Bibliography: New Mexico (page 196 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Blanch S. Williams, Robert M. Schacht, Norwood Andrews, Boulder Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Nancy B. Eager, ELIZABETH OTT, Benet Tvedten, Julie Baldwin, Lee Swanson, and Elaine Trudeau.

Tvedten, Benet, Comp. (1971). An American Indian Anthology. The anthology is intended to be a discovery for the many Americans whose superficial knowledge of the American Indians has been derived from history books, Hollywood films, and other stereotyped views of the Indian culture. Understanding and appreciation of a particular culture can be found in the stories and poetry of the people. This small collection of creative writing is by contemporary Indians. Some of the contributors are professional writers; others are not. Remembrance of the old ways, present-day realities, and future hopes are described in these short stories, poems, legends, and narratives. Much of the material for this book originally appeared in other publications, for example, "Woman Singing," by Simon J. Ortiz, and "The Man From Washington," by James Welch, first appeared in "The American Indian Speaks"; and the poetry of Gerald Robert Vizenor is from his book, "South of the Painted Stones." Other materials were written at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Descriptors: American Indians, Anthologies, Legends, Literature

Kotin, Lawrence, Comp.; Eager, Nancy B., Comp. (1977). Due Process in Special Education: Resource Book. The resource book on state due process provisions in special education is a compilation of materials received from the state education or special education directors who responded to letters sent to each of the 50 states requesting copies of current administrative provisions on the subject. Materials, which are provided in sections for each of 48 states and the District of Columbia, include the following: procedural safeguards (Alabama), conditions and standards relating to identification and placement (Arizona), rules for the administration of the Handicapped Children's Educational Act (Colorado), Connecticut laws concerning children requiring special education, an administrative manual for exceptional child programs (Delaware), due process procedures for Idaho's exceptional students, the Kansas state plan for special education, Kentucky administrative regulations, an excerpt from special education rules and regulations reference manual (Montana), New Jersey administrative code, administrative hearing procedures (New Hampshire), special education eligibility process (New Mexico), program planning for handicapped students (North Dakota), proposed due process safeguards (Ohio), guidelines for planning educational facilities (Tennessee), delivery of services in Virginia, and West Virginia's state plan amendment. Descriptors: Administration, Delivery Systems, Due Process, Elementary Secondary Education

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Boulder, CO. (1992). Joined or Unconnected? A Look at State Economic Development and Higher Education Plans. Higher Education and the Economy of the West. Working Paper #5. This paper, one of a series from the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education's project "Higher Education and the Economy of the West," summarizes and analyzes economic development and higher education master plans in 16 western states, looking particularly at how planning for economic development and higher education articulate and finds disjunction. It sees higher education's view of its role as that of promoting broader access to education, providing career and job training relevant to future needs, and participating in product and market development. But economic developers look to higher education to educate a diverse workforce in increasingly sophisticated skills, provide necessary research and technical development assistance, participate in public/private partnerships for economic development, develop the potential of all educational sectors in relation to economic needs, and help attract new business and industry to the state. Separate statewide summaries of economic development and higher education plans are included for Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado; Hawaii, Idaho, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. An appendix notes methodology and lists state sources. Descriptors: Access to Education, Career Planning, Curriculum Development, Economic Development

