Bibliography: New Mexico (page 202 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Jacques Leclerc, Jacques Maurais, Nancy L. Gallenstein, Patricia Deloney, Mary Jo Clark, Joanne M. Herbert, Jeanette Martin, Robert F. McNergney, Boulder Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, and Gwen Gregory.

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Boulder, CO. (1998). Tuition and Fees in Public Higher Education in the West, 1998-99. Detailed Tuition and Fees Tables. This document provides tuition and fee data for public institutions in the following member and affiliated states in the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE): Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. Data tables cover: average annual percent change in tuition and fees, 1988-89 to 1998-99; average tuition and fees and average tuition and fees in constant (1987) dollars, 1998-99, 1997-98, 1993-94, and 1988-89; current versus inflation only charges, 1998-99; resident undergraduate and graduate tuition and fees at four-year institutions, 1998-99, 1997-98, 1993-94, and 1988-89; nonresident undergraduate and graduate tuition and fees at four-year institutions, 1998-99, 1997-98, 1993-94, and 1988-89; resident in-district/county and out-of-district/county tuition and fees at two-year institutions, 1998-99, 1997-98, 1993-94, and 1988-89; nonresident tuition and fees at two-year institutions, 1998-99, 1997-98, 1993-94, and 1988-89; average tuition and fees at four-year institutions by Carnegie classification and state, 1998-99, 1997-98, 1993-94, and 1988-89; and resident and nonresident undergraduate and resident and nonresident graduate tuition and fees at four-year institutions by Carnegie classification and state, 1998-99, 1997-98, 1993-94, and 1988-89. Appendixes include the Carnegie classification of institutions of higher education, a list by state of the number of four- and two-year institutions, the procedure for converting current dollars to constant dollars, and the methodology. Descriptors: Educational Finance, Enrollment Trends, Fees, Graduate Study

Leas, David E. (1995). New Mexico State University at Grants College Assessment and Planning Process. The College Assessment and Planning Process (CAPP) at New Mexico State University-Grants(NMSU-G) combines in a 2-year cycle the processes of assessment of student academic achievement, review of program effectiveness, strategic planning, and institutional development. Virtually all faculty and staff are involved in the process, which features individually designed assessment strategies, and program and institutional development throughout the 2-year cycle. Assessment activities are conducted on an ongoing basis. These activities include classroom assessment and classroom research; as well as assessments of instructional programs, instructional support, adult basic education, student services, outreach services, and institutional support. In addition to assessment activities, focus groups provide the means of developing integrated statements of strengths, concerns, and action plans. Focus group activities occur primarily in the second (i.e., fall) semester of the four-semester CAPP sequence, with groups identifying strengths and concerns related to instruction, student services, outreach programs, and institutional support. During alternate spring semesters, the campus director brings together key players from all college functions to conduct focus group institutional planning activities. All college employees and representatives from the community are invited to participate in a retreat where college-level strengths and concerns are identified and an action plan is developed. Implementation of the action plans may require the following 2 years of the sequence. After the institutional action plan has been fully implemented, the Alpha Group conducts a review of the operation of the complete cycle of the CAPP projects. The role of institutional research in the CAPP process is two-fold: completing institution-wide research projects (e.g., student, employee, and community surveys) and coaching and advising employees in various departments as they develop individual assessment projects.   [More]  Descriptors: College Outcomes Assessment, College Planning, Community Colleges, Educational Quality

Gallenstein, Nancy L. (1998). Migration and Life of Hispanics in Utah. This paper presents a historical and cultural overview of the migration and life of Hispanics in Utah and identifies three themes: search for a better life, need for and acquisition of a sense of belonging, and substance of the Hispanic people. Over the past 4 centuries, Hispanics have migrated to Utah from New Mexico, Mexico, and Central and South America. A brief history of Hispanics in Utah, beginning in the 1500s, reveals that the search for a better life was the primary reason for moving there, whether it was to escape political turmoil or recession, to avoid crime in larger urban areas, or simply to earn income and return to their homeland. Utah Hispanics satisfied their need to belong by maintaining their cultural heritage through various practices and support systems, including the use of Spanish, special foods, festivals, traditional holidays, and interactive art forms such as music and dance. Churches, social organizations, and mutual aid societies have been important factors in maintaining Hispanic culture. Spanish language newspapers, magazines, and radio stations serve the Hispanic population, which has seen most of its growth since World War II and is presently the fastest growing minority group in Utah. As such, Hispanics are also affecting the demographics of Utah's educational system. The Hispanic population has experienced bias and discrimination in schools and the wider community, and has been offered secondary work positions, often because of low educational levels. Yet the value system and culture that the majority of Hispanics maintain have resulted in a strong work ethic and family support system. (Contains 23 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Church Programs, Cultural Maintenance, Ethnic Discrimination, Hispanic American Culture

