Bibliography: New Mexico (page 200 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Court of Appeals. Tenth Circuit., John C. Egermeier, Littleton Arapahoe County School District 6, Manuel Ruiz, Ronald W. Lopez, ROBERT W. ASHE, Mary Tom Riley, Laurel LeMieux Bland, Phoenix. Div. of Migrant Child Education. Arizona State Dept. of Public Instruction, and Kendall Blanchard.

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs. (1985). Oversight of the Indian Education Act. Hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs. United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session on Oversight of the Indian Education Act (Phoenix, AZ, December 6, 1984). The Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs met in Phoenix, Arizona, to hear the testimony of tribal witnesses in order to obtain tribal participation in the committee's national Indian policy. Thirty-seven representatives of tribal education organizations spoke about the Title IV programs of the Indian Education Act and the elementary and secondary education programs of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). In general, testimony concerned the need for continued and increased funding to insure equal educational opportunities for Native American students and the relationships among public, contract, and BIA programs for Indian students. Topics included the impact of parent participation and cultural education components of Title IV, school attendance boundaries, school closure and consolidation, the poor condition of BIA facilities, and the need to attract and retain qualified BIA teachers. This report contains the witnesses'summary remarks before the committee followed by their complete prepared statements and other material submitted for the record. The majority of witnesses represented Navajo organizations in Arizona and New Mexico. Other tribes represented included Pueblo, Papago, Hopi, Apache, and Pima.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Education, American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Cultural Education

Bland, Laurel LeMieux (1975). Visual Perception and Recall of School-Age Navajo, Hopi, Jicarilla Apache, and Caucasian Children of the Southwest including Results from a Pilot Study Among Eskimos and Athabascan School-Age Children of North Alaska. Monograph #5. The study determined if a significant difference was demonstrated between American Indians and Caucasians on visual perception and recall tasks associated with cognitive function. It was hypothesized that a significant difference existed between scores obtained by Indian children enrolled in reservation schools and that of Caucasian children enrolled in public schools of adjacent non-reservation urban communities, and between children from the different Indian tribes in scores obtained using the Visual Recall Ability Indicator. Any demonstrated difference was related to the learning styles of Indian children as they applied to implications for education of culturally different Indian children attending Indian schools. Utilizing the Visual Recall Ability Indicator, data were collected from 3,344 Indian students (ages 8-16) drawn from 18 reservation schools of the Navajo, Hopi, and Jicarilla Apache tribes, and from 797 Caucasian students drawn from 9 schools in the urban communities adjacent to the reservations (Farmington and Grants, New Mexico and Page, Arizona). Among the findings were that Indian boys and girls surpassed Caucasian boys and girls, and the Hopi students exceeded the performance of the Navajos and Apaches at the .05 level of confidence. The practical significance of the results was that the Indian sample population differs significantly from the Caucasian sample population in the basic cognitive strengths each population brings to formal schooling even though there may be differences in performance levels among the tribal groups tested.  Descriptors: Age Differences, Alaska Natives, American Indian Reservations, American Indians

Ruiz, Manuel, Jr. (1974). Mexican American Legal Heritage in the Southwest. Second Edition, 1974. By 1920, 72 years after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo brought hostilities between Mexico and the United States to an end, Mexican American exclusion from virtually every area of participation in the mainstream of American life had become institutionalized. With two cultures in conflict and new political power at stake, a series of legal actions had taken place which to this day affect the Mexican American. Thus, the legal history of the Southwest has enormous significance today. Presenting insights into the past, this book briefly discusses the extent to which the laws of the prior sovereign, Mexico, became or were incorporated into the laws of the Southwestern states. Topics covered are: the context and arrangement of California Codes, Mexican civil and municipal laws, Mexican county jurisdiction, water rights laws, community property laws, the cow-town marshal as a Mexican institution, Texas constitutions, education in Texas, Texas Common Law adoption, Mexican legal influence on mining laws, land titles in New Mexico, Spanish language use in legal proceedings and in schools, the admission of Mexican Americans to citizenship, and Mexican civil and human rights procedures. Descriptors: Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, Constitutional History, Cultural Background

