Bibliography: New Mexico (page 213 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Ruth Blank, Fletcher Scott, David Conde, VIRIGINIA R. KEEHAM, Window Rock Navajo Tribe Education Committee, S. Gregory Bowes, Russel E. Kilgore, Lily Chu, Robert O. Coppedge, and Las Cruces. New Mexico State Univ..

LONGABAUGH, RICHARD (1966). AN ANALYSIS OF THE CROSS-CULTURAL STUDY OF CHILDREN'S SOCIAL BEHAVIOR, FINAL REPORT. SYSTEMATICALLY OBSERVED, RECORDED, AND CODED INTERPERSONAL BEHAVIORS OF CHILDREN, AGES 3 TO 11, WERE EXAMINED FOR THE EXISTENCE OF CROSS-CULTURALLY CONSISTENT RELATIONS BETWEEN THEIR BEHAVIORS. THE STUDY SAMPLE CONSISTED OF OVER 130 CHILDREN FROM DIVERSE CULTURES, AND WAS SELECTED FROM COMMUNITIES IN NEW ENGLAND, MEXICO, AFRICA, INDIA, OKINAWA, AND THE PHILIPPINES. TWELVE CATEGORIES OF ACTION, COLLECTED FROM BEHAVIORS OF THE CHILDREN AS THEY WERE OBSERVED IN NATURAL SETTINGS, WERE THE PRIMARY FOCUSES OF THE ANALYSIS. IT WAS SUGGESTED THAT THREE FACTORS SEEM TO PRODUCE THE AMOUNT AND KIND OF INTERPERSONAL BEHAVIOR OF A CHILD–(1) HIS ABILITY TO MEDIATE OUTCOMES FOR OTHERS, (2) HIS PREDISPOSITION TOWARD OTHERS, AND (3) THE CONSEQUENCES FOR SOCIAL EXCHANGE WHICH ARISE OUT OF THE INTERACTION OF THESE TWO PRINCIPAL FACTORS. THIS STRUCTURE WAS APPARENTLY COMPATIBLE WITH THEORY AND RESEARCH IN AT LEAST THREE SEPARATE AREAS OF RESEARCH–(1) CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, (2) SMALL GROUP RESEARCH, AND (3) MOTHER-CHILD INTERACTION. CORRELATION MATRICES FOR BEHAVIOR RATES BY SPECIFIC CULTURES WERE PROVIDED FOR EACH OF THE 12 CATEGORIES OF ACTION IN THE REPORT.   [More]  Descriptors: Behavior, Childhood Attitudes, Cultural Differences, Culture

Ortego, Felipe, Comp.; Conde, David, Comp. (1975). The Chicano Literary World–1974. The National Symposium on Chicano Literature and Critical Analysis (1st, Las Vegas, New Mexico, November 1974). Over 200 participants from 10 states and 17 universities attended "The First National Symposium on Chicano Literature and Critical Analysis." Five of the papers presented at the symposium are given in this publication. The papers cover Chicano poetry, novel, drama, and popular folklore humor. "National Character vs Universality in Chicano Poetry" sets forth the notion that national traditions are adaptations of universal styles and national character is or should be but a step toward universality. The new "space" (identity) of Chicano art or literature is related to the definition of the Chicano national character in "The Space of Chicano Literature." In "La Prosa Chicano: Tres Epigones de la Novela Mexicana de la Revolucion", three novels are reviewed–Tomas Rivera's "Y no se lo trago la tierra", Rolando R. Hinojosa-S.'"Estampas del valle y otras obras", and Miguel Mandez-M.'s "Peregrinos de Aztlan." Humor as a tool of artistic expression is the topic of "Chicano Folklore: Raza Humor in Texas." Although the title indicates a Texas context, many of the situations and expressions are part of the national Chicano experience. "Satire: Techniques and Devices in Luis Valdez"Las Dos Caras del Patroncito'" traces the exchange of roles between the oppressor and the oppressed.   [More]  Descriptors: Analytical Criticism, Characterization, Conferences, Drama

