Bibliography: New Mexico (page 203 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Brian P. Cooke, Las Cruces. Dona Ana Branch Community Coll. New Mexico State Univ., Doris Kay Parker Walker, Jeanne H. Nathanson, HARRY BORNSTEIN, Hartford. Connecticut Public Television, Washington General Accounting Office, Washington National Coalition for the Homeless, John L. Price, and Wesley Hoover.

Connecticut Public Television, Hartford. (1997). Scientific American Frontiers Teaching Guides for Shows 801-805, October 1997-April 1998. These teaching guides are meant to supplement the eighth season (1997-98) of the PBS Series "Scientific American Frontiers". Episode 801 is entitled "Expedition Panama: Science at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute" and the teaching guide contains information and activities on the ultrasonic communication of bats, communication among Panama's stingless bees, problems with the watershed of the Panama Canal, the role of leafcutter ants in the rainforest, and the impact Panama has had on the earth's climate and animals. The teaching guide for Episode 802, entitled "Beyond Science? Investigations into Pseudoscience," includes information and activities on dowsing to detect underground water, handwriting analysis, the debate over aliens landing at Roswell, New Mexico, perpetual motion and zero-point energy, and therapeutic touch. Episode 803 is entitled "Nordic Sagas: Science in Scandinavia" and features information and activities on Viking ships, the birth of an island from a volcano (Surtsey), the contamination of Lapland reindeer resulting from the Chernobyl disaster, studying genetics through Iceland's unique population, and the use of technology to enhance the lives of people with disabilities. Episode 804 is entitled "The Art of Science: Enhancing Creativity through Science and Technology" and contains information and activities on a 20th-century version of Ben Franklin's glass harmonica, the creation of a digital character for a speaking part, restoration of the Shaw Memorial, a robot programmed to conceive and create paintings, and an interactive opera performed by hyperinstruments. Episode 805 is entitled "The New Zoos: Enriching the Minds and Lives of Animals" and presents information and activities on polar bear enrichment at the San Diego Zoo, the study of orangutan psychology at Toronto's Metro Zoo, the medical center at the New England Aquarium, high-tech tracking of giant bluefin tuna, captive breeding programs, and a jungle boot camp for golden lion tamarins.   [More]  Descriptors: Animal Caretakers, Aquariums, Art, Creativity

General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Health, Education, and Human Services Div. (1995). Welfare to Work: Approaches That Help Teenage Mothers Complete High School. Report to Congressional Requesters. This document presents findings of a General Accounting Office (GAO) study that identified approaches and Aid to Dependent Children (AFDC) program activities that help teenage mothers complete their secondary education. Data were obtained from visits to 13 local programs in New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas, Vermont, and Wisconsin and interviews with AFDC and JOBS program administrators in 15 cities. In addition, published impact evaluations of five other programs were synthesized. The synthesis of program evaluations suggests that close monitoring of teenage mothers' educational activities with followup, when their attendance drops, is effective in increasing the likelihood that they complete their education. Three of the 15 cities reported that they monitored the school attendance of teenage mothers. Leveraging the welfare benefit as a sanction or reward for attendance has contributed to high school completion. Providing supportive services to overcome barriers to continued attendance, with or without financial incentives, also seems to be effective, especially for dropouts. Finally, assistance in meeting their child care and transportation needs may be particularly helpful but did not appear to be sufficient, without attendance monitoring. The 13 programs provided examples of innovative approaches that differed from the programs included in the evaluation synthesis: alternative schools for pregnant and parenting students, residential facilities for homeless teenage mothers on AFDC, home visiting, and school-based programs for at-risk students. Two figures and one table are included. Appendices contain information on the evaluation-synthesis methodology, program descriptions, comments from the Department of Health and Human Services, and lists of GAO contacts, staff acknowledgements, and related GAO products. The report does not distinguish between voluntary and mandatory programs. (Contains 30 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Persistence, Attendance Patterns, Birth Rate, Births to Single Women