Blanchard, Kendall (1974). Team Sports and Conflict Resolution Among the Mississippi Choctaw. Four hypotheses pertaining to conflict and its resolution in the team sport experience among seven Choctaw communities were tested: Choctaws have a unique conception of conflict vis-a-vis Anglos; this conception has a limiting effect on the exercise or occurrence of more dramatic forms of violence; this notion is reflected in Choctaw team sport behavior; and both modern and traditional sports among the Choctaw function as intercommunity conflict resolution mechanisms, serving either to act out or avoid potentially more dangerous types of disagreement. Data were collected between March and October 1974 via observations of various athletic events, discussions, structured interviews with individual athletes, and psychological tests (Multiple Affect Adjective Check List (MAACL) and nonstandardized projective plates). In 15 Choctaw and Anglo cases, the MAACL was used to elicit ideal attitudinal states associated with basketball participation. Additional data were obtained from several non-Choctaw groups in Philadelphia, Mississippi; Murfreesboro, Tennessee; and Zuni, New Mexico. Some findings were: while more aggressive, the Choctaws were more opposed to disruptive violence; Choctaws acted out the type of conflict necessary in athletic competition yet at the same time made a greater effort to avoid open hostility; and Choctaws were more concerned with the excellence of their personal performance than with winning. Descriptors: Aggression, American Indians, Anglo Americans, Athletics

FORBES, JACK (1967). ROUGH ROCK DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL. THE ROUGH ROCK DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL IS LOCATED IN NORTHEASTERN ARIZONA, WHERE THE NAVAJO LANGUAGE IS UNIVERSALLY SPOKEN BY THE NAVAJO PEOPLE. IT IS LOCATED ON A NAVAJO RESERVATION AND WAS DESIGNED AS A BIA EXPERIMENTAL SCHOOL TO SERVE 200 ELEMENTARY PUPILS, MOST OF WHOM ARE IN THE BOARDING SCHOOL SITUATION. AN OBJECTIVE OF THE SCHOOL IS TO GAIN INTENSIVE PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT. TO ATTAIN THIS GOAL, PARENTS ARE ENCOURAGED TO VISIT PUPIL CLASSROOMS AND TO PARTICIPATE IN ADULT EDUCATION CLASSES CONSISTING OF WEAVING, HANDICRAFT, BASKETRY, SILVER MAKING, AND READING AND WRITING THE NAVAJO LANGUAGE. THE ROUGH ROCK CURRICULUM FOR THE YOUNGSTERS INCLUDES–(1) THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE, (2) THE TEACHING OF NAVAJO AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (A FEW ANGLO AND HOPI INDIAN CHILDREN ARE ENROLLED), AND (3) THE TEACHING OF NAVAJO HISTORY. TEST RESULTS ARE AVAILABLE, COMPARING PROGRAMS IN ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE AT ROUGH ROCK WITH THAT AT MANY FARMS, WHICH IS ALSO A BIA SCHOOL. THIS SPEECH WAS DELIVERED AT A CONFERENCE ON RESEARCH AND ACTIVITY IN THE LANGUAGE ARTS FOR THE PRE-PRIMARY/PRIMARY CULTURALLY DIVERSE NON-ENGLISH SPEAKING CHILD, HELD IN ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO, JUNE 4-6, 1967, SPONSORED BY THE SOUTHWESTERN COOPERATIVE EDUCATIONAL LABORATORY, INC.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, American Indians, Community Involvement, Cultural Activities

