Bibliography: New Mexico (page 208 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Jane Gillentine, Atilano A. Valencia, Santa Fe. New Mexico State Dept. of Education, William R. Young, Carmen Sorge, Al Bettina, Christopher Whittle, William Owen Blair, Albuquerque. Coll. of Education. New Mexico Univ., and Jerry Simmons.

Short, Evelyn H. (1969). Teacher Corps at New Mexico State University. Final Narrative Report: Cycle II. Goals for the 2-year program were 1) to provide immediate assistance to disadvantaged youth at an early age from teacher-interns specially equipped to diagnose their student needs and provide appropriate learning experiences; 2) to provide sufficiently strong preparation for teaching so that interns will achieve enough success to desire to continue teaching disadvantaged youth; 3) to try new approaches leading to progressive development of more effective and efficient teacher education programs. Preservice began with 28 corpsmen in laboratory and seminar classes which emphasized exploring the world of the public school classroom. Inservice combined internship in the elementary schools with campus classes, the two running in parallel sequences of subject matter: reading, math, social studies, science, and physical education. More theoretical courses were reserved for summer to give interns a chance to synthesize their learnings. Program effects on the university include three new courses in the curriculum and greater use of interdepartmental team teaching and video tape equipment. The impact on the schools was also strong particularly in areas of teacher knowledge of new methods and materials, and practice of team teaching. Corpsmen participated in diversified and individualized community activity. Evaluation methods included oral exams, National Teacher Exams, and teaching effectiveness ratings. The program was clearly successful.   [More]  Descriptors: Disadvantaged Youth, Elementary School Teachers, Field Experience Programs, Teacher Education

Toledo, Eulynda (1978). Report & Evaluations on Opportunities Conference (Albuquerque Indian School, New Mexico, January 19, 1978). The conference was attended by 53 high school seniors and 65 parents, teachers, administrators, and counselors from Albuquerque Public Schools, Los Lunas, Bernalillo, Jemez, Grants, and Albuquerque Indian School. After an opening address and two speakers, participants attended three workshops. In the first workshop, a panel of students presented the occupational areas of telecommunications, electronics, food preparation, offset-lithography, optical technology, engineering, dental program, drafting, and business education. General information on college life and financial aid was presented by five students in the second workshop. The last workshop covered current legal, economic, political, social, and educational Indian issues. After each workshop, participants completed evaluation forms. Some responses to these evaluations indicated that: the majority felt the workshops had informed them of some important matters they will face in vocational school or college, as Indian students; the majority felt that establishing goals was the most important issue they should be concerned about before entering a vocational school; 21 students were interested in entering college; many felt that financial aid was the most important issue they should be concerned about before entering college. After the workshops, displays and booths were opened to the participants. The addresses were given during an evening session. Suggestions were for future workshops on financial aid, career education, or supportive services. Descriptors: American Indian Education, American Indians, College Preparation, Educational Opportunities

Valencia, Atilano A., Ed. (1974). Selected Readings in Multicultural Education. The New Mexico Highlands University Multicultural Education Series. One in a series on cultural pluralism and multicultural education, this collection of 10 brief articles focuses on bilingual education with much of the material specific to Spanish-English programs. Dennis Wilson discusses Indian self determination and the task of preserving Indian culture while solving contemporary Indian problems. Lorenzo Gonzalez contributes two articles in Spanish; one depicts the Chicano as unique representative of both Latin and Anglo culture and urges complete bilingualism; the second is a collection of folk wisdom. Three articles by Atilano Valencia discuss bilingual education models, training for bilingual teachers, and the need for school and community commitment if bilingual education programs are to be successful. Cecilio Orozco describes and critiques three bilingual program models. David Conde reviews the history of bilingual education and points out the overall failure of compensatory bilingual programs; he emphasizes the need for education that considers the socio-cultural characteristics of the students and their community. Dolores Gonzalez discusses cultural pluralism and the elementary school curriculum and describes the inservice teacher training necessary to implement an innovative bilingual-bicultural program. A children's story by Julia Sanchez tells of an Anglo boy's first visit with a Chicano family and his introduction to a new language and new customs. Descriptors: American Indians, Biculturalism, Bilingual Education, Bilingual Students