Hoover, Wesley; And Others (1989). Staff Development in Rural, Small Schools: A View from Rural Educators in the Southwest. Little information exists to provide an accurate portrait of education in small rural schools, including staff development practices and needs in such schools. The Southwest Educational Development Laboratory conducted a review of literature and a survey of rural educators in the Southwest concerning staff development in their schools. The survey represented an initial effort to describe the staff development activities that existed in rural small schools and the staff development activities that educators working at these schools actually preferred. A sample was drawn from Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, for survey purposes, and structured interviews were conducted with 20 teachers. Results of the survey indicated that 80% of the respondents regularly participate in multiple staff development activities during the school year. The most frequent activities consist of one-shot lectures given by consultants from outside the district with little follow-up provided for the participants. The data also suggest that staff development activities are not typically planned and initiated at the local level, but from the top down, perhaps reflecting the fact that staff development is not based on local needs. While the data suggest strong tendencies towards episodic staff development, there are also signs of an emerging locally driven system as well. Topics covered were wide-ranging, from the basic to the controversial. The topics considered most relevant were those that offer immediately useful materials, or specific, directly applicable skills.  Survey information is presented in 12 data tables. This document contains 31 references and a copy of the Staff Development Questionnaire.   [More]  Descriptors: Continuing Education, Elementary School Teachers, Elementary Secondary Education, Faculty Development

Hutto, Nora; And Others (1990). Using Partnerships To Strengthen Elementary Science Education: A Guide for Rural Administrators. This guide was written to help rural elementary schools implement science teaching strategies for motivating students and to identify outside resources for strengthening science instruction. The guidebook emphasizes the need for active administrative leadership and strong teacher involvement in planning and implementing partnership activities. The book is divided into nine chapters and provides both general information and specific examples relating to instructional approaches, recruiting and working with partners, and ways of assessing and supporting partnership programs. Chapter 1 discusses the need for science partnerships and encourages planning that puts partnership activities within a larger context of goals for general science-instruction improvement. Chapter 2 discusses elements of effective science instruction, teacher training, and the use of "hands-on" science education. The chapter also encourages educators to use local resources and to integrate science content into other curriculum areas. Examples of potential partnerships are offered. Chapter 3 is a guide for involving teachers in improvement efforts. Various steps of the planning process are detailed. Chapter 4 offers strategies for establishing science partnerships, including tips for identifying and contacting potential partners, clarifying partnership goals, and establishing good working relationships. Chapter 5 describes partnership concerns, including liability and safety issues, scientific ethics, and disabled students' needs. Chapter 6 describes ways of involving parents. Chapter 7 deals with program assessment and evaluation. Chapter 8 is a guide to fundraising. Chapter 9 offers more general suggestions for those embarking on partnership efforts. The document includes a bibliography of 54 references and a brief history and description of the New Mexico Rural Science Education Project.   [More]  Descriptors: Cooperative Programs, Educational Cooperation, Elementary Education, Elementary School Science

Linton, Thomas H. (1972). A Study of the Relationship of Global Self-Concept, Academic Self-Concept, and Academic Achievement Among Anglo and Mexican-American Sixth Grade Students. The study was conducted to determine (1) if Anglo and Mexican American 6th-grade students differed significantly on measures of global and academic self-concepts and (2) the relationship of academic achievement to these self-concepts. A sample of 172 Anglo and 160 Mexican American students from 16 elementary schools in a southern New Mexico city was stratified by 3 socioeconomic levels. The Piers-Harris Children's Self Concept Scale and a 5-item factor-analyzed scale developed from existing research were used to measure self-concept. Student achievement was measured by teacher-assigned grades in reading, arithmetic, and social studies and by the Iowa Test of Basic Skills. A 3-way analysis of variance model (with students classified according to ethnicity, sex, and socioeconomic level) was used to test differences between students. Results indicated no significant differences between ethnic groups in terms of academic and global self-concepts, and no sex differences were found. Significant differences were found in both self-concept measures between socioeconomic levels. High socioeconomic level was associated with high self-concept and low socioeconomic level was associated with low self-concept. However, middle-socioeconomic-level Mexican American students' academic self-concept scores were almost the same as those of low-socioeconomic-level Anglo and Mexican American students. Results of actual achievement were consistent with findings of previous studies, and correlation analysis of the relationships between self-concept and achievement did not yield a consistent pattern across socioeconomic levels. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Anglo Americans, Comparative Analysis, Cross Cultural Studies