Mihesuah, Devon A., Ed. (1998). Natives and Academics: Researching and Writing about American Indians. This anthology provides Native perspectives on the ethics of researching, writing about, and teaching about American Indians, and may be used as a text for discussion in American Indian Studies classes. Leading Native scholars discuss the representativeness of Native informants, the merits of various data collection methods, the role and veracity of oral histories, the marketing of Native culture and history, debates about cultural essentialism, and the ethical violations involved in teaching or writing about sacred and other private knowledge. Following an introduction (Devon A. Mihesuah), chapters are: (1) "American Indian History or Non-Indian Perceptions of American Indian History?" (Angela Cavender Wilson); (2) "Grandmother to Granddaughter: Generations of Oral History in a Dakota Family" (Angela Cavender Wilson); (3) "Commonalty of Difference: American Indian Women and History" (Devon A. Mihesuah); (4) "Special Problems in Teaching Leslie Marmon Silko's 'Ceremony'" (Paula Gunn Allen); (5) "Comfortable Fictions and the Struggle for Turf: An Essay Review of 'The Invented Indian: Cultural Fictions and Government Policies'" (Vine Deloria, Jr.); (6) "Ethics and Responsibilities in Writing American Indian History" (Donald L. Fixico); (7) "Licensed Trafficking and Ethnogenetic Engineering" (Susan A. Miller); (8) "American Indian Intellectualism and the New Indian Story" (Elizabeth Cook-Lynn); (9) "Cultural Imperialism and the Marketing of Native America" (Laurie Anne Whitt); (10) "On Revision and Revisionism: American Indian Representations in New Mexico" (Theodore S. Jojola); (11) "American Indian Studies Is for Everyone" (Duane Champagne); and (12) "Why Indian People Should Be the Ones To Write about Indian Education" (Karen Gayton Swisher). (Contains references in each chapter, author profiles, and an index.) Descriptors: American Indian Culture, American Indian Education, American Indian History, American Indian Studies

Herbert, Joanne M., Ed.; McNergney, Robert F., Ed. (1996). The Case of Deming, New Mexico: International Public Education. Multicultural Videocase Series. This guide accompanies one of a pair of videocases depicting educational life in Deming, New Mexico. The videocase includes 28 minutes of unstaged but edited videotape footage of teaching and learning in and around junior high and mid-high schools in Deming. The first section of the guide, "Teaching Note" (Todd Kent) contains a transcript of the videotape and questions designed to help instructors engage people in case-based discussions. In the teaching note section the videotape is divided into five segments: (1) Hank Dominguez, director of personnel for the Deming Schools, provides background on the district's practice of educating students from Mexico; (2) Paulette Quarrell, a teacher of junior-high school English, teaches a class on descriptive writing and reflects on her life as a teacher; (3) Ray Trejo conducts a bilingual class at the mid-high school for students from Palomas, Mexico, and describes his reasons for teaching; (4) students who live in Palomas, Mexico, and attend Trejo's class share some thoughts about going to school in Deming; and (5) Dominguez reflects on the complexity of the issue of educating students from Mexico in the Deming Schools–the public's attitudes, bureaucratic wrangles, and reasons for persisting despite the opposition. The second section, which comprises about three quarters of the guide, presents three critical perspectives on the video written by Mary E. Dilworth, Lisa Sparaco, and Roberta Maldonado. Each of these essays presents its author's own perspective in terms of her own experience, both personal and professional. Each essay addresses the issues, questions of professional knowledge, and suggested actions and possible consequences.   [More]  Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Case Studies, Higher Education, Instructional Improvement

Gregory, Gwen (1998). The Library Services and Technology Act: New Directions in Federal Funding for Libraries. Public Libraries are an important service traditionally provided by local government in the United States. The national government has furnished assistance in the form of grants to the states since the passage of the Library Services Act in 1956. In 1996, the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) became law, representing major changes to these grant programs. Emphasis of the federal government's grant program for libraries has changed, and administration has moved to a new agency, the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS). This paper describes the transition to LSTA, analyzes the implications of the change, and examines the LSTA process in the larger context of models of intergovernmental relations. Research for this study consisted of both a survey and case studies of selected states. A questionnaire was sent to LSTA coordinators in the 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia, and then individual case studies were conducted in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, and Massachusetts. Survey results indicated that the states are increasing their emphasis on technology in LSTA programs. State LSTA coordinators generally approved of the IMLS and rated it as doing a better job than the previous administering agency. The case studies illustrate the variation between states in use of LSTA funds. Following an examination of several models of intergovernmental relations, a modified version of Wright's (1988) coordinate-authority model is proposed to describe the LSTA process. This model appears to best describe the federal-state-local relations which presently exist in the context of library funding. The survey and interview questions are appended.   [More]  Descriptors: Case Studies, Change, Federal Aid, Federal Programs