New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. (1986). Teaching to Potential. Proceedings of the Regional Conference on University Teaching (2nd, Las Cruces, New Mexico, January 9-10, 1986). Proceedings of a regional conference on teaching to potential are presented. The 48 papers address three areas of concern: training or educating–future requirements, cultural diversity in higher education, and relating disciplinary research to university teaching. Papers and authors include: "Training or Education: Future Requirements for the Profession of University Teaching" (Mark H. Curtis); "Technology Transfer through Training: Emerging Roles for the University" (Harold M. Bergsma); "Curricula for the Twenty-First Century" (W. Brock Brentlinger); "An Analysis of Student Expectations regarding Concepts of Teaching Format" (Edsel Buchanan); "Training Knowledge Workers: A New Perspective on Graduate Education" (Paulette Chaffin, William Ammentorp); "Future Requirements in Management Training–Teaching at the University Level" (Barbara G. Connellee); "Reaching for the Potential, II: Identifying and Reaching Teacher Goals" (Paul R. Dingman); "The Necessity of Training before Education: The Fingertip Effect and Learning as Related to Teaching Computer Skills to Faculty" (Carlton W. Dukes); "Cultural Diversity in Higher Education: A Critical Continuing Issue" (Tomas A. Arciniega); "Mexican American Faculty in the Southwest: Some Survey Results" (Adalberto Aguirre); "The College Classroom: Changing Climates and Cultures" (Len Ainsworth); "Cultural Diversity: An Expectation for Teaching" (Narviar Cathcart Barker); "Graduate Training for Administrative Positions: A Conceptual Model" (Janet Burke); "Messages in the Classroom: Culture Is Communication" (Jean M.  Civikly); "Teaching and Research: The Necessary Balance" (Glenn A. Crosby); "The Electoral College in 1988: A Model for Nationwide Campus Simulations" (Charles T. Barber); "The Value of Analysis of Standardized Placement Exams: A Case Study of Cell Structure" (Robert V. Blystone); "Writing in the Disciplines: Research and Implications" (Christopher C. Burnham); "Test Anxiety and Academic Achievement" (Moon K. Chang); and "A Model for Bridging Theories and Applications" (Lily Chu). Descriptors: College Curriculum, College Instruction, College Role, Cultural Differences

Tebeaux, Elizabeth (1999). Designing Written Business Communication Along the Shifting Cultural Continuum: The New Face of Mexico, Journal of Business and Technical Communication. Focuses on the rhetorical strategies for written business communication in Mexico. Explains the methods used to collect documents for examination, discusses several of these documents as they reflect Mexico's history and cultural value dimensions, and summarizes principles for designing written business communication for Mexico. Descriptors: Business Communication, Cultural Influences, Foreign Countries, Higher Education

Bowes, S. Gregory, Ed. (1985). Adult and Community Education in the 1980's. A Compendium of Lectures from Series in Adult Education at the University of New Mexico (1979-1984). This compendium contains lectures on programs, administration, and services and on teaching and learning in adult and community education. The following lectures are included: "Working Effectively with Adults: What Research and Practice Tell Us," by Mark Rossman; "Learning How to Learn," by Robert Smith; "Assessing Teaching Style in Adult Education: How and Why," by Gary Conti; "Self-guided Learning and Change," by Allen Tough; "Non-traditional Adult Learning," by R. Andrew Johnson; "Development and Status of the American Community/Junior College," by S. Gregory Bowes; "Adult Education in Business and Industry," by Richard L. Knowdell; "The Reentry Woman in Higher Education," by Dolores Hentschel; "Needs Assessment Strategies and Techniques," by Malcolm Knowles; "Counseling and the Adult Learner," by Violet Malone; "Marketing and Promotion Strategies and Techniques," by Stanley Grabowski; and "Professional Burnout," by Mary Doris Woltkamp Rounds. Descriptors: Adult Counseling, Adult Education, Adult Learning, Community Education

