Bibliography: New Mexico (page 204 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Bridget O'Connor, Regina Tosca, Judy VanSlyke Turk, Richardson EPD Consortium D, Julia Teresa Quiroz, Boulder Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Mary Buckelew, Cynthia Levinson, Thomas A. Lyson, and Robert G. Kibler.

Friedenberg, Joan E. (1987). The Condition of Vocational Education for Limited English-Proficient Persons in Selected Areas of the United States. This report examines the practices of vocational education programs that serve limited English-proficient (LEP) students without the benefit of federal bilingual vocational training funds. Visits were made to seven areas of the United States with large numbers of LEP persons: South Florida, Southern California, Connecticut, Metropolitan New York, Southeastern Michigan, Coastal Texas, and North Central New Mexico. Approximately two secondary, two adult or postsecondary, and one industry-based program were visited in each site; administrators, vocational teachers, English-as-a-second-language (ESL) teachers, counselors, job developers, and students were interviewed. The results of the research are presented in seven case studies as well as in cross-site summaries. Some of the findings are as follows: (1) improved assessment and record keeping techniques as well as consistent policies are needed to determine the degree of participation of LEP students in vocational education programs; (2) better information about vocational education needs to be disseminated to LEP students; (3) entrance testing and interviewing geared to LEP students are needed to ensure greater equity and access; (4) assessment instruments for LEP students should be more widely used; (5) there is a need for improved planning for LEP vocational students in some state departments of education, districts, and schools; (6) ESL teachers should receive more training and aides should be used; and (7) the most viable way to ensure that LEP vocational students are served effectively is to establish a nonexclusionary policy, develop a plan for implementing that policy, and provide a full-time person to execute that plan. Recommendations for improving the condition of vocational education for LEP students are made for various levels of government, educational agencies, and schools. The interview protocals used in the study are appended.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Bilingual Education Programs, English (Second Language), Limited English Speaking

Scheiber, Howard J. (1988). From Santa Fe and Back, or Bust: Developing Exit Level Writing Competencies for Third and Fifth Grades. In conjunction with the New Mexico State Department of Education's Writing Appraisal Program for high school students, a project was designed whose central goal was to identify and clearly delineate writing competencies for students in the younger grades. A pilot project first collected student writing samples and descriptive data from third and fifth grade students and their teachers in randomly selected classes in two districts (Santa Fe and Alburquerque). Following this, approximately 3,000 writing samples (narrative, descriptive, and persuasive writing) were collected from 13 school districts over a 7- to 12-week period, beginning in the fall of 1982 through mid-January 1983. In addition, descriptive data from 45 elementary language arts teachers from the same 13 school districts were compiled based on responses to curriculum mapping questionnaires, and descriptive and evaluative data were elicited from a statewide appointed 23-member Elementary Writing Competencies Task Force composed of reading, language arts, and English faculty at all levels of instruction. Two documents were developed from the compilation and summarizing of these data. "Essentials of an Effective Writing Program" presents guidelines for the writing teacher, and describes in detail seven segments of an effective writing program: setting the stage; pre-writing; drafting; rewriting and revision; editing and proofreading; evaluation; and publication. "Exit Level Writing Competencies for Third and Fifth Grades" includes behavioral objectives for various areas of writing competency–coherence and unity; sentence structure; mechanics; narrative, descriptive, and persuasive modes; and intention and delivery. (Samples of third and fifth-grade student writings, a writing curriculum mapping form, two pages of footnotes, and five references are appended.)   [More]  Descriptors: Curriculum Evaluation, Curriculum Guides, Elementary Education, English Curriculum

Macaranas, Natividad (1982). A Creative Approach to Teaching. An innovative teaching method used in a theories of personality class at Eastern New Mexico University is described. The objectives of this method were to foster growth in creativity among students by involving them in creative activities or experiential sessions and to test for improvement in student creativity scores. The following procedure was followed: a pretest using Form A, Verbal, Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT); application of the Creative Thinking and Problem-Solving Method; and a post-test using Form B, TTCT. The Creative Thinking and Problem-Solving Method consists of the following techniques: activities, creative diagrams, presentation of theories, films and one-page reactions, outlines and alternative constructs, presentations of creative productions, and developing and presenting the students' own theories of personality. Each of the nine activities consisted of descriptions or definitions of the concept used (e.g., brainstorming), instructions for performing the activity, and discussion of issues related to the concept. Students were asked to diagram their perceptions of the personality theory under study. A team of two or three students presented a theory from the textbook in as creative a manner as possible, and each gave a description of a creative product produced outside of the class. On the TTCT, it was found that a change in originality occurred for the students, but flexibility and fluency measures did not change. It is concluded that not enough exercises in rapidly producing solutions and finding divergent solution ideas for a problem were included in the creative activities. However, it is suggested that the objectives of fostering and experiencing creativity were met. Descriptors: College Instruction, Creativity, Creativity Tests, Higher Education