Walker, Doris Kay Parker (1988). Strategies for Increasing Retention of Hispanic Students in Community Colleges. A study was conducted to determine the strategies used by 145 community colleges in Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas to meet the educational needs of Hispanic students and to investigate the relationship between these strategies and Hispanic student retention rate. Questionnaires were sent to the presidents of Southwestern community colleges with a 5% or greater Hispanic enrollment, requesting information on retention rates and strategies in effect. Study findings, based on responses from 88 colleges, included the following: (1) 50% of the colleges actively recruited Hispanic students; (2) 37.5% offered financial aid; (3) 92% provided academic advising about transferability of courses, 70.5% career counseling into selective programs, 88.6% academic support services, and 21.5% special orientation; (4) 38.6% offered bilingual courses, 55.6% English as a Second Language (ESL) courses, 50% Hispanic studies courses, and 100% developmental courses; (5) 89.8% had mandatory assessment, and 64.8% had mandatory placement; (6) 31.6% provided staff development to increase sensitivity to the problems of Hispanic students; and (7) 2.6% had a proportional ethnic composition of faculty and staff. An analysis of retention rates showed that retention was improved by proportional financial aid, career counseling into selective programs, bilingual education, ESL classes, and Hispanic studies classes. The study report includes an extensive literature review on population trends, the Hispanic socioeconomic cycle, Hispanic participation in higher education, and recruitment and retention programs and strategies. The study instrument and a list of 111 references are appended. Descriptors: Academic Advising, Affirmative Action, Community Colleges, English (Second Language)

Osborne, Bill; Price, John L. (1997). An Examination of Organizational Culture in Public Schools. This paper asserts that organizations have cultures that can be described and that this descriptive data may be used prescriptively. Basic cultural components include customs, collegial relationships, competency, and confidence. This study investigated whether or not school level has any relationship to cultural norms (for example, whether elementary schools have cultural norms different from junior high schools cultural norms). The intent was to provide disaggregated data by school level to reflect descriptive differences and similarities in the culture of schools as noted by levels. The study sample consisted of self-selected schools that desired to use the Cultural Analysis Questionnaire (CAQ) to describe their existing school culture for purposes of school improvement. Data were collected from three states (Oklahoma, South Dakota, and New Mexico) and represented 33 elementary schools, 10 junior high/middle schools, and 14 high schools. The study encounters distinct differences among the four clusters and respective norms for the three levels of schools examined. Results of t-tests performed on the data indicated that each of the organizations vary significantly from the one another. Data collected support contentions voiced throughout the years by educators who have indicated that high school teachers tend to be more isolated from their peers and may not share experiences with their colleagues. School administrators must be aware of areas of agreement and disagreement among staff members, and they must have data to help the organization accomplish the journey desired. Contains a table of cultural norms for schools, results of t-test analysis, and 15 references.   [More]  Descriptors: Cultural Differences, Educational Research, Elementary Secondary Education, Instructional Improvement

Ortego, Sheila; Richards, Beverly (1995). Contract Training and Computer-Assisted Instruction at Santa Fe Community College. In summer 1993, Santa Fe Community College, New Mexico, created the External Programs Division (EPD) under its credit instruction program to serve the needs of non-traditional students. The EPD encompasses contract training, the Flex Lab, distance education, the AutoDesk Training Center, an Alternative Fuels program, and the corrections training program for prison inmates. The Flex Lab offers 29 courses in various disciplines, focusing primarily on computer operations. Students have the option to enroll late into the semester, work at their own pace, and work at the assignments at times and on days convenient for them. In January 1994, the Flex Lab had 99 students at the beginning of the semester, and had doubled its enrollment by the time classes closed on March 31. In spring 1995, 453 students enrolled. The contract training program has a heavy audience from state government and local business. Merging contract training with the Flex Lab provides an effective, affordable solution to business training needs. Advantages to merging these two programs include the following: (1) flexible scheduling eliminates the need for many employees to be out of the office at one time; (2) the self-paced, mastery learning courses accommodate students who can master course objectives very quickly and others who may progress more slowly, returning all students to the workplace with the needed skills; and (3) lack of competition and the ability for students to move at their own pace creates a better learning situation. The college is discussing a format whereby companies could pay a flat fee and then enroll a certain number of students over time, allowing employees to pursue different topics of interest at the reduced rates of the contract courses. A list of current Flex Lab courses is appended.   [More]  Descriptors: Community Colleges, Computer Science, Contract Training, Individualized Instruction

Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed. (1992). Empowerment, OSERS News in Print. This serial issue features articles on the theme of empowering people with disabilities. First, there is a message from the Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services' Assistant Secretary, Robert R. Davila. Next, "Empowerment: Dependence versus Independence," by Frank G. Bowe, stresses the need for people with disabilities to incorporate empowerment and choices into their thinking. "The Road to Personal Freedom," by Carole Royal, describes a model self-determination program of the Protection and Advocacy System of New Mexico. "We Can! Empowerment of People Who Are Deaf," by Patti Singleton, examines principles of empowerment arising from the 1988 protest at Gallaudet University (District of Columbia). "Empowerment through Sports," by Doug Single, describes various integrated programs developed by Special Olympics. "Project EMPOWER: Self Determination for Young Adults with Disabilities," by Jack Campbell, describes a program that uses experiential education activities and role modeling by adults with disabilities to help youths make the transition to adult life. "Empowerment through Peer Counseling," by Dale S. Brown, offers techniques in peer counseling and examples of its use with young people with learning disabilities. "Improving the Quality of Community Living To Empower People with Mental Retardation," by Charles Lakin, describes activity areas of the Research and Training Center for Residential Services and Community Living at the University of Minnesota. A special feature article is "Empowering Teachers To Help Students with Language Disorders in the Mainstream" (Judith M. Zorfass and Blanche Korngold). This article reports on a study which used a constructivist inservice approach to produce changed teaching practices in 10 teachers of grades 1-3, thereby facilitating language learning in children with language disorders.   [More]  Descriptors: Athletics, Change Strategies, Classroom Environment, Community Programs

National Coalition for the Homeless, Washington, DC. (1987). Pushed Out: America's Homeless. Thanksgiving 1987. By winter 1987, up to three million men, women, and children will be homeless; the number of homeless persons will continue to increase at a rate of 25 percent. This report surveys the changes in the homeless population in the following 23 cities over the past year: Albuquerque (New Mexico), Atlanta (Georgia), Boston (Massachusetts), Chicago (Illinois), Cleveland (Ohio), Dallas (Texas), Denver (Colorado), Des Moines (Iowa), Laramie (Wyoming), Los Angeles (California), Manchester (New Hampshire), Miami (Florida), Milwaukee (Wisconsin), Minneapolis (Minnesota), Nashville (Tennessee), New Haven (Connecticut), New Orleans (Louisiana), New York (New York), Phoenix (Arizona), Portland (Oregon), Richmond (Virginia), Seattle (Washington), and Washington, D.C. For each city information is given on the extent of need, resources available, causes of homelessness, housing situation, and Federal role. Data were culled from interviews with scores of service providers and local government officials. Among the findings are the following: (1) the number of homeless persons increased by an average of 25 percent over the past year; (2) the fastest-growing group among the homeless is families with children; (3) over 40 percent of the homeless population now consists of members of families; (4) increasing numbers of homeless persons are working but unable to find housing that they can afford; and (5) the single most important cause of homelessness is the extreme shortage of affordable housing. Drastic cuts in Federal funding for housing programs for the poor have led to the rise in homelessness. The Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act was an important first step, but Congress must do more to effect a long-term solution to homelessness. The creation of 350,000 new units of Federally-subsidized housing is recommended. An overview of Federal housing policies is appended. A chart illustrates the data.   [More]  Descriptors: Demography, Economically Disadvantaged, Family Characteristics, Family Problems

Armstrong, Judy (1991). Assessing Skills from Placement to Completion. A system to provide objective measures of institutional effectiveness was implemented at the Roswell branch of Eastern New Mexico University to determine whether the college was accountable to students, staff, and taxpayers; to improve the curriculum and programs; and to prepare for accreditation review in 1991. A task force spent the summer of 1988 researching and reviewing various forms of outcomes assessment. The program now consists of the following: entering students take placement tests in reading, English, and mathematics using the "Asset"; students in "College Success," a required course for entering students are given the Critical Thinking test; and after the completion of 45 units, the tests are retaken to obtain a post-test score. In addition, the school began tracking developmental studies students through their college coursework. Results of the testing efforts included the following: (1) in 1989-90, 46% of the entering students passed the math placement test, 49% passed the English placement test, and 59% passed the reading placement test; (2) in 1990-91, when Roswell switched to the "Asset" placement test, only 34% passed the math section, 32% passed the English test, and 35% passed the reading test; and (3) in 1989-90, 96% of the students enrolled in developmental math classes passed, 82% passed developmental English classes, and 83% passed developmental reading, while in 1990-91, pass rates were 88% for math, 73% for English, and 84% for reading. One of the advantages of the Roswell's testing program is that it facilitates comparisons with similar institutions and national norms.   [More]  Descriptors: Achievement Tests, College Outcomes Assessment, Graphs, Higher Education

