Bibliography: New Mexico (page 205 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Larry Beck, ALEXANDER L. RANDOMSKI, Matthew T. Downey, Barbara Baldwin, Washington Commission on Civil Rights, JoAnn Wilson, Albuquerque Southwestern Cooperative Educational Lab., ANITA U. MILLS, Steven Haymes, and Boulder Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education.

Wilson, JoAnn (1981). A Study of the Relationship between Postsecondary Education and Economic Development in Selected States. The organizational and working relationships between postsecondary education and economic development in selected states were investigated, with emphasis on identifying state-level coordinated programs in 12 geographically diverse states known to be active in linking education to economic development (Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Louisiana, Minnesota, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, and Wisconsin). States neighboring Arizona (California, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah) were also evaluated. Letters requesting information from state agencies preceded telephone follow-ups. It was found that most of the states utilize postsecondary education to some extent in their state-level development strategies. Only two states (Nevada and Oregon) seem to rely chiefly on local efforts to link postsecondary education to economic development. The remaining states offer state-level coordinated programs that are discussed under the following headings: title, history, program description, administrative structure, staff size, funding, average cost per trainee, agency links, and the comparative role of Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) programs. None of the states had a comprehensive program linking economic development with all sectors of postsecondary education. Typically, state-sponsored training was provided by the public sub-baccalaureate sectors for entry-level jobs. Only three states made use of their public colleges and universities and in only one was private postsecondary trade and technical schools utilized. No truly comprehensive program was identified and no state had designated a single source of occupational training information. For each of the 16 states, information is presented on program history, services, structure, and other program areas.   [More]  Descriptors: College Role, Community Colleges, Economic Development, Education Work Relationship

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Boulder, CO. (1992). The Higher Education-Economy Tie: A Sampling of Exemplary Programs in the West. Higher Education and the Economy of the West. Working Paper #3. This paper, one of a series from the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education's project "Higher Education and the Economy of the West," describes 31 programs in 16 western states that illustrates higher education's contribution to the economy. Four school-university partnerships are described: the Pueblo School District 60/University of Southern Colorado Alliance, the California Academic Partnership program, the Puget Sound Educational Consortium, and the Bakersfield (California) College Tech Forestry program. State government-university initiatives include: the Center for the Advancement and Study of Tourism (South Dakota), the Morrison Institute for Public Policy (Arizona), the Utah Partnership for Educational and Economic Development, Total Quality Improvement in the North Dakota University system, and the Spokane Intercollegiate Research and Technology Institute. The small business outreach programs include: the South Dakota Business and Education Institute, the Center for Business and Economic Research (Nevada), the Idaho Small Business Development Center, the Small Business Development Center Network (Hawaii), Minnesota SURE Access, the Montana Entrepreneurship Center, and the Spokane Business Incubator. Technology transfer and workforce training programs listed include: the Engineering and Environmental Research Center (South Dakota), Optical Sciences Center (Arizona), Project S.U.C.C.E.S.S. (Hawaii), Labor Education and Research Center (Oregon), Public Utility Research and Training Institute (Wyoming), and Maricopa County (Arizona) Community Colleges. Outreach programs for rural and underserved populations are: the Alaska Native Health Center Program, the Regional Services Institute (Oregon), Area Health Education Centers (Arizona and New Mexico), the Central Oregon Consortium for Higher Education, and Electronic Distance Education (Utah). There are four regional initiatives: the WAMI (Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho) medical education programs, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, NorthWestNet, and the Western Institute of Nursing. A list of all the programs recommended, by state, is appended. (Contains 20 references.) Descriptors: College School Cooperation, Consortia, Cooperative Programs, Distance Education