Clark, Mary Jo (1993). The Economic Impact of San Juan College on San Juan County, New Mexico, 1991-92. A study was conducted of the economic impact of San Juan College (SJC) in Farmington, New Mexico, on businesses and employment in San Juan County during fiscal year (FY) 1991-92. The five components used to measure the college's tangible economic impact on the local community were SJC's total expenditures in FY 1991-92 used to buy goods and services from businesses and agencies in the county; the portion of employee salaries and wages spent in the county; student expenses in the community related to college attendance; local expenditures of persons who visited the county because of the college or its employees; and the indirect business volume generated by these direct expenditures. This indirect business volume is the result of re-spending by the initial recipient, and is estimated through the application of a mathematical multiplier. Data were drawn from business office records, a survey of faculty and staff, and estimates of student and visitor expenditures. Study results for FY 1991-92 included the following: (1) total direct SJC operating and construction expenditures in the county were $4.2 million; (2) local expenditures by employees totalled $3.5 million; (3) estimated student expenditures totalled $7.6 million; (4) direct SJC economic impact on the San Juan County totalled $15.4 million, with an additional indirect impact of $15.4 million, for a total of $30.8 million, representing 5.1 times the total county fiscal support to the college during the same period; (5) college direct employment and support positions created a total of 1,329 full-time positions in the county; and (6) total SJC economic impact on the county showed a 50% increase since FY 1987-88. Data tables are included.   [More]  Descriptors: Community Colleges, Community Surveys, Cost Effectiveness, Costs

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Boulder, CO. (1998). Tuition and Fees in Public Higher Education in the West, 1997-98. Detailed Tuition and Fees Tables. This document provides tuition and fee data for public institutions in the following member and affiliated states in the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE): Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. Data tables cover: average annual percent change in tuition and fees, 1987-88 to 1997-98; average tuition and fees and average tuition and fees in constant (1987) dollars, 1997-98, 1996-97, 1992-93, and 1987-88; current versus inflation only charges, 1997-98; resident undergraduate and graduate tuition and fees at four-year institutions, 1997-98, 1996-97, 1992-93, and 1987-88; nonresident undergraduate and graduate tuition and fees at four-year institutions, 1997-98, 1996-97, 1992-93, and 1987-88; resident in-district/county and out-of-district/county tuition and fees at two-year institutions, 1997-98, 1996-97, 1992-93, and 1987-88; nonresident tuition and fees at two-year institutions, 1997-98, 1996-97, 1992-93, and 1987-88; average tuition and fees at four-year institutions by Carnegie classification and state, 1997-98, 1996-97, 1992-93, and 1987-88; and resident and nonresident undergraduate and resident and nonresident graduate tuition and fees at four-year institutions by Carnegie classification and state, 1997-98, 1996-97, 1992-93, and 1987-88. Three appendixes include the Carnegie classification of institutions of higher education, the procedure for converting current dollars to constant dollars, and the methodology.  Descriptors: Educational Finance, Enrollment Trends, Fees, Graduate Study

Hussain, K.M.; Leestamper, Robert (1968). Survey on Criteria of Teaching Effectiveness at New Mexico State University. In a questionnaire survey designed at the University of Toledo to determine the ranking of criteria of effective teaching, faculty, students and alumni at New Mexico State University agreed that "being well prepared for class" was the most important criterion. This ranking was upheld by 10 subgroups of faculty (faculty by years of service, teaching or administrative, and faculty by colleges), except for the College of Education which ranked "motivating students to do their best" as the most important criterion. The 3 groups all gave low rankings to research-related criteria and criteria concerned with off-campus community relations. The criterion of "making appearances which assist programs of community organization" was ranked as LEAST important. When criteria used in the faculty merit rating was compared to criteria used in the questionnaire, it was found that 4 criteria ranked in the top 10 in the survey do not appear in the Merit Rating Form, whereas 4 listed in the bottom 10 of the survey do, suggesting that the Form should be redesigned. The same pattern of discrepancy and implied need for change was evident when the questionnaire was compared with the University's most widely used student evaluation form. Patterns of rankings suggest that teaching faculty are being evaluated according to a different scale by administrative faculty. Rankings by subgroups of faculty, student and alumni indicate interesting divergencies. In identifying attitudes concerning teacher effectiveness, this study should provide a basis for discussion by administrators and faculty on how to devise more equitable and satisfact"ry evaluation procedures.   [More]  Descriptors: Administrator Attitudes, Community Responsibility, Evaluation, Faculty