Black, Marjorie (1991). Community College Partnership. Community colleges must assume a proactive leadership role to develop strategies that establish and maintain partnerships with business and other community organizations. San Juan College (SJC) has forged partnerships with a variety of local organizations, including governmental, civic, business, educational, medical, and cultural groups. Government and civic partnerships have been established with both the Chamber of Commerce and the Navajo Tribal Government. In addition, the college has hosted CoMex 2000, a regional conference of civic and government leaders from Colorado and New Mexico. To establish links with the business community, SJC operates its own small business development center and has joined four local organizations in creating the San Juan Economic Development Service to assist the county in attracting business and industry to the area. SJC's participation in educational alliances includes the establishment of 2 + 2 articulated programs with area vocational and local high schools; the Conference on Aging in collaboration with senior citizen groups; the Women's Conference; and many special activities for particular public school students. The college's Early Childhood Center not only offers special educational opportunities for children but also serves as a laboratory school for teachers. Recently, SJC was selected as a Beacon College in an intercollegiate alliance of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges. In order to improve local health care services and education, SJC has fostered a close partnership with the Regional Medical Center and other local health care providers. The college also participates in the Fine Arts Committee, a partnership linking local artists, musicians, and patrons of the arts. Recreational partnerships include a collaboration with the city to develop an 18-hole golf course. Finally, SJC has acted as the catalyst in the development of a county-wide leadership training program. Through these diverse partnerships, SJC has been able to respond to community needs and gain broad community support.   [More]  Descriptors: College Role, Community Colleges, Cooperative Programs, Cultural Enrichment

Cooke, Brian P. (1994). Rethinking Teaching and Testing: Quality in the Classroom. Changes in the way contemporary organizations conduct business demand a concurrent redesign of teaching and testing methods. Maintaining instructional quality must begin with knowledge of the quality revolution in contemporary organizations in order to meet the demands of these organizations for self-confident, self-directed, self-motivated, team-oriented, quality-sensitive, and customer-directed employees. Teachers must assure the complementary development of student interest, appreciation, pride of workmanship, and skills in learning, constant improvement, leadership, and collaboration. In a quality classroom, the teacher and students share responsibility for learning course content and for developing thinking, judgment, and interpersonal communication. Quality teachers envision and manage their classrooms as exemplary organizations, and minimize student fear and competitiveness. At Santa Fe Community College, in New Mexico, instructors have been teaching and testing students with an emphasis on principles of collaboration and continuous quality improvement (CQI). The CQI approach to objective testing begins with a class discussion of the demand for collaborative work in contemporary organizations, explains the linkages between collaborative learning and future employment opportunities, and evaluates students both on their individual and collaborative knowledge. After tests are taken by both individuals and teams, the instructor notes the most frequently misunderstood questions to identify the "significant few" learning points that need continued instruction. Data collected in a recent Business and Management course indicate that this quality testing approach delivers measurable improvement in student learning as defined by continuous improvement on unit tests. Student responses further substantiate the merit of quality teaching and learning processes.   [More]  Descriptors: Classroom Environment, Community Colleges, Cooperative Learning, Education Work Relationship

