Bibliography: New Mexico (page 193 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Jack Kaemper, Pedro Castillo, Reid A. Luhman, Michael Shainline, Hector M. Serrano, Kathy Morse, J. Keith Austin, James C. Henderson, Patricia Frostman, and Albert Camarillo.

Morse, Kathy; Kaemper, Jack (1986). APS Chapter 1 Evaluation Report. 1985-1986. In 1985-86, reading was identified as the supplemental instructional area of the Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public Schools (APS) for funding under the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act, Chapter 1. In all, 39 elementary schools, 13 middle schools, and 4 high schools in the APS qualified for Chapter 1 services; 4,317 elementary school students (ESSs) received reading instruction (RI) and/or Cognitive Language Development instruction (CLDI), and 1,524 secondary students received RI. Data from 1,012 classroom teachers and 834 parents support the test results concerning the impact of Chapter 1 RI. As shown by the Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills, ESSs with 40 hours or more of Chapter 1 instruction gained skills at a greater rate than normal, except for grade 2. The Stanford Early School Achievement Test, Level II, showed greater than normal development of first graders with at least 30 hours of Chapter 1 CLDI. Student improvement in skill development–measured by the Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test–showed greater than normal growth in grades 6 through 12. Early Learning, computer-assisted instruction, and parent liaison services were also funded through Chapter 1. In addition to academic improvement, teachers and parents noted improvement in student attitudes and self-confidence. Fourteen data tables and three graphs are provided. Facts about eligible schools, staff allocation data, and the Chapter 1 planning form are appended. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Achievement Gains, Achievement Tests, Cognitive Development

Wax, Murray L.; Luhman, Reid A. (1974). Bilingual Classrooms in a Mexican-American Community. The Social Bases of Thinking and Speaking: A Study of Bilingual Chicano Children. Final Report, September 1974. The study examined the relation of language use and logical thought to social experience with both age and class held constant. The primary assumptions under study were: that the logic of symbolic grouping was highly sensitive to a child's experience with the objects to which that logic was applied; that the existence of diglossia in a bilingual community and/or relative shifts in language dominance might create a situation of language specialization by domain, particularly along the dimension of immediacy and distance; that the content of grouping (those final organizations produced by the logic) was a far more stable aspect of cognition than the logic used to construct it. The study was conducted in a fourth grade classroom in a bilingual school in Las Vegas, New Mexico. All of the children had Spanish surnames. Twenty-eight children took part in an extensive set of interviews in two languages. These interviews were designed to examine inter-relations of language use and the logic and content of symbolic grouping to social experience. Findings included: the logic of grouping was related to children's experience with the objects of grouping; town children had a much narrower and more specialized portion of their experience occurring in Spanish than did the rural children; the logic of grouping employed by these children was not related to school achievement with the one exception of the clustering of the tight-loose factor in Spanish with achievement test scores. Descriptors: Abstract Reasoning, Academic Achievement, Bilingual Students, Cognitive Processes

Shainline, Michael (1987). High School Dropouts 1986-87. District Report. The district dropout rate for the Albuquerque Public Schools (APS) for school year 1986-87 was 8.03 percent. Because the New Mexico State Department of Education changed the categories for reporting the reason why a student dropped out, it is difficult to compare this figure to the 1985-86 rate. At the end of every school year the State Department of Education requires that each diploma-granting high school in the state complete and submit a High School Dropout Report. Information provided in the report must include the following: (1) number of high school dropouts at each grade level, categorized by gender, ethnicity, and reason for dropping out; and (2) the 180-day membership at each grade level, categorized by gender and ethnicity. Analysis of the data includes the following: (1) the dropout rates by ethnic group were: White, 6.95 percent; Black, 8.47 percent; Hispanic, 9.61 percent; Native American, 9.68 percent; and Asian and others, 6.18 percent; (2) dropout rates for ninth through twelfth grades were 6.54 percent, 8.51 percent, 9.46 percent, and 7.72 percent, respectively; and (3) males dropped out at a rate of 7.99 percent, while females dropped out at a rate of 7.98 percent. Statistical data are reported on 7 tables and 6 graphs. Descriptors: American Indians, Asian Americans, Black Students, Dropout Characteristics