Rutledge, Mark; Haymes, Steven (1981). Student Perceptions of Religion and Campus. (A Survey: Fall Semester, 1981.). Perceptions and attitudes of University of New Mexico (UNM) students regarding the university, their church, and the campus ministry were surveyed in fall 1981 through telephone interviews. All of the 40 students were affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Most students (82.5 percent) were members of some church, and most attended one or more times per month. Of these, nearly one-third were involved in church activities in addition to attendance at worship. Students seemed to participate far less in any campus extracurricular organized activities than they did in church. For example, only 30 percent reported involvement in any organized campus activities, and of these only 7.5 percent were involved in religious activities. Many students attended church for reasons of social habit or out of a need for some kind of group affiliation. Many of the students saw themselves as being quite religious. On a scale of 1-10, most students ranked themselves 5, and a strong majority (62.5 percent) ranked themselves 7 or above. However, they perceived other students as being less religious than they were. Forty-five percent reported that their church involvement had decreased since beginning college, mainly because of being busy with school. Students in the sample were largely freshmen and sophomores, half lived on campus, while only about 5 percent of UNM students overall live on campus. All of those reporting a change in their religious attitudes since beginning college indicate some change in a positive direction; they experienced a strengthening of religious attitude because of personal experiences, or they had become more tolerant of others. A sample questionnaire and responses and a newsletter article on the research are appended. Descriptors: Churches, College Students, Higher Education, Religion

Shainline, Michael (1987). Cohort Survival and Withdrawal Study District Report. At the completion of the 1986-87 school year, the Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public Schools (APS) conducted a cohort survival and withdrawal study to follow-up 5,976 students who had begun the ninth grade within the district in 1983-84. Current records were matched with those from the 1983-84 school year to determine whether members of the identified cohort had graduated, were still enrolled within the APS, had dropped out, or had transferred to another school district. Findings indicate that: (1) 61.8% of the students had graduated from the APS; (2) 7.9% were still enrolled in the APS program; (3) 19.6% had dropped out (21.3% of the identified males and 17.9% of the females had dropped out); (4) although 8.4% more males than females began the ninth grade in the APS in 1983-84, 8.6% more females than males graduated by the end of the 1986-87 school year; (5) Eldorado High School had the highest percentage of students who had either graduated or were still enrolled, followed by Sandia and Valley high schools; and (6) Albuquerque High School had the lowest percentage of students who had either graduated or were still enrolled, followed by West Mesa and Highland high schools. The cohort dropout rates by ethnicity were: Asian and other–12.9%; Anglo–16.3%; Black–22.9%; Hispanic–23.8%; and Native American–29.3%. Ten percent of the cohort had transferred to other school districts; 24% of these students transferred to districts within the state, while 76% transferred outside the state. Three data tables and three graphs are provided. Descriptors: American Indians, Asian Americans, Black Students, Cohort Analysis

Southwestern Cooperative Educational Lab., Albuquerque, NM. (1969). Proceedings of the Conference on the Use and Role of Teacher Aides (February 10-11, 1969). This document contains 21 addresses, case studies, and other conference presentations, most of them by representatives of the state departments of education and state universities in New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arizona, Colorado, Arkansas, and Texas: "Measuring Educational Progress"; "Teacher Aides–Who Needs 'Em?"; "Training of Auxiliaries and Professionals Together for Effective Team Functioning"; "The New Careers Movement–Challenge to Education"; "Arkansas' Aide-Teacher Inservice Training Approach"; "Suggested Guidelines for Supplementary Educational Personnel with Emphasis on the Relationship of Teacher and Aides in Adult Basic Education"; "Guadalupe on the Move"; "Training of Teacher Aides To Suit the Needs of Schools"; "Programed Tutoring with Teacher Aides"; "Preparing Trainers of Teacher Aides"; "The Use of Counselor Aides for Urban Areas or Inner-City Schools–from the Pilot Projects of the Roosevelt School, Phoenix"; "The Use of Volunteers in School Districts"; "The Use of Aides in Navajo Area Schools"; "Media Center Aides in Support of Instruction, Oklahoma City Public Schools"; "Attracting and Qualifying Personnel To Meet Critical Manpower Needs in Colorado"; "Teacher Aides in Action"; "The 30-Hour Program on the Training Session for Teacher Aides Conducted by the University of Arkansas"; "Training of Indian-Speaking Aides for the Head Start Program"; "Teacher Aide Training at a Local Level."   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, American Indians, Bilingual Teacher Aides, Inservice Teacher Education