Tompkins, Richard; Deloney, Patricia (1994). Rural Students at Risk in Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. This report explores the situation of at-risk students in small and rural schools in Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, and compares this information to the at-risk student situation nationwide. In order to explore both the complexity and the degree of risk of dropping out in rural school settings, research questions were posed concerning the nature and incidence of at-risk students in rural schools; related characteristics and behaviors of rural families, students, communities, and schools; insights gleaned from social theory; and perceptions of rural educators and parents of the at-risk problem. A research review examines: (1) background characteristics associated with risk, including socioeconomic status, minority group status, limited English proficiency, low parental educational attainment, mobility, psychosocial factors, and gender; (2) student behaviors such as participation in school, passive and active disengagement, substance abuse, low achievement, work, and sexuality; (3) school practices related to student retention, course failure and poor grades, suspension and expulsion, and ability grouping; (4) contextual variables, including rural school characteristics, school size, school norms, rural community characteristics, and community norms; and (5) perceptions of educators, parents, and students. The literature indicates that the rural at-risk problem differs from the metropolitan situation in at least four ways: (1) lower dropout rates than in central cities, but also lower postsecondary continuation rates; (2) higher risk of adult unemployment due to lack of useful vocational training and employment options; (3) higher risk due to direct effects of isolation; and (4) lower student aspirations. Policy and program recommendations for rural at-risk students include individualizing education to meet student needs, developing a comprehensive plan, building collaborative partnerships, encouraging connections with students, building community-school linkages, program improvement, and investing in technology. Contains 146 references and definitions of geographic terms.   [More]  Descriptors: Context Effect, Dropout Characteristics, Dropout Research, Dropouts

Leclerc, Jacques, Ed.; Maurais, Jacques, Ed. (1994). Recueil des legislations linguistiques dans le monde. Tome VI: La Colombie, les Etats-Unis, le Mexique, Porto Rico at les traites internationaux (Record of World Language-Related Legislation. Volume VI: Colombia, the United States, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and International Treaties). The volume is one of a series of six listing language-related legislation around the world. It contains the texts, in French, of laws of Colombia, the United States federal and some state governments (California, Florida, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and New York), Mexico, and Puerto Rico, and those relating to international treaties, specifically those of Austria, Austria/Czechoslovakia, Austria/Italy, Italy/Yugoslavia, Turkey, Belgium/Netherlands, Europe, and the United Nations. The laws concern official languages, regional and minority languages, language maintenance, and language use in education, educational administration, public administration, the justice system, the armed forces, and international trade and intergovernmental relations. A subject index is included.   [More]  Descriptors: Educational Policy, Federal Government, Federal Legislation, Federal Regulation

Amodeo, Luiza B.; Martin, Jeanette (1982). Search for Quality: The Sophomore Diagnostic Screening Process in the Teacher Preparation Program at New Mexico State University. The sophomore screening process at New Mexico State University's College of Education, designed to assure quality and commitment in prospective teachers, has three major components. The first is pre-screening, which requires that students successfully complete coursework in orientation to education, introduction to human growth and behavior, English composition, and mathematics. In the second component, diagnostic tests are administered in science, mathematics, and written English. The third component involves an assessment of teaching potential in which students are assessed on the knowledge and skills of effective teaching. For this component, they plan and implement microteaching lessons in the college and in the field and complete written assignments. The activities are evaluated by the cooperating teacher and the university supervisor. Students meet frequently with their instructor to discuss their progress, identify strengths and weaknesses, and plan for appropriate remediation if necessary. At the end of the semester, the instructor makes final recommendations, prescriptions, and referrals for each student. Three categories of recommendations are made: (1) Specific courses may be recommended in math, science, classroom management, instructional planning, and remedial work in written English; (2) The student may be required to enroll in additional field practice if there is a question of lack of desire or potential to develop as a competent teacher; and (3) If serious doubts are raised about the student's probable success in the teacher preparation program, a selective review hearing is called. The student is informed of the purpose of the hearing, which is held to help the student make a decision regarding continuation in the program. Appended to this report are tables showing student grades and attendance for three semesters and an outline of the course requirements for the entire program. Descriptors: Admission Criteria, Core Curriculum, Curriculum Design, Diagnostic Tests