BORNSTEIN, HARRY (1965). READING THE MANUAL ALPHABET–A RESEARCH PROGRAM FOR DEVELOPING A FILMED PROGRAM FOR TEACHING THE MANUAL ALPHABET. A PROGRAMED FILM COURSE WAS DEVELOPED TO TEACH PERSONS HOW TO READ THE MANUAL ALPHABET. THE EFFECTS OF THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMING CONDITIONS WERE STUDIED–MANNER OF STIMULUS REPETITION, RATE OF STIMULUS PRESENTATION, AND MODE OF RESPONSE. THE PROJECT WAS DONE IN TWO PHASES. IN THE FIRST PHASE, SUBJECTS WERE 42 DEAF GALLAUDET COLLEGE PREPARATORY STUDENTS, 26 HEARING FACULTY AND STAFF MEMBERS OF THE NEW MEXICO SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF, AND 14 HEARING GRADUATE STUDENTS AT GALLAUDET. THEIR PROGRAMS CONSISTED OF 17 LESSONS AND 8 FILMED TESTS. A RELATIONSHIP OF .90 OR ABOVE (WITH ONE EXCEPTION) WAS OBTAINED BETWEEN PRE- AND POST-TEST SCORES. ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE ON SCORES FROM VARIATIONS IN RATE OF PRESENTATION AND AMOUNT OF REPETITION OF THE STIMULUS MATERIAL FOR THE PREPARATORY STUDENTS SHOWED NONE OF THE EXPERIMENTAL TREATMENTS WERE SIGNIFICANTLY EFFECTIVE, BUT THERE WAS AN OVERALL MEAN GAIN (STATISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT, P IS LESS THAN .01) FOR READING WORDS AND FOR READING SENTENCES. FOR THE HEARING FACULTY GROUP AND THE GRADUATE STUDENT GROUP, DIFFERENCES IN RESPONSE METHOD (ORAL, WRITTEN, OR MANUAL) FAILED TO ACHIEVE STATISTICAL SIGNIFICANCE. IMPROVEMENT IN READING WORDS ACHIEVED STATISTICAL SIGNIFICANCE (P IS LESS THAN .01) FOR BOTH GROUPS, BUT MEAN GAIN FOR READING SENTENCES WAS NOT STATISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT FOR EITHER GROUP. THE FILM COURSE WAS JUDGED AN INEFFECTIVE INSTRUCTIONAL TOOL. THE SECOND PHASE UTILIZED A CHANGE IN PRESENTATION AND A REVISED, EXPANDED FILM PROGRAM (24 LESSONS) AND TWO FILM TESTS. FORTY-EIGHT HEARING COLLEGE STUDENTS SERVED AS SUBJECTS.  ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE SHOWED REPETITION WAS THE ONLY EXPERIMENTAL TREATMENT SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECTING SCORES FOR WORDS AND FOR SENTENCES (P IS GREATER THAN .01 AND LESS THAN .05). DATA FOR BOTH PHASES IS PRESENTED TABULARLY. APPENDIXES INCLUDE (1) CAPTIONED INSTRUCTIONS AND SCRIPTS FOR READING THE FILM COURSE AND THE TWO REVISED TESTS AND (2) COPIES OF FORMS USED FOR WRITTEN RESPONSES. REFERENCE LIST CITES 12 ITEMS.   [More]  Descriptors: Adults, College Students, Communication (Thought Transfer), Deafness

New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. Dona Ana Branch Community Coll. (1991). Dona Ana Branch Community College Annual Report, 1990-1991. During 1990-91, New Mexico State University's (NMSU's) Dona Ana Branch Community College (DABCC) continued to feel the effects of its fourth year of rapidly increasing enrollments. The defeat of bond issues that would have funded facility expansions resulted in critical space shortages. The 27% increase in headcount enrollments between spring 1990 and spring 1991 was accommodated by a 16% budget increase, a 22% increase in faculty and staff positions, and the use of classrooms on the NMSU campus and off-campus locations. Other highlights of 1990-91 included the following: (1) three new associate in applied science programs, in Fashion Merchandising, Fire Science and Aviation Technology, were instituted; (2) new adult basic education initiatives included the establishment of workplace literacy classes, the funding and development of the Student Literacy Corps project to train community college students as tutors, and a computerized reading development pilot program; (3) DABCC became fully responsible for educational programs offered at the U.S. Army's White Sands Education Center; (4) articulation with three school districts was expanded through the development of the Area Vocational School (AVS) program, which provides college-level occupational courses for high school juniors and seniors; (5) the Small Business Development Center counseled 92 new clients and sponsored 16 workshops and seminars; and (6) DABCC hosted three faculty members from a vocational school in Lerdo, Mexico, as part of the Lerdo-Las Cruces Sister City Program, helping DABCC faculty develop the cultural understanding needed to teach in a border environment. Enrollment data are provided. Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Articulation (Education), College Administration, College Outcomes Assessment

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