THOMPSON, JOHN F.; THOMPSON, MRS. JOHN F. (1965). THE NONGRADED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, NEW MEXICO WESTERN STATES SMALL SCHOOLS PROJECT. THE NONGRADED SCHOOL IS DEFINED AS A SCHOOL WHICH PROVIDES FOR THE CONTINUOUS, UNBROKEN, UPWARD PROGRESSION OF ALL PUPILS, FROM THE SLOWEST TO THE MOST ABLE. THIS TYPE OF SCHOOL WAS ORGANIZED AT THE LARGO CANYON SCHOOL (APPROXIMATELY 50 STUDENTS IN GRADES 1-8) IN THE JEMEZ MOUNTAIN SCHOOL DISTRICT. THE OBJECTIVES OF THIS PROGRAM WERE–(1) TO ENSURE THAT EACH STUDENT MASTERS NECESSARY BASIC SKILLS AND ESSENTIAL SUBJECT MATTER, (2) TO DEVELOP INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR INDEPENDENT STUDY AND PROGRESS, (3) TO ENCOURAGE SATISFACTION IN LEARNING, AND (4) TO ENCOURAGE EACH STUDENT TO DEVELOP HIS OWN PARTICULAR TALENTS TO THE MAXIMUM. ACHIEVEMENT AND MENTAL ABILITIES TESTS HAVE BEEN GIVEN TO ALL CHILDREN, WHICH SHOW SATISFACTORY PROGRESS. HOWEVER, THE GREATEST ACCOMPLISHMENT HAS BEEN IN THE CHANGED ATTITUDES TOWARD SCHOOL, AND IN DOING GOOD WORK.   [More]  Descriptors: Achievement, Administration, Classes (Groups of Students), Elementary Schools

New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe. (1974). Alternatives: A Survey of Title III, ESEA, Projects in New Mexico. This survey provides a moderately detailed description of each of 13 projects funded under 1965 Elementary Secondary Education Act Title III. Freedom High School is an alternative school. The Resource Room for Visually Impaired Children was established in 1972. The Remediating Motor Dysfunction project helps elementary school students to enter a regular classroom. The Bilingual Bicultural Teacher Training Network trains specialized teachers. The Televised Cultural Awareness in Carlsbad project uses television in Kindergarten through Second Grade classrooms. The School Bus Classroom project uses the hours spent by children on buses by providing them with educational experiences via video. The Espanola Reading Centers is an exemplary remedial reading program, it is stated here. The Student Tutors for Individualized Instruction project is located at Floyd Elementary School. The Educational Services Center was designed to provide poor rural school districts with needed services. The Cooperative Guidance Program serves all students and parents. The Parent-Kindergarten Liaison Program was begun in the Pecos Independent Schools during the 1972-73 school year. The Roswell Independent Schools Study focuses on the feasibility of extended school year plans. The Special Education Instructional Materials centers are located in four communities.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Teachers, Compensatory Education, Educational Innovation, Educational Resources

Young, William R., III (1980). New Mexico Dropout Study, 1977-78 and 1978-79. Based on surveys tallying statewide enrollment and dropout figures by grade, sex, ethnicity, school and district, of 83,832 students enrolled in 1977-78 in 147 schools in 86 districts, 9,059 students (9.75%) were dropouts; of 86,117 enrolled in 150 schools in 88 disricts in 1978-79, 8,069 students (8.56%) dropped out of school. For both years, grade 9 had the lowest dropout rate and grade 11 the highest. In 1977-78, 10.6% of males dropped out, as opposed to 8.8% of females; in 1978-79 the gap narrowed, with 9.2% for males and 7.9% for females. Pregnancy-caused dropouts increased slightly between the two years. Anglos had lowest dropout rates in both years (8.1% and 6.9%), while Native Americans had the highest (13.0% and 13.5%). Unlike Anglos or Hispanics, whose dropout rates peaked in grade 11 for both years, the rate for Native Americans peaked in grade 9 (1977-78) or 10 (1978-79). The Black dropout rate decreased substantially from 10.5% to 7.8%. Although districts with high minority enrollments often had high dropout rates, two such districts showed that this should not be assumed. Maximum dropout rates for districts increased between 1977-78 (17.3%) and 1978-79 (27.8%); number of districts with no dropouts increased from 3 to 4. Descriptors: American Indians, Black Students, Dropout Characteristics, Dropout Rate