OTT, ELIZABETH (1967). THE LANGUAGE AND READING EDUCATION PROGRAM OF THE SOUTHWEST EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY. THE BASIC CONCEPTS USED IN DEVELOPING THE LANGUAGE AND READING EDUCATION PROGRAM WERE–(1) ALL HUMAN ORGANISMS ARE ESSENTIALLY ALIKE AND THEREFORE MAN'S BASIC NEEDS ARE THE SAME, (2) FUNDAMENTAL LIKENESSES EXIST IN ALL CULTURES, (3) CHILDREN FIRST INTRODUCED TO THE DIMENSIONS OF THEIR OWN CULTURE ARE READY TO MOVE TOWARD UNDERSTANDING THE OTHER CULTURES, AND (4) LANGUAGE IS A SPECIAL WAY OF LOOKING AT THE WORK AND COMMUNICATING THIS WORLD TO OTHERS. MATERIALS FOR THIS PROGRAM ARE TO BE ESPECIALLY DESIGNED TO ATTACK THE LANGUAGE PROBLEMS OF LINGUISTICALLY HANDICAPPED CHILDREN OF THE SOUTHWEST. BY FOCUSING ATTENTION ON SPECIFIC GROUPS WHO SUFFER THE MOST IN TERMS OF LANGUAGE DEPRIVATION, IT HAS BEEN POSSIBLE TO IDENTIFY THE LINGUISTIC CHARACTERISTICS WHICH CAUSE LEARNING DIFFICULTIES. IN ORDER TO EVALUATE THIS PROGRAM, THE FOLLOWING AREAS ARE PROPOSED AS BASES FOR FORMULATING HYPOTHESES WHICH WILL BE TESTED LATER–(1) PRIMACY OF ORAL LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT, (2) MEANINGFUL CONTENT, (3) LANGUAGE SKILLS, AND (4) CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING. THIS SPEECH WAS DELIVERED AT A WORKING CONFERENCE ON RESEARCH AND ACTIVITY IN THE LANGUAGE ARTS FOR THE PRE-PRIMARY/PRIMARY CULTURALLY DIVERSE NON-ENGLISH SPEAKING CHILD, ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO, JUNE 4-6, 1967.   [More]  Descriptors: Blacks, Cultural Differences, Culture, Disadvantaged

Klassen, Frank H., Ed.; Gollnick, Donna M., Ed. (1977). Pluralism and the American Teacher: Issues and Case Studies. This publication is a collection of papers and reports on major issues in the area of multicultural teacher education–curriculum, research and development, legislation, and performance based teacher education–and descriptions of multicultural programs in existence. The first section, which deals with the issues in multicultural teacher education, presents five topics: (1) The Implications of Multicultural Education for Teacher Education; (2) Curriculum for Multicultural Teacher Education; (3) Education That is Multicultural and P/CBTE–Discussion and Recommendations for Teacher Education; (4) Research and Development in Multicultural Education; and (5) Ethnic/Cultural Diversity as Reflected in State and Federal Educational Legislation and Policies. The second section presents case studies of multicultural teacher education: (1) Development of the Multicultural Program–School of Education, University of Michigan; (2) Multicultural Education Evolvement at the University of Houston; (3) Human Relations Preparation in Teacher Education–The Wisconsin Experience; (4) Community, Home, Cultural Awareness and Language Training–A Design for Teacher Education; (5) The Cultural Awareness Center at the University of New Mexico; and (6) Multicultural Education Training for Teachers. The appendixes contain selected multicultural resources, notes about the contributors, and a listing of the National Advisory Council and Commission on Multicultural Education.   [More]  Descriptors: Case Studies, Competency Based Teacher Education, Cross Cultural Studies, Cross Cultural Training

Brickell, Henry M.; And Others (1974). Taxonomy and Profiles of Career Education. Volumes 1-4. The taxonomy is designed to characterize, summarize, and generalize about the career education movement. It describes career education projects by the following paradigm: topics, dimensions, measures, and descriptors. (The four topics are: school district, career education project, career education instructional program, and evaluation of career education project.) Volume 1 provides an 11-page working outline of the taxonomy developed by an analysis of 72 representative elementary and secondary career education projects throughout the United States. It also contains 68 easily-readable charts which analyze to the nearest 10 percent the data of the 72 projects in a form corresponding to the taxonomic outline. Volume 1 also contains an excerpt from the U. S. Office of Education publication, Career Education: Programs and Progress, and 60 pages of sample career education project director's interview forms. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain unevenly detailed, alphabetically listed, profiles of over 200 career education projects in the 50 States, which follow this form: district and project information, approach to career education, project staff, school staff, training, community resources, curriculum materials, and ideas that worked. Volume 2 contains profiles for Alabama–Iowa; Volume 3 for Kansas–New Mexico; Volume 4 for New York–Wyoming.   [More]  Descriptors: Career Education, Classification, Data Analysis, Data Collection