Downey, Matthew T. (1994). Writing To Learn History in the Intermediate Grades–Defining and Assessing Historical Thinking: A Technical Report. Project 2. A multi-year study examined whether elementary school students can engage in historical thinking in a meaningful way, and what kind of writing activities best serve this purpose. Subjects were 17 students of varying language proficiency levels selected as the focus of research from the entire class of 31 primarily Hispanic and African-American students in a split fourth/fifth grade classroom in an inner-city school in Oakland, California. Data on historical thinking was collected during a 6-week period when the students were engaged in a unit on American Indians and Spanish colonization in the Southwest. The unit included two writing assignments: a "day in the life" activity concerning American Indian life, and a mock correspondence describing colonial New Mexico. Writing assignments were evaluated and analyzed. Results indicated that: (1) most students wrote quite detailed narratives for the first assignment, but most stopped far short of perspective taking; (2) several of the students had difficulty, in their role as Spanish colonists in the second assignment, distancing themselves from the Indians; and (3) more of the students succeeded in the second assignment than in the first in creating characters who thought and acted in culturally and historically appropriate ways. Findings suggest that at least some fifth-grade students with somewhat limited language skills can engage in perspective taking. The most persuasive explanation for the students' marginal success may be that most of them lacked sufficient knowledge about how things were done in the past to succeed in the assignment. (Contains 24 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Characterization, Content Area Writing, Elementary School Students

Latin American Research and Service Agency, Denver, CO. (1989). Hispanic Knowledge, Attitudes and Beliefs about AIDS: A Survey in Four Southwestern States. This document comprises a report on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) of Hispanic Americans residing in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas. A total of 2,400 people (600 per state) were interviewed by telephone between December 1988 and January 1989. The following sample characteristics are reported: (1) 55 percent were female; (2) 51 percent were between 25 and 44 years old; (3) 68 percent were married; (4) the average household size was 3.7 persons; (5) 33 percent were high school graduates and another 31 percent had some postsecondary education; (6) 77 percent were born in the United States; (7) 75 percent of those not born in the United States were raised in Mexico; and (8) 50 percent had a bicultural orientation, 38 percent had a Hispanic cultural orientation, and 11 percent had an Anglo cultural orientation. The following findings are reported: (1) 92 percent had read of, heard of, or seen AIDS; (2) television, magazines, and newspapers were the most frequently identified sources of both AIDS and general health information; (3) television was identified as the single most helpful source of information; (4) English-language television was identified by half as the single most helpful source of information; and (5) of the 44 percent who had received the Surgeon General's pamphlet about AIDS, 88 percent had read all or some of it, 96 percent of the readers understood it, and 59 percent of them talked to someone else about it. Statistical data are included on 21 tables and 11 charts. The following material is appended: (1) a discussion of the survey methodology; (2) the survey questionnaire in both English and Spanish; (3) a postcard sent to prospective participants; (4) lists of sources of AIDS and general health information; (5) a list of seven references; and (6) a brief description of the Latin American Research and Service Agency (LARASA). Descriptors: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, Attitudes, Federal Programs, Health

Nelson, Mary Carroll (1971). Pablita Verarde: The Story of an American Indian. Pablita Velarde Hardin is a famous Tewa Indian artist, born in Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico in 1918. She has helped revive and reinterpret traditional Indian art forms, preserving both for the pleasure of people today and for future generations. From ancient tales told to her by her father she has written and illustrated "Old Father, the Story Teller", a book of Tewa legends. Pablita's life has been one of conflict between her Indian heritage and her life in the Anglo world. Her years were much like those of any other Tewa baby, although when she was three her mother died. She was educated in Indian boarding schools and in the eighth grade received her first art training at the Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding school in Santa Fe. There Indian children were taught basic art concepts but were encouraged to develop their own art styles and to reflect their own cultures. By the end of the first year her detailed paintings of pueblo life were chosen for exhibit in Chicago and Washington, D.C. She graduated from high school in 1936, a feat seldom accomplished by girls of her tribe at that time. At 23 she married Herb Hardin, an accomplished Anglo, and became the mother of two, Herby and Helen, the latter being an artist in her own right. She kept to her art resulting in fame for her murals and paintings. Her work is related to her Indian culture and she has attempted to preserve Santa Clara Pueblo culture; she uses her art to interpret Indian life. Today she is the most famous Indian woman painter in the world. This biography is written for grades five and up.  Descriptors: Adolescent Literature, American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Artists

