Bibliography: New Mexico (page 212 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Marcia J. May, Phillip Hocker, MILES V. ZINTZ, Santa Fe. New Mexico Occupational Research and Development Coordinating Unit, Austin Southwest Educational Development Lab., Washington National Education Commission on Time and Learning, Everett D. Edington, HORACIO ULIBARRI, Jonathan Tregear, and Rayna Green.

Edington, Everett D., Ed.; Hocker, Phillip, Ed. (1969). Development of Vocational Education Programs for American Indians, Conference Proceedings (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, August 18-22, 1969). The purpose of the 5-day institute was to encourage the development of more vocational education programs for the American Indians. Persons in attendance included educators from Federal, state and local levels (both from public schools and the Bureau of Indian Affairs), business and industry representatives, Indian leaders, and employment personnel. The program was divided into 4 major areas: (1) the occupational training needs of the American Indians; (2) the resources available for providing vocational education for the American Indians; (3) existing programs developed to provide vocational education for the American Indians; and (4) development of plans to more adequately meet the vocational education needs of the American Indians. This conference report contains a summary of each of the presentations given at the workshop, a summary of each of the committee reports, and a list of recommendations derived from the institute.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Conference Reports, Cooperative Planning, Educational Programs

National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. (1980). Conference on the Educational and Occupational Needs of American Indian Women (Albuquerque, New Mexico, October 12-13, 1976). Twenty-one American Indian women, selected from state and federal government agencies, professional and research organizations, and academic institutions, began by discussing 10 background papers (presented here in revised form) dealing with: the employment and educational status of American Indian women; the interaction of sex roles and culture in schools; the impact of boarding schools; the effect of tribal-to-urban transition; health problems and the role of American Indian women in health care; foster care and adoption of American Indian children; organizing American Indian women; and factors involved in determining educational needs. Three main issues evolved from the discussions: the lack of accurate research information on American Indian women; the impact of the federal-Indian relationship on the socialization, education, and occupational choices of American Indian women; and the need for more realistic assessment of the educational and occupational needs of American Indian women and of programs to address those needs. Participants reached consensus on 21 recommendations regarding: research topics and methodology; educational policy, programs, and finance; federal hiring practices; and strengthening family structure. Many of these recommendations, still current after four years, are beyond the scope of the National Institute of Education, hence the publication of the proceedings for wider distribution.   [More]  Descriptors: Adoption, American Indian Culture, American Indian Education, American Indians

Southwest Educational Development Lab., Austin, TX. (1983). Institute on Preventive Law and Technology. Report of an Invitational Institute (Santa Fe, New Mexico, April 7, 1983). The proceedings of the second Preventive Law Institute, which focused on the legal aspects of educational uses of technology, are included in this report. Following the preface, two overviews (Thomas M. Griffin, Fred "Rick" W. Weingarten) provide an introduction to preventive law for educators and explore the nature of information technology and its application to education. The following two papers are titled "Negotiating Contracts for the Acquisition of Computer Hardware and Software by State Education Agencies and Some Comments on Copyright and Intellectual Property Rights" (Shannon T. Vale) (an outline of this paper is provided in Appendix B) and "Students' Rights: Privacy and Equal Access and Teachers' Traditional Role and Hesitancy to Change" (Thomas M. Griffin). Next is a summary of the discussions of the following four issues: (1) technological effectiveness and computer literacy, (2) equal access and equity; (3) educational changes and teacher training, and (4) the legal issues of contract negotiation and infringement of patents and copyrights on hardware and software. Following this summary is a report of a roundtable discussion of legislative barriers to full use of new technology in education. A closure session, dealing with suggestions, strategies, and resources, is also reported. Appendix A provides the agenda and descriptions of the presenters, participants, and institute staff.   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Education, Compliance (Legal), Computer Literacy, Contracts