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Boulder, CO. (1978). A Study of Medical Graduates of the WICHE Student Exchange Programs Showing the Relation of That Group to the Medical Manpower of the Sending States. The medical graduates from the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) Student Exchange Programs (SEP) are studied in their relation to the medical manpower of the sending states. Participating schools were: University of California (Los Angeles, Irvine, and San Francisco branches); Loma Linda University; Stanford University; University of Southern California; University of Colorado Medical Center; University of Oregon Health Sciences Center; University of Utah; and University of Washington. "Sending" states in medicine during the period covered by this report were: Alaska; Arizona; Hawaii; Idaho; Montana; Nevada; New Mexico; and Wyoming. Highlighted findings are that: 33 percent of SEP graduates through 1970 were located in 1976 in the home state that had sent them as exchange students; the total number of physicians graduated with the M.D. during the SEP-era located in the sending state exceeds the number of SEP graduates sent by that state in each of the sending states; of the total SEP-era graduates from all schools located in the sending states, the SEP graduates represent 5 percent; graduates of the WICHE schools constitute 16 percent of all SEP-era graduates located in the eight states combined; out of a total of 29,948 SEP-era graduates located in the WICHE region, 383, or 1.3 percent are SEP graduates; and 91 SEP graduates were located in the United States outside the WICHE region, but 2,969 SEP-era graduates of institutions outside the region were located in the eight sending states.   [More]  Descriptors: Followup Studies, Geographic Distribution, Graduate Surveys, Labor Utilization

Lawson, Gayla Juan Hughes (1989). An Analysis of a Staff Development Intervention in Rural Schools. This study examines variables that affect staff development in rural schools. It examines systematically delivered rural staff development intervention in 28 rural schools in five states representative of the Southwest–Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Texas. The study, involving 700 teachers, tests 18 hypotheses based largely on research, experience, and literature from non-rural settings. It examines 24 variables related to staff development intervention, in order to construct a predictive model of context variables supporting the use of effective strategies for staff training. Initial site variables tested were: average daily attendance, ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), number of teachers and administrators, selection of site, proximity to the nearest institution of higher learning (IHE), and a perceptual measure of site's instructional focus. Training variables included: administrative participation, incentives offered, time of day held, release time allowed, number of participants, source of trainer, and training observation. Teacher rate of implementation was measured with the following variables: method of selection for training, gender, grade level, and type of course taught. The study concludes that a number of variables have an effect on the rate that teachers implement new or improved strategies and behaviors following training. Eight predictors were found to account for 56.9% of dependent variable, including: (1) training time of day; (2) number of students at school eligible for free or reduced lunch (SES); (3) administrative participation; (4) nearness to an IHE; (5) incentive provided; (6) high school-level teaching assignment; (7) number of administrators in district; and (8) trainer from an IHE. The study recommends areas of further research. Approximately 100 references are included. Descriptors: Administrator Role, Educational Research, Instructional Effectiveness, Models