Maldonado, Bonnie Buckley (1972). The Impact of Skin Color By Sex on Self Concept of Low Sicioeconomic Level Mexican-American High School Students. The purposes of this dissertation were to determine (1) if self-concept is affected by the independent conditions of skin color and sex and (2) if self-concept is affected by the interactions resulting from the variables of skin color and sex. Two hypotheses were tested: (1) that there would be no significant main effects between the variables of sex and students' perceptions of skin color on the self-concept of Mexican Americans from a low socioeconomic level and (2) that there would be no significant interaction effects between sex and skin color on the self-concept. This study was conducted in 2 New Mexico public high schools during 1971-72 and consisted of 174 Mexican American 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students for whom 4 data indices were available (scores on the Tennessee Self Concept Scale, scores on Hollingshead's Two-Factor Index of Social Position, classification as to skin color, and sex). Interviews with the subjects by the investigator provided information pertaining to self-perception of skin color in addition to the investigator's rating. Color transparencies were made of the hand and arm of each subject for evaluation by 1 Anglo and 2 Mexican American judges. Analysis of variance was done to determine any significant main effects and interactions followed by an After F Test. Where significant F ratios were obtained, the Neuman Keul's Multiple Comparison Test was applied to determine significant differences. Pearson's Coefficient of Concordance was used to determine significant correlations between the students', judges', and investigator's ratings of skin color. Findings partially supported hypothesis 1 and found no significant interaction effects in support of hypothesis 2.   [More]  Descriptors: Analysis of Variance, Doctoral Dissertations, High School Students, Individual Characteristics

Lillibridge, Fred (1995). Using a Simple Economic Impact Model To Document Value to Policy Makers. At the request of state legislature, the two-year branch campus of New Mexico State University at Alamogordo (NMSU-A) began using an economic impact model developed by the Eastern Association of College and University Business Officers (EACUBO) to document accountability. The EACUBO Model uses information about the institution and economic data from the local study area to produce countywide data for the college; statewide data for the college; and countywide results of economic impact. The model requires that two multipliers be selected: the first to estimate local college indirect impact; and an employment multiplier which reflects the number of jobs related to the institution. In summer 1993, NMSU-A utilized the EACUBO model to determine the economic impact on Otero county of NMSU-A and four other public educational systems. The total direct economic impact was calculated to be $24,521,994, while economic impact after adding the multiplier was calculated at $51,011,893. The total economic impact of NMSU-A was determined to be $14,411,190, with students providing 72% of the impact. The total number of jobs created due to the 5 institutions was 1,154, with 372 of these resulting directly from NMSU-A. However, exclusions from the model of such factors as expansion of the credit base of local banks due to college-related deposits, expenditures by visitors, and state and local taxes paid by employees result in an underestimation of the actual economic impact. (Contains 10 references.) (Data tables are appended.)   [More]  Descriptors: Accountability, Community Colleges, Computer Software, Economic Impact

MILLS, ANITA U.; RANDOMSKI, ALEXANDER L. (1964). FAMILY INCOME AND RELATED CHARACTERISTICS AMONG LOW-INCOME COUNTIES AND STATES. THE PRIMARY PURPOSES ARE TO DIRECT ATTENTION TO COUNTY UNITS AS ONE APPROACH IN ANALYZING THE GEOGRAPHY OF THE POOR, AND TO PROVIDE A RESOURCE TOOL FOR VIEWING THE LOWEST FIFTH (QUINTILE) OF COUNTY UNITS IN THE CONTEXT OF STATE, REGIONAL, AND NATIONAL MEASURES OF POVERTY AND DEPENDENCY. MUCH ATTENTION WAS GIVEN TO THE URBAN SETTING WHERE 70 PERCENT OF THE NATION'S POPULATION IS CONCENTRATED AND WHERE, BY INCOME MEASURES, SOME 54 PERCENT OF THE POOR FAMILIES ARE LOCATED. IN THE NONURBAN AREAS, WITH 30 PERCENT OF THE POPULATION, 46 PERCENT OF THE POOR FAMILIES ARE DISPERSED OVER A BROAD GEOGRAPHIC AREA. ALTHOUGH HEAVILY CONCENTRATED IN THE SOUTHEAST, SIGNIFICANT POVERTY POCKETS ARE ALSO FOUND IN TEXAS, NEW MEXICO, THE DAKOTAS, AND ALASKA. THE CHANCES OF BEING POOR IN THE UNITED STATES ARE CLOSELY RELATED TO RESIDENTIAL LOCATION AND WHETHER ONE IS WHITE OR NONWHITE. THE NONWHITE FARM FAMILY FALLS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE INCOME DISTRIBUTION PATTERN. THE URBAN NONWHITE FAMILY HAS ABOUT THE SAME CHANCE FOR BEING VERY POOR AS DOES THE RURAL WHITE FAMILY. THE RATE OF DEVELOPMENT OF THE POORER COUNTY UNITS CLEARLY INDICATES THAT IN SOME COUNTIES THE RATE OF INCREASE IN MEDIAN FAMILY INCOME WILL HAVE TO BE RAISED IF IT IS TO KEEP PROPORTIONATE PACE WITH THE NATIONAL RISE IN FAMILY MEDIAN INCOME. THE DATA PRESENTED HERE INDICATE THE NATURE, EXTENT, AND LOCATION OF THE NATION'S MOST SERIOUS POVERTY, IN THE FORM OF GRAPHS, FIGURES, TABLES AND ILLUSTRATIONS DERIVED FROM VARIOUS SOURCES. THE DATA ARE DIVIDED INTO THREE MAIN SECTIONS–MAJOR FAMILY INCOME PATTERNS, LOW-INCOME STATES AND COUNTIES, AND TRENDS AND OUTLOOK. Descriptors: Family Characteristics, Family Income, Interstate Programs, Low Income Counties