California Univ., Los Angeles. School of Public Health. (1980). Hispanic Health Services Research Conference (Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 5-7, 1979). NCHSR Research Proceedings Series. In order to lay the foundation for the development of an agenda for health services research among Hispanics for the 1980's and beyond, over 200 conference participants drawn from among Hispanic and non-Hispanic health service researchers, health providers, users of research data, health science students, consumers, and representatives of Mexico's Ministry of Health addressed health problems of U.S. Hispanics, identified needed areas of research, and recommended methods of conducting health research among Hispanic populations. Following initial addresses regarding Chicano culture, accountability in Hispanic health services research, and the development of the agenda, participants divided into four task forces to hear and discuss solicited papers and make recommendations. Task force one focused on the impact of national, regional, state, and local policies regarding health services for Hispanics, and recommended research topics in the areas of policy formation, program implementation, and program evaluation. Task force two studied sociocultural influences on health services research and delivery for Hispanics. Task force three focused on resource development strategies for conducting health services research among Hispanic populations. Its recommendations addressed language use, research tools, health science education curricula, and intervention in specific diseases. Task force four studied the facilitation of timely dissemination, assessment, and use of Hispanic health services research. Descriptors: Accountability, Cultural Background, Delivery Systems, Health

HARDWICK, ARTHUR LEE (1967). REPORT OF FINDINGS AND RESULTS OF TECHNICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM WORKSHOP (LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, AUGUST 7-11, 1967). AT THIS WORKSHOP OF INDUSTRIAL REPRESENTATIVE AND TECHNICAL EDUCATORS, A TECHNICIAN WAS DEFINED AS ONE WITH BROAD-BASED MATHEMATICAL AND SCIENTIFIC TRAINING AND WITH COMPETENCE TO SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL SYSTEMS, ENGINEERING, AND OTHER SCIENTIFIC PERSONNEL. HE SHOULD RECEIVE A RIGOROUS, 2-YEAR, POST SECONDARY EDUCATION ESPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR HIS NEEDS. INDUSTRY MEMBERS AGREED THAT HE MUST (1) UNDERSTAND THE TOTAL MANUFACTURING PROCESS IN HIS INDUSTRY, (2) BE ABLE TO COMMUNICATE WELL AND LEARN NEW DATA HANDLING PROCESSES WHEN NECESSARY, (3) KNOW SCIENTIFIC METHOD IN GENERAL AS WELL AS HIS SPECIALTY, (4) HAVE A SOLID BACKGROUND IN PERTINENT MATHEMATICS COURSES, AND (5) HAVE A GENERAL ABILITY TO WORK WITH BOTH THE TOOLS AND THE THEORY OF HIS PARTICULAR INDUSTRY. A COMPLETE CURRICULUM, WITH COURSE SEQUENCE AND DETAILED TEACHING PLAN, IS GIVEN FOR THE FOLLOWING–MECHANICAL DRAFTING AND DESIGN, ARCHITECTURAL AND STRUCTURAL DRAFTING AND DESIGN, CIVIL CONSTRUCTION, ELECTRONICS, ELECTRICAL, INSTRUMENTATION, AND MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGIES, AND DATA PROCESSING AND PROGRAMING. THE WORKSHOP CONCLUDED WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR ESTABLISHING A REGIONAL EVALUATION AND ACCREDITATION ASSOCIATION, TO INCLUDE A TECHNICAL SPECIALIST FROM EACH OF THE FIVE STATES IN THE REGION, AT LEAST THREE INDUSTRIAL REPRESENTATIVES FOR EACH TECHNOLOGY, THE STATE OFFICIAL IN CHARGE OF TECHNICAL EDUCATION, AND FEDERAL PERSONNEL FROM THE REGIONAL OFFICE OF THE U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION.   [More]  Descriptors: Accreditation (Institutions), Course Content, Curriculum Development, Employment Qualifications

May, Marcia J., Ed. (1980). Evaluating Handicapped Children's Early Education Programs. Proceedings of the WESTAR Evaluation Workshop (Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 31-February 2, 1979). Seven papers from a 1979 workshop address program evaluation factors (specifically planning) in the Handicapped Children's Early Education Program. R. Sheehan ("Evaluation Strategies in Early Childhood Education: A National Perspective") summarizes the state of the art and lists seven guidelines, such as that evaluation efforts must reflect qualitative changes in children's performance. In "Practical Program Evaluation: Many Problems and a Few Solutions," O. White details the advantages of curriculum referenced approaches to evaluation, while R. Sheehan ("Measuring Child Progress: Large Group Design and Norm Referenced Alternatives") reviews other evaluation designs. M. Stevens and R. Kroth address problems and issues in "Evaluating Parent Training Programs: Some Considerations." Inservice training is the focus of "Evaluating Staff Development" by L. Lynch and V. Lynch. The final paper ("Evaluating the Impact of Demonstration and Dissemination Activities" by P. Bradley) considers components of impact evaluation studies and describes conditions which should be met before undertaking one. Descriptors: Disabilities, Early Childhood Education, Evaluation Methods, Models

