, and (16) a graduate seminar in the theory and practice of technical writing. Minutes from the Council's annual business meeting, the conference program, and a list of Council members are included. Descriptors: Communication (Thought Transfer), Curriculum Evaluation, Education Work Relationship, Graduate Study

Walker, Daniel Gers (1966). The Potential of the Junior College in the Developing Nations of the World. The "rising expectations" of the world today include more educational opportunity. This study investigated the potential of the junior college in certain developing countries of the world, the comprehension of its concepts by foreign educators, the extent of their interest, and their recognition of such a need. Chapters deal with master planning and surveys in the continental U.S.; with unique developments in Alaska, Hawaii, and American overseas dependencies with their assorted subcultures; and with developments in Canada, Japan, Chile, and Kenya. Extensive surveys were made of New Zealand and Mexico, which have no junior colleges. After a trial of the instruments in Nevada, information was sent to educational and civic leaders in Invercargill, the regional capital of south New Zealand, and in Mexicali, Baja California. The literature was followed by a questionnaire seeking opinions on the desirability or otherwise of many aspects of the institution of junior colleges. From New Zealand, reaction to the functions and characteristics of junior colleges and to the desirability of establishing one in Invercargill was generally favorable, with only a few reservations. Staffing, rather than funds, was considered the most likely obstacle. The Mexican respondents generally approved of the whole concept, insofar as they understood it, but viewed the establishment of any such institution pessimistically. Money even for building would be unavailable and the present overcrowded, inadequate educational system would have to be improved first. Descriptors: Developing Nations, Doctoral Dissertations, Educational Philosophy, Foreign Countries

Meier, Matt S., Ed.; Rivera, Feliciano, Ed. (1974). Readings on La Raza–The Twentieth Century. This chronological anthology consists of documents and articles on the history of Mexican American people in the 20th century. The anthology may be directed to students in higher education, historians, and those interested in the Mexican American people. Section I spans the period from 1900 to 1920 and introduces immigration as the starting point for the history of La Raza in this century. Section II, covering from 1920 to 1930, describes the movement of Mexicans and Mexican Americans from their Southwest heartland to steel mills, packing plants, and "colonias" of the Midwest. Other sections address themselves to the development of a hostile attitude on the part of many Americans to the rising tide of Mexican immigration, as was exemplified by the Harris and Box bills in Congress. Section III deals with repatriation in the 1930's. Chicano World War II experiences both at home and overseas are described in Section IV. The Second World War introduced a new era in Mexico-United States relations, formalizing the use of bracero labor. Section V traces continuing postwar demands for Mexican labor and the resultant increase in both braceros and majados. The impact of these workers eventually led to "Operation Wetback" and finally to termination of the bracero program in 1964. Section VI encompasses a broad spectrum of contemporary Chicano activities and ideology, especially an increased and more aggressive political activity. These 6 sections are chronologically sequential, with some unavoidable overlap. Descriptors: Activism, Anthologies, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Background

Denver Public Schools, CO. (1969). The Heritage and Contributions of the Hispanic American. Teacher's Edition. This booklet was developed to help elementary school students to understand the contributions of the Hispano to our American way of life: 1) to learn something about the history of the Hispanic people –the Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Spanish, Mexican-American, and Spanish-American; and, 2) to develop an understanding of the political and cultural differences between ethnic or racial groups, and the individual differences between the human beings that make up these groups. Suggested activities are enumerated: map work, time-line building, thought questions, discussion, oral reports, vocabulary study, diorama, creative writing, games, and resource use. The individual units are: 1) Spain, World Power; 2) Spanish Exploration in the Americas; 3) Spanish Colonialism; 4) Early Settlements; 5) Spanish Missions in the New World; 6) Mexico Wins Independence from Spain; 7) Encroachment of Mexico; and, 8) Spanish Settlement in Colorado. Teacher references and books for student reading are listed in a 4 page bibliography which includes the price of each publication.   [More]  Descriptors: American History, Class Activities, Discussion (Teaching Technique), Elementary Education

BJERGO, ALLEN (1964). NEW PERSPECTIVES IN YOUNG AND ADULT FARMER AND RANCHER EDUCATION, AN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION SUMMARY REPORT OF THE SOUTHWESTERN CONFERENCE ON YOUNG-ADULT FARMER AND RANCHER EDUCATION (NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY, JULY 15 – AUGUST 2, 1963). PARTICIPANTS IN THIS REGIONAL WORKSHOP HAD AS THEIR OBJECTIVE TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE PURPOSES, MEANS, ADMINISTRATIVE FRAMEWORK, POLICIES, PROCEDURES, COURSE CONTENT, ADVISORY COMMITTEES, INITIATION, TEACHING TECHNIQUES, COMMUNITY RESOURCES, AND LEADERSHIP TECHNIQUES NECESSARY TO IMPROVE AND EXPAND THE PROGRAM OF ADULT AND YOUNG FARMER EDUCATION. CONSULTANTS INCLUDED UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS, AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION SUPERVISORS, COMMODITY GROUP REPRESENTATIVES, AND EXTENSION SERVICE PERSONNEL. THE CONFERENCE WAS ATTENDED BY 10 VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE TEACHERS AND FIVE COLLEGE STUDENTS. THE CONTENT, DEVELOPED FROM INDIVIDUAL PRESENTATIONS, COMMITTEE WORK, PANEL PRESENTATIONS, AND REFERENCE CITATIONS, IS PRESENTED AS SECTIONS ON VARIOUS ASPECTS OF ADULT AND YOUNG FARMER EDUCATION INCLUDING THE VALUE OF PROGRAMS, ESTABLISHMENTS IN FARMING, NEED FOR PROGRAMS, TRENDS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION, PREPARING TEACHERS, STUDY OF COMMUNITY NEEDS, SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR'S VIEWPOINT, POLICIES, ORGANIZING AND USING PLANNING COMMITTEES, ORGANIZING AND INITIATING NEW PROGRAMS, FARM MANAGEMENT FOR ADULT FARMERS, TEACHING METHODS, CURRICULUM PLANNING, INDIVIDUAL ON-FARM TEACHING, PLANNING COUNTY-WIDE PROGRAMS, LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT IN EXTENSION, LOCAL AND STATE PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG FARMERS, AND EVALUATION OF ADULT EDUCATION.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Farmer Education, Advisory Committees, Agricultural Education, Community Resources

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