Lopez, Ronald W.; And Others (1976). Chicanos in Higher Education: Status and Issues. Chicano Studies Center Publication, Monograph No. 7. Compiled to provide a national picture of Chicanos in higher education, this report provides a profile of Chicanos in higher education, with emphasis on enrollment patterns. Based on census and Office of Civil Rights data, the data are mainly for 1970, although information for other years both before and after 1970 is also included. Information pertains to: the response of higher education to Chicanos; Chicano representation in higher education; issues facing Chicanos in higher education (access, retention and attrition, faculty, administration, funding, instruction and curriculum, Chicano Studies, research, and survival); the eligible population; undergraduate and graduate enrollment; enrollment by fields of study; and brief case studies of select institutions. The data indicates that Chicanos are under-represented at all levels of higher education. The proportional representation of Spanish-surnamed people declines the higher the level of education. Relatively higher percentages of Chicano enrollment are found in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas which have the highest percentages of Chicanos in the general population. High percentages of Spanish-surnamed people are also found in the educational institutions of Florida and New York where the Cuban and Puerto Rican populations respectively are concentrated. These 7 states accounted for 83% and 80% of all Spanish-surnamed enrollment in higher education in 1970 and 1972 respectively.   [More]  Descriptors: College Freshmen, College Students, Declining Enrollment, Dental Schools

National Issues Forums, Dayton, OH. (1988). Literacy Program. National Issues Forums Special Report. In the spring of 1988, 33 representatives from 20 institutions or organizations sponsoring National Issues Forum (NIF) literacy programs attended a national conference in Washington, D.C. Throughout the conference, representatives from the organizations sponsoring NIF literacy programs made statements on the importance of NIF as a tool for learning basic skills and as a means of giving citizens who would otherwise be left out the nation's public policy debate a chance to take part in it. Updates were presented on NIF literacy programs for English-as-a-second-language, adult basic education, and General Educational Development program students on three topics: "Freedom of Speech: Where To Draw the Line,""The Superpowers: Nuclear Weapons and National Security," and "The Trade Gap; Regaining the Competitive Edge." (This document includes brief reports on the NIF forums held in the following locations: Brooklyn, New York; Port Washington, New York; Mound, Minnesota; Mt. Vernon, Georgia; Los Lunas, New Mexico; South San Francisco, California; Anoka County, Minnesota; and Shakopee, Minnesota.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Adult Literacy, Literacy Education, Program Development

ASHE, ROBERT W. (1966). SURVEY REPORT–NAVAJO COMMUNITY COLLEGE. THIS PLAN FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A NAVAJO JUNIOR COLLEGE GOES INTO ALL ASPECTS OF ITS ORGANIZATION. IT DESCRIBES THE PRESENT NAVAJO SCHOOL SYSTEM, WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF MISSION, PUBLIC, AND BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS OPERATIONS. FINANCIAL HELP TO STUDENTS WANTING MORE THAN A HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION IS PRESENTLY INADEQUATE, THROUGH INCREASING. IF…   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, College Planning, Community Study, Course Descriptions

Egermeier, John C. (1968). Project Vision: A Final Report. The objectives of Project Vision were to undertake a program to encourage reading-improvement and stimulate interest in higher education and vocational information for the students at Chilocco Indian Agricultural School and to provide practice teaching experience to Oklahoma State University Student Teachers. Several activities were undertaken to accomplish this goal including: (1) identifying a supervisor of project activities; (2) identifying student teachers interested in teaching disadvantaged students and encouraging them to make school visits; (3) identifying 15 to 20 eleventh graders with high academic potentials and introducing them to campus life; (4) establishing an 8-week accredited summer program at Chilocco aimed at involving student teachers with the Indian students; (5) encouraging a one-week home visit by student teachers to familiarize him with the Chilocco culture; and (6) providing a reading improvement and a vocational information center. Each activity was evaluated, all proving to be relatively successful and substantially meeting the stated objectives. Chilocco personnel indicated an interest in continuing the program. The appendices include further details on the reading program and reports of visits to Arizona, New Mexico, and the Northwest.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Counseling, Disadvantaged Youth, Education