Coppedge, Robert O.; Gray, James R. (1968). Recreational Use and Value of Water at Elephant Butte and Navajo Reservoirs. New Mexico State University Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin 535. This document is a descriptive study of the recreational use and the value of water at Elephant Butte and Navajo Reservoirs. Previous research studies, as well as the study areas and recreational characteristics and procedures of investigation used in this study (sampling and data collection, data organization, analysis) are described. Discussions of water values (consumptive use, reaction to water levels, consumptive values of water) and the elasticities of demand are included. There are numerous tables and maps.   [More]  Descriptors: Environmental Education, Environmental Research, Natural Resources, Physical Environment

Chu, Lily (1979). Toward A Humanistic Behaviorism: Self-Efficacy in Multicultural Education. A Presentation in the College of Education Dialogue Series, New Mexico State University. The paper approaches the issue of educational equity from the perspective of individuals' perceptions of the opportunity available to them and their ability to interact with their world effectively. The proposed model of humanistic behaviorism, with its emphasis on self-efficacy, has special implications for multicultural education. The changing social, environmental conditions with intention to provide more opportunity for those who are traditionally disadvantaged may not result in corresponding equal participation, if the subjective expectancy concerning the personal accessibility to this opportunity is not fostered at the same time. The teacher's role in multicultural settings is a key factor toward the development of students' attitudes about themselves in schools. Goodwill toward students alone may not be sufficient to bring about humane and efficacious interactions, but must be accompanied by responsible, thoughtful strategies, by allowing the student the chance to make the quest for personal control. There exists a reciprocal interactive relationship between teachers' sense of self-efficacy in teaching and motivating the students, students' sense of self-efficacy in their ability to learn, and the general multicultural environmental variable. The development of self-efficacy is contingent upon one's taking personal responsibility for one's teaching or learning. Descriptors: Attitudes, Behavior, Behavior Theories, Disadvantaged

Blank, Ruth (1971). The Development of an Instructional Materials Center at the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1970. The three objectives of this study are: (1) to identify the particular learning needs of the students at the Institute of American Indian Arts; (2) to evaluate the attitudes of the teachers, and the acceptance by the students of an instructional materials center program and (3) to describe the inception of such a program. It is noted that different traditions and language have created resistance to learning in a mono-cultural anglo-oriented school system. Changes in educators' attitudes, different forms of school direction and control, and innovative teaching methods are proposed for more effective educational programs. The instructional materials center program aims to overcome deficiencies in previous educational experience and provide materials for enriched learning, locally and to other schools. Further development of an integrated instructional materials center program requires additional facilities, equipment, materials and trained personnel in order to accomplish the objectives and specialized functions of a dynamic media and resource center for Indian culture.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Culture, American Indians, Audiovisual Aids, Development

Navajo Tribe Education Committee, Window Rock, AZ. (1961). Teaching of English to Navajo Children, Annual Conference on Navajo Education (4th, University of New Mexico, January 22-25, 1961). Participants in prior planning sessions selected problems encountered in teaching English to Navajo students as the specific theme to be stressed during the conference. Subsequently, 5 formal addresses were presented at the conference, w rkshop groups were formed and 6 workshops were conducted, and 2 panel discussions were held. The major foci of the formal addresses were teaching English as a foreign language, and planning for the education of Navajo children in the future. Among recommendations made by the workshop groups were the need for educators to further familiarize themselves with Navajo culture and the need for prospective teachers of Navajo children to have specialized training. Topics for the panel group discussions were entitled, "Needs and Values of Language Development for Navajo Students" and "Promising Practices in Language Teaching."   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Cross Cultural Training, English (Second Language), Second Language Learning