Jones, Dixie James (1972). Evaluation of the Science Education Program for Prospective Secondary Science Teachers at the University of New Mexico. Reported is a case study comparing a science education program for prospective secondary teachers with selected guidelines established by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification (NASDTEC) published in 1971. Nine criterion variables were chosen. Written tests were used to measure competencies. Records were checked for confirmation of semester hours credited. Competencies were determined by examination of mean scores (of various tests given) and the percentage of students who fell above or below them. Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was used to correlate each of the variables. Four single-classification analyses of variance were used to determine if significant differences (.05 level) existed between the Method and Student-Teacher classes, graduates and undergraduates, physical and biological science teachers and the sexes on each criterion variable. Conclusions made noted a negative correlation, although not significant, between hours of science credits and knowledge of prospective teachers in their chosen disciplines. Hours in mathematics were significantly correlated with algebra and trigonometry. All were weak in knowledge of history of science. A high level of competency was indicated in the understanding of science and ability to use processes of science. Descriptors: Course Evaluation, Doctoral Dissertations, Educational Research, Preservice Teacher Education

Edington, Everett D. (1978). Rural Youth: The Neglected Minority. A Presentation in the College of Education Dialogue Series, New Mexico State University. Rural youth are a diverse group not only geographically, but socioeconomically, ethnically, and culturally as well. Historically, the rural student has not achieved as well as his urban counterpart in high school or in post secondary education. There is evidence that this is beginning to change and that rural students are doing as well or better than urban students, but are still slightly behind surburban students. Rural youth are at a disadvantage on the job market; schools have not adequately trained them for the world of work when compared to other youth. The paper also reports on occupational, educational, and residence aspirations and expectations. Comparisons of self concept and values between rural and other students are also discussed. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, American Indians, Aspiration, Cultural Differences

Green, Rayna; And Others (1978). Report and Recommendations: Conference on Mathematics in American Indian Education (Albuquerque, New Mexico, July 7-8, 1977). Participants from all levels of Indian and mathematics education, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and mathematics-related fields met to identify needs for mathematics education among American Indian students of all ages. In general, conferees were more pessimistic about the mathematics competence of American Indian post-secondary students than about the mathematics abilities of elementary students. They noted that the low achievement of American Indians in mathematics and mathematics-related fields was due to lack of training and that negative attitudes of teachers, counselors, and administrators were the most significant barriers to good mathematics education for American Indians. Conferees also noted that most testing determined deficiencies instead of proficiencies. Conferees stressed the need for more and better mathematics education for American Indian students at all levels. Participants noted specific problems and described specific strategies for mathematics education at primary, secondary, and post-secondary levels. They offered recommendations regarding networks of mathematics educators, advocacy efforts, assessment, information dissemination, materials development, and teacher training. Appendices include the conference agenda, a list of participants, a bibliography, and an article by Rayna Green entitled "Math Avoidance: A Barrier to American Indian Science Education and Science Careers." Descriptors: Administrator Attitudes, Adult Education, American Indian Culture, American Indian Education

National Education Commission on Time and Learning, Washington, DC. (1993). Hearings of the National Education Commission on Time and Learning Summary (Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 14-15, 1993). The National Education Commission on Time and Learning (NECT&L) is an independent advisory body authorized by Congress through Public Law 102-62, the Education Council Act of 1991. The commission is undertaking a comprehensive review of the relationship between time and learning in elementary and secondary education, including international comparisons, the use of time in and out of the school, the use of facilities, year-round professional opportunities for teachers, and estimated costs of adopting longer school days and years. Albuquerque Public Schools (APS) adopted year-round education in 1986. Teachers and students in three evaluation cycles have reported improved learning and higher teacher morale. However, "protracted and bitter community opposition" has arisen, particularly among more affluent residents. This paper summarizes proceedings of a hearing where testimonies were offered by various individuals, with a focus on time, learning, and systemic change. The second day of the hearing focused on student learning and motivation, professional development, educational technology, and the needs of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students. A list of witnesses' recommendations, one figure, and a list of participants are included.   [More]  Descriptors: Educational Technology, Elementary Secondary Education, Extended School Day, Extended School Year