Commission on Civil Rights, Washington, DC. (1972). The Excluded Student; Educational Practices Affecting Mexican Americans in the Southwest. Mexican American Education Study. In this U.S. Commission on Civil Rights report, denial of equal opportunity to Mexican Americans by exclusionary practices in public schools is examined through information gathered at a Commission on Civil Rights hearing and a subsequent 1969 survey of school districts in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas having enrollments of more than 10% Spanish-surnamed students. Although some innovations oriented to closing the educational gap between Anglos and Mexican Americans were found, school systems generally had not recognized the culture and tradition of the Mexican American and had not adopted policies and programs enabling Mexican American students to participate fully in the benefits of the educational process. Of 3 types of programs that schools may use to meet the English language difficulty of Spanish-speaking students (bilingual education, English as a second language, and remedial reading), bilingual education was observed to be potentially the most advantageous to both Anglo and non-English-speaking students; however, bilingual programs were found in only 6.5% of the schools–possibly because of the great curricular change required. Suppression of the Spanish language was found to be the most overt area of cultural exclusion, followed by exclusion of relevant course content in terms of Indo-Hispanic history, heritage, and folklore. Exclusion of Mexican American community involvement was also noted: few school districts availed themselves of community advisory boards, contacts with the community, community relations specialists, and/or Mexican American educational consultants. Related documents are ED 052 849 and ED 056 821.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Community Involvement, Community Role, Cultural Awareness

Baldwin, Barbara, Ed. (1995). Pathways from Poverty, Western Wire. Articles in this theme issue are based on presentations at the Pathways from Poverty Workshop held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on May 18-25, 1995. The event aimed to foster development of a network to address rural poverty issues in the Western Rural Development Center (WRDC) region. Articles report on outcomes from the Pathways from Poverty workshop including team plans for addressing poverty in their area; the importance of social capital in building community; Native American economic development efforts that incorporate sustainability and cultural relevance; the effect of capitalism on the Palau islands; how sharing resources has enabled low-income families in American Samoa to maintain economic stability; demographic, economic, and educational factors that affect the status of Latinos in the United States, with implications for the American economy; a study of single-parent families and welfare reform; rural minorities and the relationship between employment and poverty; and the importance of rural studies in gaining understanding of rural poverty. Articles include: (1) "Pathways from Poverty" (Jane Brass); (2) "Social Capital" (Marie Cirillo); (3) "The Circle of Development and Indigenous Peoples" (Sherry Salway Black); (4) "Palauan Perspective" (Ayano Baules); (5) "Poverty: A Matter of Values" (Carol S. Whitaker); (6) "Focus on Latinos" (Refugio I. Rochin, Jose A. Rivera); (7) "Is Marriage the Solution? The Single-Parent Family and Welfare Reform" (Janet M. Fitchen); (8) "Employment Hardship and Rural Minorities" (Leif Jensen); and (9) "The Social Scientist and Rural America" (Emery N. Castle). The journal also includes updates on projects sponsored by WRDC and upcoming conferences.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Capitalism, Change Strategies, Community Development