Leas, David E. (1993). Student Academic Achievement: Report to the Provost. In fall 1991, the faculty and staff of New Mexico State University-Alamogordo (NMSU-A) designed and implemented a strategic planning process which incorporates a comprehensive annual review of various aspects of student academic achievement (SAA). The faculty-based SAA assessment process includes activities focused on classroom instruction, student success by discipline, program-related successes, and the training and resources provided to support related research and improvement efforts. Many instructors have conducted classroom assessment activities, and some have worked together to study SAA in course or discipline groups. On an institutional level, efforts are underway to study entire groups of students, develop an SAA database, and study the possibility of an institution-wide standardized testing program. This report presents a brief review, by instructional division, of many of these study projects, including: (1) program-related studies in Developmental Mathematics, regular Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, Electronics Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Emergency Medical Technology; (2) assessment activities in seven art classes, four college-level English courses, and two reading classes; (3) employer and graduate satisfaction surveys and state board testing of nursing graduates, and SAA studies of early childhood education, secretarial administration, and photographic technology students; (4) a study of business and education students who transferred to the main campus and other classroom research projects conducted by social sciences instructors in the fields of economics and psychology; (5) institutional initiatives such as the cohort study; and (6) efforts related to in-service training, faculty evaluation, and the institutional planning process.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Classroom Research, College Outcomes Assessment, Community Colleges

New Mexico Commission on Higher Education. (1989). Institutional Planning Guidelines, 1989-1990. The strategic plan for higher education in New Mexico provided for a comprehensive statewide planning process involving all institutions and the Commission on Higher Education. The process includes 5-year institutional plans with annual updates according to guidelines established by the Commission. The guidelines provide information on timelines and data collection and specify content for the following sections of institutional planning documents: (1) a brief history of the development of the institution; (2) the governing board's official statement of institutional mission and goals; (3) a definition of the present role and scope of the institution, along with a summary of institutional intent for the next 5-year period; (4) a description and analysis of the external environment and the issues which coming trends will pose for the college; (5) an assessment of unique aspects of the institutional environment or any special opportunities for growth which would significantly affect the institution; (6) a description of college programs with particular emphasis on regional, national, new or innovative programs and program review and development; (7) information on policies for enrollment management (e.g., recruitment, admissions, enrollment, developmental studies programs, student support services, tuition and fees, cost of attendance, student financial aid, and articulation); (8) a description of current programs for outcomes assessment and placement and follow-up studies; (9) an overview of the current status of and the 5-year plan for faculty and staff development and personnel management; (10) an account of current and projected capital resources, including information on space usage, facilities maintenance, and equipment; (11) information on program accreditation; (12) projections of funding, equipment, and staffing needs over the next 5 years; and (13) a discussion of other planning issues unique to the individual institutions.   [More]  Descriptors: College Administration, College Governing Councils, College Planning, College Role

Twomey, Janine Louise (1991). Academic Performance and Retention in a Peer Mentor Program at a Two-Year Campus of a Four-Year Institution. The peer mentor program at the two-year campus of New Mexico State University at Alamogordo utilizes a stress prevention model of social support. In an effort to determine the most successful program design, two social support models were introduced into the program. In the first, 14 participants received individual, one-on-one support from a mentor, while in the second, 12 students received support in small groups from a single mentor. A control group of 15 students received no support. In both support conditions, students met with the mentor for 1 hour each week to discuss the campus and student-related issues, or to study. All study participants were new to the college. The two different support conditions were compared to assess effects on mentees' grades, retention, identification with the role of student, and psychological well-being. In addition, the effects of mentor-mentee similarity, and the performance and psychological well-being of the mentors were examined. Pre- and post-intervention questionnaires were used to assess psychological outcomes. Study results included the following: (1) the mentored students had higher grade point averages (GPAs) than the students who had no mentors, regardless of whether the mentoring took place in group or one-on-one settings; (2) students who had been mentored in groups returned the following semester at a higher rate than students with individual mentors or students in the control group; (3) there was virtually no change in commitment to the student role in any of the groups; (4) similarities in the attitudes and activities of the mentors and mentees had no effect on GPA or retention; and (5) a detrimental relationship was found between mentor-mentee similarity and the GPA of the mentor. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Community Colleges, Comparative Analysis, Coping

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