Rodriguez del Pino, Salvador, Ed.; And Others (1976). Proceedings of the National Exploratory Conference on Chicano Sociolinguistics (Las Cruces, New Mexico, November 6-8, 1974). Purpose of the conference was to develop a set of priorities for sociolinguistic research on the Chicano community over the next 3 to 5 years. The conference was designed to develop guidelines for such research. Workshops dealt with specific areas of sociolinguistic theory, applied sociolinguistics, and sociolinguistic research policy guidelines. Topics covered were: (1) language varieties and attitudes toward language, (2) sociolinguistics and bilingual education, (3) Spanish language instruction for Chicanos, (4) language creativity in the Chicano community, (5) language policies and the Chicano community, (6) publication and dissemination of Chicano language materials, and (7) guidelines for sociolinguistic research. After the workshops, a plenary session was held to present workshop summaries and resolutions to the group as a whole. Prepared from transcriptions of recorded sessions and from notes taken at the workshop sessions, this report includes a summary of the workshop discussion and recommendations, a brief analysis of the workshop proceedings, a presentation of the final plenary session, and a list of participants. The proceedings appear in both English and Spanish in order to reproduce the actual linguistic setting of the workshops. Where the workshop was conducted primarily in Spanish, a short summary in English is provided.   [More]  Descriptors: Attitudes, Bilingual Education, Community Influence, Conference Reports

ZINTZ, MILES V. (1960). THE ADJUSTMENT OF INDIAN AND NON-INDIAN CHILDREN IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF NEW MEXICO, SECTIONS 1-2. THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO FIND THE BEST MEANS FOR FACILITATING THE ADJUSTMENT OF INDIANS AND NON-INDIANS IN THE PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. TAKING INTO CONSIDERATION DIFFERENCES IN CULTURE, VALUE SYSTEMS, LANGUAGE, MOTIVATIONS, AND BEHAVIOR. A BASIC STATEMENT OF DEFINITION AND EXPLANATION OF CULTURAL DIFFERENCES WAS PREPARED FOR TEACHER USE BASED ON AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO THE PROBLEM (EDUCATIONAL, SOCIOLOGICAL, ANTHROPOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL). PILOT SCHOOLS WHERE INTEGRATION IS OCCURRING WERE SELECTED AS THE EXPERIMENTAL GROUP FOR DESCRIPTIVE STUDY. THE TEACHERS IN THESE SCHOOLS WERE ASSISTED IN RELATING THE DEFINED CULTURAL DIFFERENCES TO THEIR CLASSROOM PROCEDURES. SCHOOL SITUATIONS WERE DESCRIBED IN TERMS OF TEACHER METHODOLOGY, TEACHER-PUPIL BEHAVIOR, PARENT PARTICIPATION, AND MEASURES ON THE SUBJECTS, INCLUDING SOCIOMETRIC STUDIES, STANDARD READING TESTS, AND MEASURES OF ORAL LANGUAGE COMMUNICATION IN ENGLISH. THE CONTROL GROUP WAS DRAWN FROM OTHER INDIAN AND NON-INDIAN CLASSROOM SITUATIONS, INDIAN CLASSROOMS SUPERVISED BY THE INDIAN SERVICE, AND PUBLIC SCHOOL CLASSROOMS ENROLLING NO INDIAN CHILDREN. AN EXTREME AMOUNT OF EDUCATIONAL RETARDATION EXISTED. LACK OF TEACHER UNDERSTANDING OF THE CULTURES OF THE CHILDREN THEY TEACH, READING RETARDATION, DIFFICULTIES IN UNDERSTANDING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE, AND PROBLEMS IN TEACHING SCIENCE AND ARITHMETIC WERE EMPHASIZED. RECOMMENDATIONS WERE MADE FOR FURTHER STUDIES OF CULTURAL DIFFERENCES, BILINGUAL PROBLEMS, AND REMEDIAL EDUCATION. Descriptors: American Indians, Comparative Analysis, Control Groups, Cultural Differences