Schacht, Robert M.; Baldwin, Julie (1997). The Vocational Rehabilitation of American Indians Who Have Alcohol or Drug Abuse Disorders. Executive Summary. Begun in 1993, a 5-year project examined treatment modalities and outcomes and counselor and client attitudes related to American Indian or Alaska Native vocational rehabilitation (VR) clients with alcoholism or substance abuse problems. Specifically, surveys and focus groups examined elements of successful substance abuse treatment and VR programs, areas of social-cognitive dissonance between VR counselors and their clients, and the use of culturally relevant treatment modalities different from those used in mainstream programs. A 1993 survey of 31 "exemplary" substance abuse treatment centers recommended by VR counselors, and a 1996 followup survey of 14 of these centers found that most centers extensively incorporated American Indian personnel and cultural practices into the treatment process, but success rates over 50 percent were rare. In the followup survey, all programs based "most" or "some" of their treatment methodology on Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). Treatment orientations based on Native American traditional healing did not claim better success rates than other orientations. Counselor and client focus groups in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona discussed eligibility for VR services, effects of the substance abuse problem and state of recovery on the VR process, client motivations, training needs, and factors contributing to or impeding recovery. Areas of congruence and disparity in counselor and client attitudes are discussed. Recommendations are presented for VR counselor training and program improvement, and the 12 steps of AA are listed.    [More]  Descriptors: Alaska Natives, Alcoholism, American Indians, Client Attitudes (Human Services)

Mattingly, Richard C., Comp. (1962). Financial Assistance for College Students: Undergraduate. Bulletin, 1962, No. 11. OE-55027. [Part I], Office of Education, US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. This directory presents information relating to institutional financial aid programs which were active during the 1959-60 academic year. To collect information for this directory, over 2,100 copies of a questionnaire, "Survey of Institutional Financial Assistance to Undergraduate Students, 1959-60," were mailed to institutions of higher education, their branch campuses, and certain professional schools as listed in the Educational Directory, Part 3: Higher Education, 1959-60. The resulting information was supplied by officials of the 1,677 institutions listed herein. A table of gross figures is also included which summarizes, by States, institutional scholarships, undergraduate employment, undergraduate loans, and all loans made under the National Defense Student Loan Program. (Contains 5 footnotes, and 1 table.) [Due to its size, this volume has been processed as two separate parts. The first part (ED544000) includes the foreword through the descriptions of institutions and their student financial aid programs 1959-60, alphabetically by state up to and including New Jersey. The second part (ED544001) includes the remaining descriptions by state beginning with New Mexico through the index. The cover page and table of contents are repeated in the second and third parts. Best copy available has been provided.]   [More]  Descriptors: Higher Education, Scholarships, Campuses, Undergraduate Students

Andrews, Norwood, Jr., Ed. (1970). Proceedings of the Vanderbilt Invitational Conference on High School Portuguese. Final Report. This Conference was sponsored by the U.S. Office of Education, the Gulbenkian Foundation, Inc., United Merchants and Manufacturers, The Hispanic Society of America, Phi Lambda Beta (the Portuguese National Honor Fraternity), and Vanderbilt University. Individual participants from specified regional nuclei of interest met for introductory plenary sessions, during which the importance of Portuguese, the need for more people trained in it, and its interdisciplinary relevance were discussed in the national context by a series of distinguished specialists. The "national" group then separated into its constituent nuclei of interest (regional groups) for the seminars described in these transcripts, which are presented here in dialog form (with the exception of two in narrative form).  They represent the discussion of the following groups: (1) District of Columbia, Virginia, New Jersey, Pennsylvania; (2) Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee; (3) California, Oregon; (4) Texas, Louisiana; (5) Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska; (6) Massachusetts; (7) Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin; (8) Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Arizona; (9) New York; and (10) Rhode Island, Connecticut. A list of supplementary materials in Portuguese prefaces, and an index concludes the text transcriptions.   [More]  Descriptors: Equivalency Tests, Instructional Materials, Language Instruction, Language Programs

Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Rural Health Policy. (1993). Rural Health: The Story of Outreach. A Program of Cooperation in Health Care. Rural Health Outreach is a federal program of demonstration grants designed to encourage organizations to cooperate in delivering health care services to rural Americans. Thirteen programs utilizing innovative collaborations between state agencies, schools, nonprofit organizations, hospitals, volunteers, and the private sector are described a year into their work. On Virginia's Delmarva Peninsula, check-ups were provided to middle school students at school. In North Dakota, ambulance volunteers received training. A consortium of community mental health centers in 13 Oregon counties accessed help from specialists via satellite. Mobile prenatal care was provided in two northwestern Pennsylvania counties. Alaska Natives were trained to be physician assistants in their rural villages. In- and out-patient hospice services were established in Grundy County, Iowa. An Ohio school district provided mental health counseling to students and families at school or home. A family planning service was upgraded to provide full-time primary care service at two sites on Oahu (Hawaii). Financial counseling and aid was provided at public health sites throughout western Wisconsin. A new telecommunications network enabled physicians at Maine health centers to update their learning and consult one another. Native American culture was incorporated into mental health therapy addressing high alcoholism and school dropout rates in a New Mexico town. A northeast Oklahoma consortium coordinated and complemented the region's elderly services. Health education programs in schools combated teen pregnancy and a new van transported clients to clinics for prenatal care in two Alabama counties.   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Health Care, Agency Cooperation, Allied Health Occupations Education, Child Health

STERN, CAROLYN (1967). PRESCHOOL LANGUAGE PROJECT. SINCE THE HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUT IS IDENTIFIABLE IN THE PRIMARY GRADES, IT IS NECESSARY TO LAY THE GROUNDWORK FOR VOCATIONAL TRAINING MUCH EARLIER THAN HIGH SCHOOL. THIS IS THE RATIONALE FOR THE FIVE-YEAR PRESCHOOL LANGUAGE PROJECT FUNDED UNDER THE VOCATIONAL EDUCATION ACT. THE OBJECTIVES OF THIS PROJECT ARE TO PREPARE A SET OF LANGUAGE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS FOR USE IN A DAY CARE PROGRAM AND TO TRAIN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH PEOPLE. IN DEVELOPING THE LANGUAGE MATERIALS THE BASIC PREMISE IS THAT IT IS IMPORTANT FOR DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN TO DEVELOP STANDARD MIDDLE CLASS SPEECH. PROGRAMED MATERIALS ARE BEING PREPARED WHICH CAN BE PRESENTED BY TEACHER AIDES IN A FIFTEEN MINUTE SESSION EACH DAY. SPECIAL EVALUATIVE INSTRUMENTS HAVE BEEN DEVELOPED FOR THE PURPOSE OF ASSESSING THE VALUE OF THIS PROJECT. RESULTS OF THE PROGRAM WILL BE AVAILABLE IN ONE YEAR. THIS SPEECH WAS GIVEN AT A WORKING CONFERENCE ON RESEARCH AND ACTIVITY IN THE LANGUAGE ARTS FOR THE PRE-PRIMARY/PRIMARY CULTURALLY DIVERSE NON-ENGLISH SPEAKING CHILD IN ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO, JUNE 4-6, 1967.   [More]  Descriptors: Auditory Discrimination, Disadvantaged Youth, English (Second Language), Instructional Materials

Williams, Blanch S. (1977). American Indian Population – 55 Years of Age and Older: Geographic Distribution, 1970 (Part 1 of 2). Statistical Reports on Older Americans, March 1977. Presenting statistical data on the American Indian Population 55 years of age and older, this report presents the following tables: (1) Total and American Indian Resident Populations, All Ages and 55+, by State, 1970; (2) American Indian Resident Population, 55+ and Selected Age Groups, by State and Sex, 1970; (3) American Indian Resident population, Total and 55+ Age Group, in State Rank Order, 1970; (4) American Indians of All Ages, 55+, and 60+ by Region, and Urban-Rural Residence, 1970; (5) American Indians of All Ages and 65+ Living on Identified Reservations, in State Rank Order, 1970; (6) American Indian Population of All Ages and 65+ Living on Identified Reservations by State, 1970. Presenting a narrative summary, this paper reports that: the number of Indians 55 years of age and over reached about 89,000 in 1970 and made up 12% of the 761,000 persons in the Indian population; like the total, most older Indians lived in the 22 states with reservations identified for the 1970 census count (of the 213,770 Indians living on the 115 reservations, there were 11,853 Indians 65 years of age or older living on these reservations and accounting for 6% of all Indians on reservations); although Indians were highly concentrated in a few states (Arizona, California, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and North Carolina), they only made up 1% to 8% of the total persons in the 55+ age group in the 8 states with the largest older Indian population.   [More]  Descriptors: Age Differences, American Indian Reservations, American Indians, Census Figures