SAMORA, JULIAN; AND OTHERS (1962). THE SPANISH SPEAKING PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES. A PILOT STUDY TRACED THE HISTORY AND BACKGROUND OF SPANISH SPEAKING PEOPLE IN THE UNITED STATES AND DISCUSSED THEIR PRESENT POSITION IN AMERICAN SOCIETY IN TERMS OF EDUCATION, HOUSING, EMPLOYMENT, ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE, VOTING, PUBLIC ACCOMMODATIONS, AND HEALTH. DISCRIMINATION AND THE DEPRIVATION OF CIVIL RIGHTS WERE EMPHASIZED. SOURCES FOR STUDY WERE BOOKS, ARTICLES, U.S. CENSUS REPORTS, CENSUS TRACT DATA, QUESTIONNAIRES, AND INTERVIEWS. ACCORDING TO THE 1960 CENSUS, 4,320,724 SPANISH SPEAKING PEOPLE LIVED IN THE UNITED STATES. OF THE TOTAL, 3,465,000 LIVED IN ARIZONA, CALIFORNIA, COLORADO, NEW MEXICO, AND TEXAS. IN THE 1950'S THEIR HISTORY WAS DIFFERENT FROM OTHER IMMIGRANT GROUPS, BECAUSE SPANISH AMERICANS AND PUERTO RICANS WERE CONQUERED PEOPLE UPON WHOM THE CULTURE OF THE CONQUERORS WAS SUPERIMPOSED. THEIR TRADITION OF PASSIVE SUBSERVIENCE TO AUTHORITY WAS THE BASIC DIFFICULTY IN THEIR ASSIMILATION TO AMERICAN SOCIETY. FACTORS COMPLICATING THE ASSIMILATION PROCESS WERE LANGUAGE DIFFICULTIES, SKIN COLOR, HEALTH DIFFERENCES, AND LOW SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS. THEIR EDUCATION, HOUSING, EMPLOYMENT, HEALTH, INCOME, AND OCCUPATION CONDITIONS WERE POORER THAN OTHER NONWHITES AND MUCH POORER THAN THE WHITES. BASED ON THE FINDINGS IN THE STUDY, RECOMMENDATIONS WERE MADE FOR THE FOLLOWING–(1) A NATIONAL AGENCY TO HELP SPANISH SPEAKING PEOPLE SOLVE THEIR PROBLEMS, (2) MORE FIELD WORKERS FOR SPANISH SPEAKING LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS, (3) NONCOMPETITIVE SCHOLARSHIPS AT THE JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL LEVELS, (4) AN ATTACK ON THE MINORITY PROBLEM THROUGH PROGRAMS COMBATTING PREJUDICE, DISCRIMINATION, AND EXPLOITATION, (5) MORE DETAILED RESEARCH STUDIES COVERING A LARGER NUMBER OF SPANISH SPEAKING PEOPLE IN EVERY ASPECT OF THEIR LIVES, AND (6) A CENTER FOR RESEARCH TO COORDINATE KNOWLEDGE AND PROGRAMS ON MINORITY GROUPS. Descriptors: Cultural Differences, Disadvantaged, Economically Disadvantaged, Mexican Americans

Turk, Judy VanSlyke; And Others (1988). Hispanic Americans in the News: A Minority Group Comes of Age in Two Southwestern Cities. Investigating complaints that newspaper reports about Hispanic Americans or Hispanic issues are biased, a study examined the daily newspaper coverage of Hispanics and Hispanic issues by the "Albuquerque Journal" (New Mexico) and the "San Antonio Express" (Texas). Three constructed-year samples, for 1982, 1984, and 1986, were selected for analysis, and 27 issues of each newspaper were examined. All wire stories were excluded, as were sports stories, stories in the entertainment or women's sections, and advertisements. Findings revealed that Hispanics and Hispanic issues are, at least in two Southwestern cities, present in the newspaper in proportion to their presence in the population. Albuquerque's population is approximately 33% Hispanic, and the "Journal" devoted 49.6% of its news space to Hispanic coverage. San Antonio's population is approximately 41% Hispanic, and 43.8% of the local stories and photos that appeared in the "Express" were Hispanic. Hispanic stories and photos in the "Journal" and "Express" are generally longer, get bigger headlines and more prominent placement in the newspaper, and focus less on "bad news" than coverage of interest to Anglos. However, findings revealed that Hispanic news coverage tends to focus on Hispanics as "problem people." One-quarter of the Hispanic stories dealt with judicial, crime, or accident/disaster problems, compared to only 16.7% of the non-Hispanic (Anglo) coverage. In addition, 21.5% of Hispanic stories, compared with 12.8% of Anglo stories, were news reports of judicial or criminal activities. (Twenty-five footnotes, ten tables of data, and two charts are appended.) Descriptors: Cultural Context, Ethnic Bias, Hispanic Americans, Mass Media Effects