Pascual, Henry W. (1968). New Mexico Department of Education Evaluative Criteria: Division of Foreign Languages. Based on national, state, and local objectives, this rating sheet, designed for foreign language departmental evaluation, is divided into seven areas of appraisal: philosophy and objectives, program organization, equipment for instructional purposes, curriculum planning and program evaluation, teacher preparation, counseling, and guidance. Blanks for comments and a program evaluation summary are provided.   [More]  Descriptors: Counselor Evaluation, Course Objectives, Curriculum Evaluation, Departments

Blair, William Owen; And Others (1985). New Mexico Dance Education Competencies for Grades 3, 5, 8 and School Exit Level. The dance education competencies presented in this guide are intended to be statements of ability that can be expected at certain stages of a child's development which can be observed and are sequential in nature. The competencies may be used as tools by which curriculum decisions can be made; however, they may be revised and adjusted to reflect the changing abilities of students. Competency statements are made for the following areas of dance education: (1) body awareness; (2) rhythm; (3) spatial awareness; (4) locomotor patterns; (5) self exploration/improvisation; (6) choreography; (7) social interaction; (8) fitness; (9) knowledge; (10) aesthetic appreciation; and (11) cultural awareness. Descriptors: Aesthetic Education, Cultural Awareness, Dance Education, Elementary Secondary Education

Kuh, William; Simmons, Jerry; Sorge, Carmen; Whittle, Christopher (1997). Group Study on Adult Learning at the Explora Science Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. This research examines some of the factors that influence the learning process in an informal science education setting such as the Explora Science Center. Goals of the study include the completion of a qualitative as well as quantitative study on adult learning in an informal, hands on setting, observing and determining the learner characteristics which are crucial to the learning experience, and determining the multicultural use factors in a culturally diverse community. Statistical information on who visits which exhibits for what period of time is included. Age and gender are represented in the data displays and findings indicate that there are age and ethnic effects in adult visitor interaction with the exhibits. Numerous data tables are included to lend additional support to the research project. (Contains 29 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Learning, Community Resources, Educational Facilities, Exhibits

Gillentine, Jane; And Others (1981). Evaluating Library Services. New Mexico State Library Occasional Paper No. 8. Developed to assist librarians in the measurement and evaluation of the library's ability to provide services, this guide suggests a number of evaluation techniques that may be used once the reasons for a study have been clearly determined and locally peculiar conditions have been taken into account. The first section explains methods for assessing library use, offers procedures for measuring activities that occur in the library including room and equipment use, and outlines techniques for determining in-library circulation and for maintaining library program records. The following section explains several methods for evaluating the library's collection, and the final section introduces the basic concept of sampling as an evaluation tool for library usage and collection study.  Two charts summarizing assessment of library use methods and collection evaluation methods are included, along with a table of random numbers and lists of suggested readings for each section. Descriptors: Evaluation Methods, Guidelines, Institutional Evaluation, Librarians

Lewis, Linda K. (1978). University of New Mexico General Libraries Guide to the Microform Collections. The contents–sets of archives, books, documents, manuscripts, music, periodicals, plays and scores–and indexing of the university collection of microforms are described in this guide. When available, the following information has been included: call number, card catalog entry, description, format, indexes, publisher, and review. Arranged alphabetically by the title of the collection with indexes by personal name and subject, the name index includes alternative names of some sets, authors, compilers, editors, and some secondary collections included in larger sets. Descriptors: Catalogs, College Libraries, Library Collections, Library Guides