Swanson, Lee (1975). Systems Approach to Special Education: Undergraduate Student Teaching. This report provides a theoretical and practical use of a systems approach as it applies to student teacher training programs. Areas of primary focus include: (a) identification of preliminary competencies for student teachers and development of measures for predicting success in student teaching; (b) development both of behavioral objectives for training and of roles for cooperating teachers and supervisors; and (c) evaluation of student teaching performance and of the strengths and weaknesses of the various components of the special education undergraduate teacher training program. Part 1 describes the functions of the IPO (input, process, and output) systems approach. Part 2 discusses the systems approach as applied to student teacher training programs. Part 3 provides a paradigm for assessing preliminary competencies and predictive measures of success. Part 4 discusses the development of (a) process objectives by defining behavioral objectives for training, and (b) roles for training teams. Part 5 offers methods of evaluating the student teacher experience. Included in this section are the following: (a) student teacher conference form; (b) supervisor feedback form; (c) item analysis of performance; (d) description of the Flanders System; (e) the University of New Mexico Verbal Interaction Category; (f) description of the Blumberg System; (g) teaching profile form; (h) intern assessment form; and (i) teacher preparation evaluation scale. Appendixes include examples of evaluation formats.   [More]  Descriptors: Behavioral Objectives, Instructional Systems, Performance Criteria, Special Education

Mattingly, Richard C., Comp. (1962). Financial Assistance for College Students: Undergraduate. Bulletin, 1962, No. 11. OE-55027. [Part II], Office of Education, US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. This directory presents information relating to institutional financial aid programs which were active during the 1959-60 academic year. To collect information for this directory, over 2,100 copies of a questionnaire, "Survey of Institutional Financial Assistance to Undergraduate Students, 1959-60," were mailed to institutions of higher education, their branch campuses, and certain professional schools as listed in the Educational Directory, Part 3: Higher Education, 1959-60. The resulting information was supplied by officials of the 1,677 institutions listed herein. A table of gross figures is also included which summarizes, by States, institutional scholarships, undergraduate employment, undergraduate loans, and all loans made under the National Defense Student Loan Program. (Contains 5 footnotes, and 1 table.) [Due to its size, this volume has been processed as two separate parts. The first part (ED544000) includes the foreword through the descriptions of institutions and their student financial aid programs 1959-60, alphabetically by state up to and including New Jersey. The second part (ED544001) includes the remaining descriptions by state beginning with New Mexico through the index. The cover page and table of contents are repeated in the second and third parts. Best copy available has been provided.]   [More]  Descriptors: Higher Education, Scholarships, Campuses, Undergraduate Students

Trudeau, Elaine, Ed. (1973). Legal Provisions for Delivery of Educational Services on a Cooperative Basis to Handicapped Children. Presented alphabetically by state are summaries of the legal provisions for delivery of educational services to handicapped children on a cooperative basis among school districts as of June 1, 1973. It is noted that the total number of school districts has steadily declined during the last 40 years. Among organizational patterns reported to be used to deliver special education services on a regional basis for tuition contracting (allowing two or more small districts to combine resources for the operation of one program); state wide regional organization (New York's Board of Cooperative Educational Services is an example); regional education service centers providing for instructional materials distribution, consultative assistance, and inservice training to meet special education needs of local districts (Texas is an example); and voluntary association of school districts into cooperatives to deliver special services, select personnel, and regulate financing. Another alternative is given to be the special district which concentrates on the delivery of a specific education service. The legal base of regional programs is reported to vary from minimal guidelines (Alabama, Mississippi, and New Mexico) to detailed laws and regulations regarding administrative responsibility and the types of services and programs to be offered (such as in California, Indiana, and Minnesota).   [More]  Descriptors: Administrative Organization, Cooperative Programs, Exceptional Child Education, Handicapped Children

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