Henderson, James C.; And Others (1989). The Possible Dream. The "Possible Dream Scholarship Program" was developed at San Juan College (SJC) in New Mexico to encourage students to complete high school and attend college. Every 8th grader in San Juan County, regardless of their academic performance, receives a scholarship certificate of $125 to attend San Juan College and an invitation to enroll in the Possible Dream program. Two weeks later, their parents receive a letter from the college president explaining the tuition pre-payment program. Parents are asked to make $10 monthly payments to their child's scholarship account with the guarantee that when the 8th grader graduates from high school, he/she will have two full years of SJC tuition paid in full regardless of tuition increases that occur in the interim. The $125 scholarship that starts each student's account is funded by the San Juan College Foundation and U.S. West Communications, and the college board has agreed to freeze tuition at the rate in place when students joined the program. Now in its third cycle, the Possible Dream program has over 300 8th, 9th, and 10th grade participants, more than 50% of whom are minority students. Copies of the scholarship certificate, letters of invitation to join the program, and a guide distributed to participants of high school courses that help prepare for college are attached. Descriptors: College Bound Students, Community Colleges, High School Students, Incentives

Austin, J. Keith (1975). Initial Contact Approaches for Community Resource Development with Small Rural Communities. A field study was conducted to ascertain how leaders in 3 small rural New Mexico communities viewed the approaches of a community resource development (CRD) specialist during the critical initial phase of the CRD process. A log of approaches was kept by the specialist to record the significant approaches employed and the leader contacts made. Thirty-eight leaders were interviewed to determine opinions about various approaches. Twenty-five leaders approved of a CRD specialist working in the community; 1 did not; and 10 were undecided. Thirty-five leaders stated that the best way for a specialist to meet community leaders was via a face-to-face visit at their place of business. Eighteen wanted the specialist to work with them, while 14 wanted him to serve as an advisor only Twenty-nine thought that the best way for a specialist to get started was to carefully study the community before taking action. While 19 thought a specialist should live in the community, 30 recommended he work from 2 to 4 days a week in the community. It was recommended, therefore, that a new CRD specialist approach community leaders face-to-face; have a pre-talk prepared for the visitation; carefully study the community before attacking a project; and either live in the community or work there several days a week.   [More]  Descriptors: Case Studies, Community Development, Community Leaders, Community Resources

de los Santos, Gilberto (1975). An Operational Model for Bilingual Education. Over 1,100 community and junior colleges are currently enrolling students in the United States. In Arizona, California, Texas, New Mexico, and Colorado where the proportion of the population is about 20 percent Spanish speaking, there are about 210 two-year colleges. Studies indicate that 75 percent of all Mexican Americans attending post-secondary education are enrolled in community colleges. In 1971, there were 121,897 students enrolled in Texas community colleges; of these, 17,893 (14.6 percent) were Mexican Americans. Yet, few 2-year colleges report any significant progress in bilingual-bicultural education. The El Paso Community College is one of the few which has achieved some degree of success in bilingual-bicultural programs. It has pursued an instructional improvement phase which focuses on the development of a competency-based, learner-oriented model of instruction in which faculty development is essential. This paper discusses the learner-oriented model being developed at El Paso Community College.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Biculturalism, Bilingual Education, Community Colleges