Court of Appeals. Tenth Circuit. (1974). Serna et al. v. Portales Municipal Schools et al. The appellees, all Spanish surnamed Americans, contended that the appellants deprived them of their right to equal protection of the laws. After hearing all evidence, the trial court had ordered the Portales schools to submit a plan for remedial action within 90 days. Appellees thereafter filed a Motion for Hearing to hear their objections to the appellants' plan and to introduce their own proposed bilingual-bicultural program. After reviewing both parties' programs, the trial court entered final judgment, which included: all students in grades 1-3 receive 60 minutes per day bilingual instruction; a bicultural outlook be incorporated in as many subject areas as practicable; testing procedures be established to test the results of the bilingual instruction and adjustments made accordingly; and junior high students be tested for English language proficiency and, if necessary, further bilingual instruction should be available. Appellants appealed, positing two grounds for reversal: appellees neither had standing nor were suitable parties to maintain this suit as a class action; and failure to afford a program of bilingual instruction to meet appellees' needs did not deny them equal protection of the law when such needs were not the result of discriminatory actions. The U.S. District Court for the District of New Mexico (District Court No. 8994); Judges Hill, McWilliams, and Durfee) upheld the trial court's plan as just, equitable and feasible. Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Civil Rights, Court Litigation, Educational Discrimination

Riley, Mary Tom; And Others (1988). Serving 2,500 Preschoolers Mechanically: Should We Be Serving You. The paper briefly describes TIP (Telecommunications Intervention Program), a service which delivers preliminary Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) for Head Start handicapped children based on a computerized data base of long range goals, short term objectives, and specific related learning activities. This high technology expert system was developed by experts in the areas of early childhood, psychology, speech pathology, and special education. IEPs are provided for ten handicapping conditions (blind, deaf, emotional disturbance, health impaired, hearing impaired, learning disabled, mental retardation, orthopedic impairment, speech/language deficits, and visual impairments) as well as the gifted condition. Users of the system screen the child using standard instruments and submit data concerning chronological age, suspected handicapping condition, and developmental age/s. Data may be communicated by a telephone conference, mail, or direct computer link. Users receive a printout of goals and objectives accompanied by referenced curriculum, materials, and recommended activities. The rapid return of IEPs allows a child to receive and master several plans in a year. During the second and third years of operation over 5000 IEPs were implemented and over 800 hot line calls were made for purposes of crisis intervention, short term counseling, and other information services. The program serves Head Start Programs in the states of Louisiana, Arkansas, Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico.   [More]  Descriptors: Computer Managed Instruction, Disabilities, High Risk Students, Individualized Education Programs

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor. (1988). Hearing on H.R. 1801, To Reauthorize the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Human Resources of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session (September 11, 1987). This document presents witnesses' testimonies and prepared statements from the first of a series of Congressional hearings on the reauthorization of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act. Opening remarks are included from Representatives Dale Kildee, Augustus Hawkins, Thomas Tauke, and Thomas Sawyer. Issues are raised about the jail removal mandate, the violent and repeat offender problem, minority incarceration, the valid court order, and the distribution of funds and special emphasis grant priorities. Witnesses providing testimony include: (1) Barry Krisberg, president, National Council on Crime and Delinquency; (2) Richard Gardell, steering committee member, National Coalition of State Juvenile Justice Advisory Groups; (3) Gerald Radcliffe, chairman, Legislation and Governmental Regulations Committee, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges; (4) Luke Quinn, chairman, Juvenile Justice Subcommittee, National Association of Counties; (5) James W. Brown, project director, Community Research Associates, Champaign, Illinois; (6) Guy Fournier, vice chair, Children and Family Council for Prevention Programs, Hyde Park, Vermont, accompanied by youth member Christopher Fleury; (7) Augustine Baca, executive director, Youth Development, Inc., Albuquerque, New Mexico; and (8) Beth Farnbach, executive director, Temple-Leap, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Prepared statements, letters, and supplemental materials are included.   [More]  Descriptors: Delinquency, Delinquency Prevention, Federal Legislation, Hearings