Lyson, Thomas A. (1990). Down and Out in Rural America: The Status of Blacks and Hispanics in the 1980s. Blacks and Hispanics in rural America face opportunities and life circumstances distinctively different from their urban counterparts. Not only are rural conditions generally worse than urban areas in job opportunity, social services, and human capital, but the problem of inequity is also more severe within rural areas than within urban areas. Most rural Blacks live in the South, with over half of these in the South Atlantic states. Most rural Hispanics are Mexican-American and live in Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Texas. The Index of Dissimilarity, used to measure the degree of segregation in occupational distributions, indicates that the greatest occupational discrepancy is between rural Whites and rural Blacks. Wider cross-racial discrepancy in educational attainment also exists in rural areas. Although more rural minorities succeeded in completing elementary school and high school by the end of the 1980s, they did not experience similar improvements in postsecondary attendance and college completion. In rural areas, there are fewer Whites than Blacks or Hispanics with less than eight years of schooling and many more Whites than Blacks or Hispanics with college degrees. As a result, the gap between Whites and other groups persists in rural areas. The problem is most acute in poor regions of the nation, where local funds for schooling are more limited. The improvement of human capital in rural areas is crucial in dealing with global economic competition. Education must focus on traits and characteristics compatible with work in small scale, diverse and flexibly specialized businesses and enterprises. Examples of such firms would be those offering specialty food products, custom-tailored clothing, handcrafted furniture, professional business services, computer software design, and specialty apparel. Such entrepreneurial enterprises would benefit all rural workers, and they need to be supported by state and local governments through development of infrastructure and policy initiatives. This report includes 7 data tables and 14 references. Descriptors: Blacks, Educational Attainment, Geographic Distribution, Hispanic Americans

Buckelew, Mary (1991). Group Discussion Strategies for a Diverse Student Population. In a diverse population such as the one at the University of New Mexico, a population made up of a variety of ethnic groups including Hispanic, Navajo, Japanese, and Anglo students, instructors need to give a voice to every student, to point out differences, similarities, universal and not-so-universal ideas, all of which enrich everyone's store of knowledge. Students in a very reticent English 101 class discussed nonfiction essays prior to writing essays of their own. Class discussion was carried out by only 3 or 4 students out of a class of 20. In an effort to remedy this, an informal questionnaire was completed by the students regarding what would help them to join in class discussions. Following this, on the basis of the students' responses, Benjamin Bloom's (1956) taxonomy of educational objectives, and various writings on collaborative learning, the instructor provided the students with a series of questions for the essays to be discussed. Students answered the questions before coming to class and then participated in small group discussion based on the questions. The questions were written so that there was one from each of the domains of Bloom's taxonomy. Since there were four different question sheets for each essay and four students per small discussion group, each student in a group had a different sheet of questions and thus a sense of authority. While some students still did not participate in class, many students improved the content of their essays and more students participated in large group discussions. In another diverse, yet vociferous English 101 class, students initiated and directed classroom discussion. Groups of three students presented an essay from the textbook to the class. These student presentations were an outstanding success. Using these strategies, even the quiet students participated in class discussions.   [More]  Descriptors: Classroom Communication, College English, Cultural Differences, Discussion (Teaching Technique)

Quiroz, Julia Teresa; Tosca, Regina (1990). On My Own: Mexican American Women, Self-Sufficiency, and the Family Support Act. The Focus Study, conducted by the National Council of La Raza's Poverty Project, used structured discussions by focus groups to examine Mexican American women's opinions, needs, and attitudes as they relate to the implementation of the 1988 Family Support Act (FSA). FSA's primary objective is to move people off welfare through education, training, and employment. The purpose of the first-year focus groups was to identify subject areas to be explored in the second year. The project staff conducted eight focus groups in four communities: Phoenix, Arizona; Mora, New Mexico; Pharr, Texas; and Kansas City, Missouri. In each community, the Focus Study collaborated with a staff person from a Hispanic community-based organization. Focus group participants were 57 Mexican American mothers under the age of 21. The following findings challenge some common perceptions about young Mexican American women: (1) they believed they could improve their economic status and were actively working to do so; (2) they showed a high level of initiative and resistance to dependence on welfare, whether they used welfare or not; (3) they saw lack of jobs, lack of access to good jobs, lack of high quality child care, and lack of transportation as barriers to economic security; (4) they expressed serious concerns about the quality and safety of center-based child care, and a preference for child care provided by relatives; and (5) they showed resistance to traditional cponcepts of marriage. Community profiles, a participant profile, an overview of the Family Support Act, a first-year discussion guide, and a first-year background questionnaire are appended. Descriptors: Community Coordination, Community Programs, Day Care, Discussion Groups