Tregear, Jonathan, Ed. (1988). Western Regional Workshop on Relevancy in Participant Training: Proceedings (Las Cruces, New Mexico, February 28-March 1, 1988). This document reports on a regional workshop designed to examine ways that relevancy in participant training can be enhanced in the Consortium for International Development and related institutions, and to develop campus-oriented strategies to implement these methods. Papers, discussions, and work group reports are arranged under the following topics: the importance of training; understanding relevancy from the perspectives of key actors in the training process; program and service considerations in enhancing relevancy in training; developing plans to further enhance relevancy training on individual campuses; and accomplishments. Papers presented include: "Consortium for International Development Perspective" (James Collom); "Historically Black University and College Perspective"  (Sammy Comer); "Who Are the Key Actors in Participant Training?" (Paul Huntsberger); "A Non-University Perspective" (Richard Affleck); "A Faculty Member's Perspective" (Jo Ellen Force); "Student Perspectives" (Jean Dakono et al.); and the keynote address by Don Dwyer. Appendices include a list of invited participants, the workshop schedule, the final evaluation questionnaire and responses, an institutional self-assessment survey, a 29-item bibliography and materials list, and a glossary of acronyms. Descriptors: Cooperative Programs, Higher Education, International Cooperation, International Educational Exchange

New Mexico Occupational Research and Development Coordinating Unit, Santa Fe. (1970). Policies and Procedures for the Operation of Vocational-Technical Education in the State of New Mexico. This manual, developed after a number of statewide meetings, sets forth standards to provide a minimum regulation base upon which quality vocational education programs can be built. Policies and procedures are given for: (1) Agricultural Education, (2) Distributive Education, (3) Health Occupations Education, (4) Home Economics Education, (5) Industrial Arts, (6) Local Vocational Directors, (7) Office Education, (8) Research Coordinating Units, (9) Special Needs Programs, and (10) Trade, Technical and Industrial Education Programs. The discussion of each occupational area includes purposes, objectives, program administration, teacher qualifications, program descriptions, teacher education, and in-service education.   [More]  Descriptors: Agricultural Education, Allied Health Occupations Education, Counseling Services, Distributive Education

ULIBARRI, HORACIO (). SOCIAL AND ATTITUDINAL CHARACTERISTICS OF MIGRANT AND EX-MIGRANT WORKERS–NEW MEXICO, COLORADO, ARIZONA AND TEXAS. THE PURPOSE OF THIS RESEARCH REPORT WAS TO COLLECT SOCIOLOGICAL DATA ON THE ATTITUDINAL ORIENTATIONS OF MIGRANT WORKERS. THE SAMPLE CONSISTED OF 65 PERSONS OF SPANISH-AMERICAN HERITAGE. NO ATTEMPT AT RANDOMIZATION WAS MADE IN SELECTING THE SAMPLE. DATA WERE COLLECTED USING AN OPEN-ENDED TYPE INTERVIEW SCHEDULE. THOSE ATTITUDINAL CHARACTERISTICS SPECIFICALLY ISOLATED FOR STUDY WERE FAMILY, HEALTH, ECONOMICS, GOVERNMENT, CHILDREN, RELIGION, AND RECREATION. CONCLUSIONS WERE DRAWN THAT (1) THE SAMPLE SHOWED PRESENT-TIME REWARD EXPECTATIONS IN ALL AREAS, (2) GREAT TIMIDITY AND PASSIVITY WAS SHOWN IN THE AREAS OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND ECONOMICS, (3) SATISFACTION WAS SHOWN IN FAMILY LIFE ALTHOUGH THE NUCLEAR FAMILY HAD IN MOST CASES REPLACED THE TRADITIONAL EXTENDED FAMILY, (4) THEY WERE FUTILITARIAN ABOUT THE EDUCATION OF THEIR CHILDREN, (5) THEY SHOWED TENDENCIES OF RESIGNATION TO THEIR ECONOMIC STATUS, AND (6) THE SAMPLE SHOWED DEFINITE ETHNOCENTRIC TENDENCIES.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Attitudes, Braceros, Children

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