Arizona State Dept. of Public Instruction, Phoenix. Div. of Migrant Child Education. (1975). Arizona's Annual Migrant Child Teacher Institute (6th, June 9 – June 27, 1975). Since 1970, the Migrant Child Teacher and Aide Institute has introduced approximately 175 Arizona teachers and 50 aides to new curriculum concepts in the areas of oral language development, reading, and individualized instruction. Jointly selected by the building principal, school superintendent, and the State Director of Migrant Education, participants then return in the fall and implement many of the recommended changes by training other teachers, creating demonstration classrooms, recommending specific instructional materials, and aides serving in instructional capacities. At the end, teachers are asked to evaluate the overall three-week institute on the basis of location and facilities, workshop content, consultants, general comments, and pre-post self-rating scale. Aides are asked to evaluate each consultant, what they felt was the most enjoyable feature of the Aide Institute, and make suggestions for the following year. This annual report presents the reactions of the participants during 1975. Overall their reactions were very favorable. The report also includes: the English and Spanish language structures used in the Oral Language Evaluation; the curriculum guide series used in Gallup, New Mexico; the scope and sequence chart used in the reading component; the Institute certificate; and a listening of past and present participants. Descriptors: Individualized Instruction, Inservice Teacher Education, Institutes (Training Programs), Language Acquisition

Read, Betty (1969). The Community-Junior College. Along with a brief history of American junior colleges and the principles on which they were established and currently operate, this paper discusses their main problems: (1) sources of funds (state aid, local taxes, tuition, fees) and the proportionate amounts received from each; (2) the expected diversity of courses to satisfy remedial, academic, vocational, technical, community, and transfer needs; and (3) control, whether local or state. The trend is to state control because of funding, the efficiencies of central planning and coordination, and the mobile population. Listed are the advantages and drawbacks of four levels of control: a public school district, an independent district, a college or university branch, and the state level. Descriptions and a few statistics are given for typical students' background, academic ability, employment, occupational choice, motivation, attitudes, and age range. Included also is a brief description of the seven principles developed by AAJC for the legal establishment of junior colleges. The author then details the establishment and status of the 2-year college in New Mexico–its organization, boundaries, affiliations, course of study, taxation, bonds, and governance. The last chapter deals with program specifications for a possible college in Albuquerque. The essential program areas are academic affairs, occupational training (following national and regional manpower needs), general and continuing education, community services, and student personnel.   [More]  Descriptors: Educational Planning, State Legislation, Two Year Colleges

Arapahoe County School District 6, Littleton, CO. (1970). A Teaching Guide and Experience Units K-12. Social Studies. Grade Four. The unit experiences for the K-12 curriculum guide, including these for grade 4, are outlined in SO 001 139. These units initiate the study of geographic regions of the world. Emphasis in these area studies is placed on the regional topography, geographic factors, and people's economic, social, and cultural adjustment to their environment or surroundings. Overview, objectives, motivational, developmental, and review activities, and content for each of the various sub-units are summarized: 1) Use of Map and Globe –community, country or national community, continent, world, solar system; 2) Metropolitan Study –historical development of Denver, demography, points of interest, government, economic characteristics, and comparison with New York City; 3) Island Regions –general, and detailed area study of Japan including physical features, climate, history, culture, occupations, transportation and communication, education, and government; 4) Man at High Latitudes –Eskimo and Lapp and life on tundra lands; 5) Desert Lands (Saudi Arabia) –comparisons with the desert lands of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah, with possible cultural comparisons; 6) Hot, Wet Lands of the Rain Forest (Amazon and Congo); 7) Polder, Land from the Sea (Netherlands); 8) Mountain Region (Equador); 9) Ranchlands in Argentina and the United States; and, 10) California, Land of Contrast –comparison with all the other areas of the world. Evaluation objectives and techniques are also enumerated. SO 001 138 through SO 001 144 are related units.   [More]  Descriptors: Adjustment (to Environment), Area Studies, Concept Teaching, Critical Thinking

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