O'Connor, Bridget; Levinson, Cynthia, Ed. (1984). Regional Forum on Distance Learning. A Report. The audio teleconference summarized in this report joined six state education agencies (Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas) and the National Institute of Education with experts nationally and abroad for 3 days in April 1984. Presentations summarized include (1) "The Need to Consider Alternative Delivery," Paul Resta and William Kirby; (2) "Learning by Distance: How Effective?" Joseph Lipson; (3) "College Credit for the Gifted by Teleconference," Jan Kruh; (4) "Science Teacher Inservice by Teleconference," Jack Gerlovich and Roy Unruh; (5) "Coursework for Certification of Vocational Education Teachers," Arnold Freitag and Howard Hammond; (6) "Elementary Math and Foreign Languages by Gemini Blackboard," Frederic Todd, Sr., Betty Scott, and Everett Gillette; (7) "Mathematics and Language Drill by Dial Access," Elliot Duchon and Ron Fortune; (8) "Computer Networking for the Classroom," Paul Nachtigal and Richard Phillips; (9) "Computer Chronicles," Margaret Riel; (10) "Improving Reading with Teletype," Clarice Kenney; (11) "How to Use the Gemini Blackboard," Linda Yetter; (12) "Cost Efficiency of Distance Technologies," Leslie Wagner and Rickiann Bronstein; and (13) "Electronic Networks," Carl Oldsen. Summaries are also provided for three sessions on educational policy issues: an interactive problem-solving session, state education agency reports, and a nationwide distance learning survey. Statements by Terrel Bell and Manuel Justiz on the future, a distance learning experience report, and resource information are included.    [More]  Descriptors: Computer Oriented Programs, Distance Education, Information Networks, Instructional Innovation

Kibler, Robert G.; And Others (1981). Education and Related Services for Young Children with Special Needs in Rural America. The three papers examine rural early education and related services for young children with handicaps. The first paper is entitled "A University Based Inservice Training Model for Personnel Serving Handicapped Preschoolers" by S. Stile and T. Pettibone and reports evaluation results of a New Mexico project serving 14 teachers with a 5 week summer training program. Results indicated that six of the eight objectives had been reached or surpassed. Seven steps of program development from establishment of traineeships through development of coursework and evaluation are also identified. Among appendixes are a competency list and an excerpt from the course syllabus. The second paper, by J. Tucker and M. Riley, is titled "Delivering Services to Handicapped Children in Rural Areas–Issues and Answers." The paper describes a rural home based program, Project Family Link, which stresses home based teaching, family involvement, and service linkage. Also considered are "rural realities" in the following areas: reaching families, type of program, staff, parental involvement, support services, and funding. The third paper, "Rural Early Intervention Services–Issues in Implementation and Evaluation" by B. Mallory, reports on a field study of two rural center based programs for young handicapped children. The author proposes hypotheses about service delivery and resource allocation concerned with social distribution of program information necessary for decision making; locus of control and community integration; local response to externally generated policies; identification of eligible population; service delivery systems; local resource allocation; and integration with social service networks. He concludes that centrally controlled implementation is not successful in assuring the replication of a specific program model aimed at a narrowly defined population living in a rural community. Descriptors: Delivery Systems, Disabilities, Early Childhood Education, Inservice Teacher Education