Lillibridge, Fred; Beck, Larry (1995). Are Students Who Complete Questionnaires Different from Students Who Don't?. In an effort to determine differences between students who respond to surveys and those who do not, New Mexico State University at Alamogordo (NMSU-A) undertook a study of students in fall 1992. Students were asked to complete an 18-item questionnaire while waiting in lines during registration. The 1,618 out of 2,114 (76.5%) students who completed the survey, completed registration, and attended classes were compared to the 496 (23.5%) of students who enrolled, attended classes but did not complete the survey. The study used data from the NMSU-A Student Information Files to determine characteristics of the two groups. Study results included the following: (1) while students in the 16-22 and 23-29 age groups were more likely not to complete the survey than was expected, the difference between other age groups was not significant; (2) no significant differences were found in ethnicity or enrollment status (i.e., continuing, readmitted, first-time, or transfer students) between responders and non-responders; (3) females were more likely to complete the survey than males; (4) full-time students and students taking between 6 and 12 credit hours were more likely to complete the survey; and (5) completers had a slightly higher grade point average (3.01) than those who did not (2.97). Study results suggest that students who respond to surveys may differ from those who do not and that researchers should exercise caution. (Contains 23 references.) (Twenty-two tables and the survey instrument are appended.)   [More]  Descriptors: Community Colleges, Comparative Analysis, Data Collection, Higher Education

JOHNSTON, DENIS F.; METHEE, GEORGE R. (1966). LABOR FORCE PROJECTIONS BY STATE, 1970 AND 1980. SPECIAL LABOR FORCE REPORT NUMBER 74. DATA FROM THE 1960 DECENNIAL CENSUS, MONTHLY LABOR FORCE (HOUSEHOLD) SURVEYS, AND JULY 1, 1966, POPULATION ESTIMATES FROM THE BUREAU OF THE CENSUS IN TABULAR FORM GIVE THE 1960 AND PROJECTED 1970 AND 1980 POPULATION AND LABOR FORCE (EXCLUDING ARMED FORCES OVERSEAS) FIGURES BY AGE, COLOR, AND SEX, FOR THE UNITED STATES, THE GEOGRAPHIC REGIONS, AND THE STATES. CHARTS SHOW PERCENT INCREASE IN THE PROJECTED LABOR FORCE. THE PROJECTIONS INDICATE THAT (1) THE TOTAL RESIDENT LABOR FORCE WILL INCREASE BY MORE THAN 15 MILLION PERSONS (22 PERCENT) FROM 1960 TO 1970 AND BY A SIMILAR AMOUNT (18 PERCENT) FROM 1970 TO 1980, RISING TO JUST OVER 100 MILLION IN 1980, (2) THE WEST WILL SHOW THE GREATEST INCREASE DURING BOTH DECADES WITH NEVADA, ARIZONA, UTAH, CALIFORNIA, COLORADO, AND NEW MEXICO SHOWING LABOR FORCE INCREASES OF 30 PERCENT OR MORE FROM 1960 TO 1970, (3) IN THIS DECADE, THE 25 SLOWEST GROWING STATES WILL HAVE GROWTH RATES RANGING FROM 10 TO 21 PERCENT, (4) FOR THE NATION AS A WHOLE, THE NUMBER OF YOUNG WORKERS (14 TO 24 YEARS OLD) WILL INCREASE BY ABOUT 47 PERCENT FROM 1960 TO 1970, BUT IN THE FOLLOWING DECADE THE INCREASE WILL BE ONLY ABOUT 14 PERCENT, AND (5) THE NONWHITE LABOR FORCE WILL INCREASE BY 31 AND 26 PERCENT IN THE TWO SUCCESSIVE DECADES BUT WILL GROW AT ABOUT TWICE THE RATE FOR THE WHOLE LABOR FORCE IN THE NORTHEAST AND NORTH CENTRAL REGIONS. THE LIMITATIONS AFFECTING THE RELIABILITY OF THE PROJECTIONS AND THE METHODS USED ARE DISCUSSED IN DETAIL. THIS DOCUMENT, AVAILABLE FREE FROM THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, ORIGINALLY APPEARED IN "MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW," OCTOBER 1966. Descriptors: Age, Comparative Analysis, Demography, Geographic Regions

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