Serrano, Hector M. (1972). The Mexican-American and Dramatic Literature. In the area of the arts, the Mexican American has discovered a rich cultural heritage which gives him a strong sense of pride and a deep feeling of satisfaction. A new interest in the literature of Mexico and the Southwestern states of Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and California has started the Chicano people reading classic and modern works written in Spanish. The area of dramatic arts has developed a special kind of theater as a result of this movement of ethnic interest: Teatro Chicano. This "teatro" is, in essence, what its name suggests: half Mexican and half Anglo American. Teatro Chicano was created as a direct reply to both Mexican and American writers of dramatic literature. Its ultimate goal is to give the Mexican American in the United States a new, accurate, and proud picture of himself. This thesis provides a short history of the theater and its singular progress in modern times. The treatment of the Mexican American in the theatrical literature of Mexico and by American dramatists such as Maxwell Anderson and Tennessee Williams is reviewed. Excerpts from the plays of Celestino Gorostiza, J. Humberto Robles, Maxwell Anderson, Tennessee Williams, and Luis Valdez are given. Descriptors: Characterization, Cultural Awareness, Drama, Hispanic American Literature

Weil, Kathryn; Frostman, Patricia (1987). Evaluation of Goal 1.4, 1986-87. The aim of Goal 1.4, an objective of the Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public Schools for 1986-87, is to make literacy a major focus for students identified as needing special assistance. It was planned to increase the scores on standardized tests for identified students. Those scoring below the 32nd percentile (40th NCE) on the reading vocabulary, reading comprehension, language mechanics, or language expression areas of the Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills in grades 5 and 8 became the focus of skills reinforcement instruction. A total of 1,360 students in grade 8 and 1,519 in grade 5 were identified in the fall of 1986. Gains by spring of 1987 for these students were computed and displayed in four tables. The average gains ranged from 5.2 to 11.6. That the average gain exceeded the target of Goal 1.4 and was statistically significant can be attributed to teachers targeting those students with lower scores and providing instruction in deficit areas.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Basic Skills, Educational Improvement, Educational Objectives

Diamond, Tom (1974). State Responsibilities for American Indians — Texas. The Tiguas of El Paso, Texas; the Coushattas of Louisiana; and the Tortugas of Las Cruces, New Mexico share a common background in that they represent American Indian tribes who, having lost their land base, have been abandoned by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and have experienced recent circumstances of poverty. Since Indian rights stem from their original ownership of land, the BIA generally takes the position that it will not assume responsibility for an Indian group without a land base. However, Title 25 of the U.S. Code (Section 334) states that equal treatment should be afforded all Indians regardless of place of residence. Due to recent efforts on the part of the Tiguas, the Texas State Legislature has assumed full legal responsibility for these El Paso Indians. While the Coushattas and the Tortugas have not been as successful, the Tiguas have provided a precedent and a blueprint for recognition of tribes without a land base. Recognition is a relationship between a unit of government (State or Federal) and a tribe, wherein the government provides services for the tribe which are not provided for the general public. A suggested blueprint for recognition involves procurement of: (1) an anthropologist to document tribal history; (2) an attorney to accept responsibility for coordinating the effort; and (3) an effective public relations man. Descriptors: American Indians, Equalization Aid, Federal Government, Land Acquisition

Castillo, Pedro, Ed.; Camarillo, Albert, Ed. (1973). Furia y Muerte: Los Bandidos Chicanos (Fury and Death: The Chicano Bandits). Monograph No. 4, Aztlan Publications. In the latter half of the nineteenth century five Chicano "bandidos" became prominant in Southwestern history. These "social bandits" were viewed by the dominant Anglo culture as outlaws and criminals; their people saw them as heroes and fighters for justice. Anglos had invaded Northern Mexico, disrupted the existing society, and established a foreign government upon the indigenous population. A new language, culture and economy were imposed and the Mexicans were dispossessed of lands and jobs, deprived and downtrodden. Each of the five "bandidos" was a revolutionary against the Anglos and each expressed his rebellion in a different way. Tiburcio Vasquez and Joaquin Murieta adapted banditry as a form of retribution and led gangs that terrorized Anglos in California. Elfego Baca of New Mexico was handy with a gun, but he chose to defend his people by working within the law, first as a U.S. marshal and later as a lawyer. Juan N. Cortina attempted to raise armies as he used armed forces in the Texas Rio Grande Valley to champion the cause of the oppressed Mexicans there. Gregorio Cortez killed a Texas sheriff who was trying to arrest him unjustly and, in his flight from the posses pursuing him, his courage, horsemanship and ability to embarrass the Anglos endeared him to his people. This anthology discusses the times and conditions producing each of these "social bandits," their individual deeds, and their ultimate ends. Descriptors: Biographies, Change Agents, Cultural Background, Folk Culture