Thomas, Timothy R. (1991). Integrated Humanities: A Participatory Course for a Multi-Cultural Environment. A course description and syllabus are provided for "Integrated Humanities," a general education course taught at Northern New Mexico Community College to provide students with a solid, reliable knowledge base and framework upon which to build future educational experiences. Following introductory material, a syllabus for students is presented, reviewing course strategies and goals, the instructor's expectations, and grading policy. The syllabus provides descriptions of 30 week-long units structured around an academic lecture and a related activity designed to illustrate the relationship between the lectures and actual life experiences (e.g., recording the moon's phases, making an obsidian blade, visiting a subculture, deducing the grammatical structure of an artificial language, and designing a fallout shelter). The units are: (1) Matter, Time, and Scale; (2) Molecules, Emergent Properties, and Life; (3) Ecology without Man; (4) The Enormous Gap (between apes and humans); (5) Ice Age Man; (6) The Domestication of Plants; (7) The Fundamentals of Civilization; (8) Greeks and the Power of Philosophy; (9) The Glory of Greece; (10) Jews, Romans, and Christians; (11) The Dark of Europe and the Light of Islam; (12) Medieval Europe; (13) The European Discovery of Greece; (14) Eras in Conflict–Cortez vs. Montezuma; (15) Reason, Romanticism, Revolution; (16) The Industrial Revolution; (17) War and Technology; (18) Medicine and Population; (19) Epistemology; (20) Society and Its Power; (21) Alienation and Culture; (22) Madness, Mysticism, and Magic; (23) Math and the Description of Reality; (24) Language, Communication, and Social Reality; (25) Literature as Mirror; (26) Form and Design; (27) Visual Art and Self-Expression; (28) To Dance and Sing; (29) All the World's a Stage; and (30) The Future. Each unit description includes 10 new terms for students, and suggestions and explanations for the instructor. Descriptors: Activity Units, American Indians, Class Activities, Community Colleges

Seidenwurm, Jerry; Fitzpatrick, Peter (1987). Art Program Evaluation. This art study was conducted in the spring of 1986, during the evaluation segment of Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public Schools' (APS) 6-year curriculum planning cycle. Archival data were collected; large numbers of students, parents, teachers, and administrators were surveyed; secondary level classrooms were visited; and a review of the literature was conducted. The evaluation covered program philosophy and goals, service delivery, content, methods, materials, facilities, support, and effectiveness. Fourteen different surveys were administered in the spring of 1986 to a total of 1,499 students, 1,028 parents, 92 teachers, 4 itinerant teacher, and 89 principals from elementary, middle, and high schools in the APS. Results indicate that: (1) the amount of art education in the APS has declined at all levels in recent years; (2) offerings are not entirely standardized and provision of resources is not consistent across schools; (3) teachers expressed a desire to meet with other teachers more frequently to improve aspects of the art instruction process; (4) only 10% of secondary principals and teachers found the APS's use of community resources within its art program to be suitable; (5) most students find art programming highly enjoyable; (6) art instruction appears to be very successful in teaching students to pursue projects through their completion; and (7) the issue of written testing to assess art education achievement is a matter of dispute throughout the nation. Respondents indicated that the most crucial level of concern is the elementary art program, in which many students do not receive consistent, well-planned art instruction. Descriptors: Achievement Tests, Administrator Attitudes, Art Education, Curriculum Evaluation

EPD Consortium D, Richardson, TX. (1975). Region VI Inservice Training for Vocational-Technical Personnel (Arlington, Texas, October 7-10, 1975). Conference Report. This conference report contains a collection of thirteen papers delivered at the Region VI (New Mexico, Texas, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Oklahoma) inservice training conference, which focused on special needs groups (i.e., those with academic, socioeconomic, or physical handicaps that prevent them from succeeding in regular vocational programs). Titles and authors of the papers follow: "National Effort for Meeting Needs of Special Populations in Correctional Institutions and Indian Education as Related to Vocational Education" by Victor Van Hook; "National Effort for Meeting Needs of Special Populations–Adult Education" by John W. Thiele; "National Effort for Meeting the Needs of Special Populations–Women, Bilingual" by Wilma Ludwig; "State Advisory Council" by Alton D. Ice;"State Effort for Meeting the Needs of Special Populations in Vocational-Technical Education" by Cadar Parr; "VESA-CETA Package" by James Dasher; "The Trend of National Efforts in Training the Disadvantaged" by Francis Tuttle; "Vocational Programs for the Handicapped/Health Occupations for the Handicapped" by Spencer Guimarin; "Vocational Adult Education: Commit or Forget" by John W. Talbott; "Vocational Education for the Disadvantaged: Compliance or Commitment?" by Katy Greenwood; "Designing Preservice and Inservice Teacher Education Programs in Vocational-Technical Education to Meet the Needs of Handicapped Students" by LaNiece Robison; "Institutional Vocational-Technical Skull Sessions" by Domingo Arechiga; and "Design Preservice and Inservice Teacher Education Programs in Vocational-Technical Education to Meet Needs of the Disadvantaged" by Raymond F. Faucette. Descriptors: Adult Education, Advisory Committees, Allied Health Occupations Education, American Indians

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Leave a Reply