New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. Coll. of Education. (1967). The New Elementary Teacher Education Program at the University of New Mexico. This paper describes a program (now in its second year) which unites preservice and inservice education in a continuing educational program for elementary teachers involving (1) an approach to instructional theory and classroom practice which combines both in a single module of time; (2) the utilization of satellite public schools for laboratory experiences and the staffing of these schools by resident clinical supervisors who coordinate the university program and teach inschool, inservice seminars; and (3) the utilization of teaching-supervising teams consisting of university professors, university instructors, graduate students in teacher education, and highly successful public school teachers who are participants in a teacher exchange program between the university and the cooperating school system. Included with the program description are a list of objectives and notes on program development, personnel, evaluation, and contribution to the improvement of teacher education. Appended are a summary budget and charts depicting student and personnel activities in the junior and senior modules.   [More]  Descriptors: Affiliated Schools, College School Cooperation, Elementary School Teachers, Practicums

New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. (1977). Ethnic Minorities at the University of New Mexico. A Presidential Progress Report. Based on statistics for the fall of 1974, minority students at the university form a percentage of the total student body that is three times the national average at undergraduate and preprofessional levels of education, and twice that at the graduate level. The university has the highest minority enrollment percentage among major state universities. During 1975-76, UNM awarded $10,000,000 in student financial aid to minorities, allocated $4,600,000 for minority-emphasis recruitment-retention programs, and spent over $140,000 on three ethnic student centers. However, the minority enrollment does not match the percentage of minorities in the state's population.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, College Students, Cultural Centers, Enrollment Rate

Bettina, Al (1968). Vocational-Technical Education in New Mexico. Work Project No. 7. A design for the future of vocational and technical education was developed utilizing existing situations, manpower development data, and vocational-technical enrollments as supporting evidence. Major recommendations were for–(1) extending some form of vocational education into the grade and junior high schools, (2) implementing the cluster concept for low ability student occupational education, vocational education and technical education, (3) extension of cooperative part-time programs into the trade, agricultural, service, and health areas, (4) development of counselor inservice training programs, and (5) expansion of area vocational-technical centers. Program effectiveness must be evaluated according to the percentage of trainees who work at the occupation for which they are trained, how well the trainees do in their respective occupations, and how well the trainees as individuals are satisfied with the training they receive.   [More]  Descriptors: Evaluation Criteria, Program Development, Program Improvement, Technical Education

Irvine, Patricia, Ed.; And Others (1991). The Naturalization Process in New Mexico. A Guide for ESL Teachers and Advocates. This guide provides an overview of the naturalization process and what it means to Hispanic immigrants, describes techniques for integrating English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) and civics/history content in multilevel classes, offers directions for filling out the naturalization forms and completing the legal steps to naturalization, and provides strategies for getting through the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) oral interview and literacy test. The manual consists of six articles by different authors, and appended materials. The articles include: "U.S. Citizenship–Who Needs It?" (Patricia Irvine); "Using Grids to Integrate ESL and Content" (Jamie Treat); "'Yes, I Can Write English': Preparing ESL Students for the Literacy Exam" (Pat Bonilla); "Visual Aids: Islands in a Sea of Print" (Judy Kaul); "Naturalization: The Application (Form N-400)" (Jane Kochman); and "Naturalization: The Interview" (Dan Weber). Appended materials include: an outline of steps in the naturalization process; INS Forms N-400 (application to file petition for naturalization), G-325 (biographic information), and N-430 (request that applicant appear for interview); a chart of the rights of U.S. citizens; 100 INS civics questions, with answers, in English and Spanish; and 20 INS statements, in English, for literacy practice. (MSE)   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Citizenship Education, Compliance (Legal), English (Second Language)

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