IVINS, WILSON (1964). TEAM TEACHING IN SOUTHWESTERN SECONDARY SCHOOLS. A REPORT OF A SURVEY-STUDY ON TEAM TEACHING PROCEDURES IN PUBLIC SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN ARIZONA, COLORADO, AND NEW MEXICO IS PRESENTED. CURRENT PRACTICES WERE EVALUATED WHEN THERE WAS EVIDENCE OF A GENERAL AGREEMENT OR DISAGREEMENT WITH COMMONLY ACCEPTED PRINCIPLES OF SECONDARY EDUCATION. A POLL OF 440 SCHOOLS ENROLLING MORE THAN 150 STUDENTS SHOWED THAT 105 OF THE SCHOOLS WERE USING OR HAD USED TEAM TEACHING. PRINCIPALS OF THESE SCHOOLS WERE ASKED TO COMPLETE A CHECKLIST, THERE WERE EIGHTY-EIGHT RESPONDENTS. THE MAJOR FINDINGS INCLUDED–AT LEAST ONE-FOURTH OF ALL SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN THE AREA ENROLLING 150 OR MORE STUDENTS HAD USED OR WERE USING TEAM TEACHING, THERE WAS NO AGREEMENT ON A SINGLE DEFINITION OF TEAM TEACHING, THE PRIMARY OBJECTIVES OF TEAM TEACHING WERE BETTER USE OF TEACHERS AND IMPROVEMENT OF EDUCATIONAL QUALITY, MOST TEACHING TEAMS WERE IN THE BASIC SUBJECTS, THE ORGANIZATION OF TEAM TEACHING WAS USUALLY INFORMAL, STUDENT GROUPING WAS USED IN ONLY A MINORITY OF THE SCHOOLS, THE SCHOOLS USED A WIDE VARIETY AND GOOD SUPPLY OF SMALL GROUP INSTRUCTION, AND THERE HAD BEEN LITTLE SYSTEMATIC EFFORT TO COMPARE THE ACHIEVEMENT OF STUDENTS UNDER TEAM TEACHING WITH THOSE UNDER CONVENTIONAL TEACHING METHODS. REACTIONS OF PRINCIPALS TOWARD TEAM TEACHING RANGED FROM INDIFFERENCE TO ENTHUSIASM. THIS ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED IN THE "NASSP BULLETIN," MARCH 1964. Descriptors: Administrator Attitudes, Educational Improvement, Educational Media, Educational Objectives

Wilde, Judith Busch; And Others (1988). Survey Research: Why Respond?. The effects of several variables and incentives on response rates for surveys were studied in a population of instructors at state-supported colleges in New Mexico and employees at a national laboratory. A survey instrument was developed on the subject of response to surveys. Short and long versions were mailed under cover letters signed by individuals of varying academic status. One of six incentives was included, offering various combinations of a 50-cent reward, a stamped self-addressed envelope (SASE), and an entry for a $50.00 drawing. Out of a total of 426 questionnaires mailed, 197 usable questionnaires were returned, for an overall response rate of 46.95%. Length of survey, institution employing the respondent, and status of researcher had little influence on return rate.  The "in hand" monetary incentive had the highest return rate (63.9% with a SASE); no incentive had the lowest. Overall, the likelihood of return increased with increasing effort by the researchers and decreased with increasing respondent effort. The effort researchers put into developing an instrument may be more important than previously thought. Presentation style may encourage subjects to respond even when they are not particularly interested in the study topic. Five tables present response data. Descriptors: College Faculty, Data Collection, Evaluation Methods, Higher Education