Bowes, S. Gregory, Ed. (1980). Alternatives for the 80's. A Compendium of Lectures and Resource Documents from an Institute in Adult Education at the University of New Mexico. The papers in this compendium center on adult/community college education and the alternatives that will be presented to faculty, institutions, and communities during the 1980s. In "Working Effectively with Adults: What Research and Practice Tell Us," Mark Rossman discusses the adult learner's physiological changes, mental abilities, psychological factors affecting adult learning, and the adult orientation to learning. John Niemi gives examples of cultural differences, especially in relation to minority groups, and their implications for adult education, in "Cross-Cultural Considerations in Adult Education." The development of inservice teacher education to meet certification needs, professional growth needs, and leadership dimensions is the topic of Richard Rounds in "The Professional Development Plan (PDP) at the Albuquerque Technical-Vocational Institute." In "The Reentry Woman in Higher Education," Dolores Hentschel reviews the history of this movement, shares research-based generalizations about the women who are the participants, examines implications, and raises questions about practices. Finally, Daniel J. Timko offers practical methods of teaching adults in "A Practitioner's View of Improving Instruction in Adult Vocational and Technical Instruction." Descriptors: Adult Education, Adult Educators, Adult Learning, Adult Students

Kilgore, Russel E.; And Others (1980). Indian Resources Development and Internship Program. Annual American Indian High School Student Orientation (4th, Las Cruces, New Mexico, June 8-14, 1980). This orientation program is designed to acquaint American Indian high school sophomores and juniors with a wide variety of academic college majors, programs, careers, and job opportunities. Emphasis is placed on agriculture, business administration, economics, energy, engineering, management, and natural resources. Included in the week's activities are orientation of financial and other college services available to help students adjust and succeed in college studies. Students are exposed to actual college life situations including housing, food service, recreation, sports and physical development, and contacts with college students and faculty members. One objective of the program is that participants become stimulated and motivated to want to pursue an academic education beyond the high school level and pursue those courses of study in high school that will help them to prepare more closely to be successful in college studies leading to their objectives. Activities are balanced between classroom-type instruction, fieldwork, tours, laboratory visitations and demonstrations, free time, planned recreation, and a visit to a local manufacturing firm. The latter provides excellent opportunities to learn and reinforce the need for trained and skillful personnel in production, engineering, management, skilled labor marketing, and accounting. Descriptors: American Indian Education, American Indians, College Preparation, College School Cooperation

KEEHAM, VIRIGINIA R.; MAYHON, W.G. (1963). "OPERATIONAL FUTURE." A REPORT OF RESEARCH THROUGH SERVICE TO THE ACADEMICALLY SUPERIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN NEW MEXICO. ACADEMICALLY TALENTED SOPHOMORE, JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS WERE SELECTED TO PARTICIPATE IN "OPERATION FUTURE." PARENTS, TEACHERS, AND STUDENTS RECEIVED THE FOLLOWING–INDIVIDUAL COUNSELING INTERVIEWS TO DISCUSS FUTURE PLANS OVER A 2- OR 3-YEAR PERIOD, APTITUDE AND ABILITY TESTING, GROUP SEMINARS AND DISCUSSIONS RELATED TO CAREER INFORMATION, SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS, AN OPPORTUNITY TO VISIT COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY CLASSES AND TO TALK TO PROFESSORS, AND TANGIBLE EVIDENCE THAT OTHERS ARE INTERESTED AND WILLING TO HELP THEM BETTER THEIR EDUCATION AND CAREERS. AFTER AN ORIENTATION PROGRAM, THE STUDENT SELECTED THE LECTURES AND GROUP SESSIONS HE WANTED TO ATTEND. RECOMMENDATIONS INCLUDED–AN INCREASED EMPHASIS ON ENCOURAGING STUDENTS TO APPLY FOR SCHOLARSHIPS, INCREASED ATTENTION TO THE LEARNING PROCESSES, THE USE OF NEW MEDIA, THE USE OF NEW PRACTICES IN THE CLASSROOM, CONTINUED RESEARCH RELATED TO FINANCING AN EDUCATION, THE IMPROVEMENT OF VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION, AND INCREASED CURRICULUM EVALUATION. Descriptors: Conferences, Curriculum Development, Educational Improvement, Educational Research

Osbourn, Pat; Scott, Fletcher (2004). Autism Spectrum Disorders: Guidance on Providing Supports and Services to Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Their Families. Technical Assistance Manual, New Mexico State Department of Education. The field of autism is rapidly changing with increased funding for research into causes and treatments of this Autism Spectrum Disorder. This document will focus primarily on behavioral and communication treatment approaches that may be used within early intervention and/or preschool special education. Other treatment approaches that are not covered in this document include biomedical and dietary treatments as well as complementary approaches such as art, music and animal therapy. Throughout this document the term "early childhood"  is used to refer to children from birth to 8, however the primary intended audience of this document is for families and providers of children birth to 5. This technical assistance document is intended to be used by personnel in early intervention agencies and local education agencies as well as family members of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The following are appended: (1) M-CHAT: Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers; (2) Diagnostic Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorders; (3) Basic Skills Needed by Young Children with ASD; (4) Sample Outcomes/Goals for Young Children with ASD; and (5) Case Studies. Three sections follow the appendices: (1) frequently asked questions; (2) bibliography; (3) resources; and (4) glossary.   [More]  Descriptors: Check Lists, Young Children, Autism, Early Intervention

New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. (1985). Teaching to Potential. Proceedings of the Regional Conference on University Teaching (1st, Las Cruces, New Mexico, January 9-10, 1985). Research findings on college instruction are discussed in 43 papers from the first Regional Conference on University Teaching. The papers are grouped under three large theme areas: "Teaching, Technology and the Future" (15 papers), "Computer Designed Instruction & Testing" (13 papers), and "Basic Skills: Dealing with Differences" (15 papers). The proceedings concludes with a special address by Donald C. Roush on "Quest for Quality." Descriptors: Authoring Aids (Programing), Basic Skills, College Instruction, Computer Assisted Instruction

COBB, RICHARD A. (1967). EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN NEW MEXICO AND WEST TEXAS FOR GRADUATES OF A TWO-YEAR PROGRAM IN APPLIED HORTICULTURE AND AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY. IN RESPONSE TO CHANGING OCCUPATIONAL PATTERNS, NEW LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS, THE INCREASING INTEREST OF URBAN STUDENTS, AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A NEW 2-YEAR AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE, A SURVEY OF HORTICULTURE AND AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY OCCUPATIONS WAS CONDUCTED. THE OBJECTIVES WERE TO (1) DETERMINE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES AND TRAINING NEEDS, (2) COMPARE SALARIES, (3) DETERMINE EMPLOYER PREFERENCE FOR EMPLOYEES WITH POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, AND (4) PROJECT EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES. OCCUPATIONAL TITLES WERE FORMULATED FROM THE LITERATURE, QUESTIONNAIRES DESIGNED AND TESTED, EMPLOYER LISTS COMPILED, QUESTIONNAIRES MAILED, NONRESPONDENTS CONTACTED, AND DATA ANALYZED. THE FINDINGS WERE BASED ON THE RESPONSES OF 79 HORTICULTURE AND 98 AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY EMPLOYERS. HORTICULTURAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES WERE GREATEST IN RETAIL NURSERIES AND AT GOLF COURSES. SALARIES AVERAGED $86 PER WEEK, AND AN ESTIMATED 95 MORE WORKERS WOULD BE NEEDED WITHIN 5 YEARS. AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES WERE GREATEST FOR MECHANICS, PARTS CLERKS, AND SALESMEN. SALARIES AVERAGED $100 PER WEEK, AND 448 ADDITIONAL EMPLOYEES WOULD BE NEEDED WITHIN 5 YEARS. MOST HORTICULTURE AND AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY EMPLOYERS WOULD HIRE POSTSECONDARY GRADUATES AT HIGHER SALARIES.   [More]  Descriptors: Agricultural Education, Agricultural Machinery Occupations, Educational Needs, Employment Opportunities

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