Cyrino, Monica S. (1995). Club Hellas Presents: An Interdisciplinary Model for Team-Teaching Greek Civilization. A team-taught course on Greek civilization was designed to reach a broad audience of majors and non-majors at the University of New Mexico and has changed in response to faculty and student responses. The first version of the course covered Greek and Roman culture and presented a variety of guest lecturers, but student comments indicated that too much material was covered. The course was cut in half and transformed into an interdisciplinary Greek civilization course taught by two professors. The course was advertised through a widespread cross-listing to appeal to as many students as possible. Distributing flyers was effective in recruiting 140 to 170 students each time the course was offered every spring for 4 years. The current version of the course is divided into Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic Greece, with a heavy emphasis on the first two. The instructors rely mainly on primary sources to accompany the lectures every week. The instructors have tried a variety of strategies to provide small groups of students with access to instructors, since the department does not have enough money to hire discussion section leaders. The exams follow the tried-and-true essay format. Students unanimously agree on the effectiveness of using slides to accompany lectures. The success of the course has led to the petitioning of the university to add a new interdisciplinary major and minor in Classical Civilization. (The syllabus is attached.)   [More]  Descriptors: Ancient History, Course Descriptions, Greek Civilization, Greek Literature

Hambleton, Ronald K.; Rogers, H. Jane (1988). Detecting Biased Test Items: Comparison of the IRT Area and Mantel-Haenszel Methods. The agreement between item response theory-based and Mantel Haenszel (MH) methods in identifying biased items on tests was studied. Data came from item responses of four spaced samples of 1,000 examinees each–two samples of 1,000 Anglo-American and two samples of 1,000 Native American students taking the New Mexico High School Proficiency Examination in 1982. In addition, a matched group analysis was conducted using a third sample of 650 Native Americans and 650 Anglo Americans. The item characteristic curve area and the MH methods were used. The consistency of classification of items into biased and not-biased was in the 75 to 80% range for both methods. When the unreliability of item bias statistics was taken into account, both methods gave similar results. Discrepancies between methods were due to bias from intersections of item characteristic curves and the choice of interval over which item bias was defined. The Mantel-Haenszel method, with a minor modification or two, provides an acceptable approximation to the item response theory based methods. Five data tables and eight graphs show study results.   [More]  Descriptors: Comparative Analysis, High School Students, High Schools, Item Analysis

Nelson, Mary Carroll (1975). Michael Naranjo, The Story of an American Indian. Michael Naranjo is a Pueblo Indian who, after much searching, has become a talented sculptor. The son of a Baptist minister, Michael grew up observing nature and exploring the countryside around Santa Clara (New Mexico), his birthplace. When he was nine, his family moved to Taos, where he watched the ceremonies of the Taos Pueblos with fascination. On completing high school, he spent some restless years looking for a vocation, and was drafted into the army in 1967. Michael had been in Vietnam only two months when a grenade explosion left him sightless. Upon return to the U.S. and, through persistence and determination, he began to live an independent life. His feelings found an outlet in the wax figures he created, and soon he began to have them cast in bronze. An exhibit of his work was shown in Washington, D.C., and his sculpture "Eagle Dancer" was purchased by the president of the U.S. Michael has continued to receive awards and honors for his artwork, and today he is a well-known artist, a person whose determination to be independent despite his handicap has brought him success and personal fulfillment. This biography, intended for juveniles in grades five and up, is one of a series developed to help readers understand the great heritage of America's original citizens. Descriptors: Adolescent Literature, American Indians, Artists, Biographies

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Leave a Reply