Bibliography: New Mexico (page 191 of 235)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Breda Murphy Bova, Christine Marlow, Linda C. Lopez, Brian E. Clauser, Minorities Task Force on Women, Paul Villas, Penelope A. Hamlin, T. McKimmie, Elizabeth Armstrong, and John Zelazek.

McKimmie, T. (1994). Communicating with Faculty about the Collection: Citation Analysis and Beyond. The ownership/access debate is considered in the context of communication with library users. As part of a dialogue regarding library resources, a citation analysis was undertaken to assist in describing the collection at the New Mexico State University (NMSU) library to faculty researchers and other library users. References cited in faculty publications for the years 1988 to 1991 were analyzed to determine if they were owned by the library. The study sample consisted of 2,995 citations from 420 publications of 54 randomly selected faculty. Overall, 70.4% of the cited material was owned by the library. Cited journals were more likely to be owned (81.6%) than cited books (67.3%). Comparisons are made between types of citations and publications and of library holdings of cited material in the science, humanities, and social science areas. Five tables present (1) background data for population sample by faculty rank; (2) average numbers of publications and citations by academic group (January 1988 to September 1991); (3) comparison of publication and citation types per faculty member by academic group; (4) percentage of cited material in the library by type of citation; and (5) percentage of cited material in library by academic group and type of citation. (Contains 10 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Information, Books, Citation Analysis, Citations (References)

Armstrong, Elizabeth; Waszak, Cynthia (1990). Teenage Pregnancy and Too-Early Childbearing: Public Costs, Personal Consequences. Costs to the Federal Government and Selected States and Cities. 5th Edition. Since 1986, this annual cost study has provided a measure of what it costs the taxpayer each year to support families that began when the mother was a teenager. Three sets of public costs are estimated; these reflect: (1) how much the United States spends as a result of teenage childbearing in a given year; (2) the public cost over a projected 20-year period for a single family that began in 1989 by a teen birth; and (3) the cost of all teen families begun in 1989 over the following 20 years. The study has expanded to include estimates for five states and two cities that are representative of different regions around the country. The states–Vermont, Louisiana, Wisconsin, New Mexico, and Oregon–and the cities–Baltimore and St. Louis–reveal a broad range of costs for the locales they represent. Findings reveal a rise in teen birth rates and a greater than expected increase in the costs of teen pregnancy. The latter finding, ironically, reflects an encouraging development: an expansion of Medicaid coverage for low-income, pregnant women and children under 6 years of age. Introductory background information is followed by sections concerning 1989 estimated costs of teenage childbearing in the United States and in the five states and two cities, the case for teen pregnancy prevention, study methodology, and data sources. Descriptors: Birth, Birth Rate, Cost Estimates, Data Analysis

Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology, Washington, DC. (1988). Public Hearing: Report of the Proceedings of a Public Hearing of the Task Force on Women, Minorities and the Handicapped in Science and Technology (Atlanta, Georgia, March 2, 1988). The Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology was established by the U.S. Congress in Public Law 99-383 with the purpose of developing a long-range plan for broadening participation in science and engineering. Public hearings were held in Albuquerque (New Mexico), Atlanta (Georgia), Baltimore (Maryland), Boston (Massachusetts), Chicago (Illinois), Kansas City (Missouri), and Los Angeles (California), between Fall 1987 and Spring 1988. The final report of the task force was produced in December, 1989. This document is the written verbatim transcript of the public hearing held in Atlanta, Georgia, on March 2, 1988. Co-Chairs Mr. Jaime Oaxaca and Dr. Ann Reynolds conducted the hearing. Speakers at this hearing included: (1) Dr. Thomas W. Cole; (2) Dr. Etta Falconer; (3) Dr. James O. Mason; (4) Ms. Karen Darling; (5) Mr. Jack Sabater; (6) Ms. Chandra French; (7) Ms. Carolyn Chestnutt; (8) Ms. Polly Anna Harris; (9) Ms. Iris M. Carl; (10) Mr. James G. Breene; (11) Ms. B. K. Krenzer; (12) Dr. Joe Johnson; (13) Mr. William Shackelford; (14) Mr. Bill Linder-Scholer; (15) Ms. Debbie Baldridge; (16) Dr. Charles Meredith; (17) Dr. Isabella Ann Finkelstein; and (18) Dr. Melvin R. Webb. A written statement by Congressman J. Roy Rowland (Georgia) is included.   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Education, College Science, Disabilities, Elementary School Science

Lopez, Linda C. (1993). Smokeless Tobacco Consumption by Mexican-American University Students. A modified version of the Illinois Department of Public Health Tobacco Use Survey was used to assess smokeless tobacco consumption among students attending a state university in New Mexico. Respondents included 65 male and 83 female Mexican-Americans, as well as 59 male and 118 female Anglo-Americans. Ages ranged from 16 to 67; subgroup median ages were 23-25. Among Anglo-American female respondents, only three used chewing tobacco and one used snuff. No Mexican-American female used either form of smokeless tobacco. For males, use of smokeless tobacco was significantly greater among Anglo-Americans than among Mexican-Americans. Ten percent of Anglo males used chewing tobacco only, 8 percent used snuff only, and 15 percent used both. Seven percent of Hispanic males used chewing tobacco only, 3 percent used snuff only, and 7 percent used both. Both groups began using smokeless tobacco at an average age of 12-14 years. Over 90 percent of both groups believed that smokeless tobacco causes cancer. The results are compared to those of other studies of smokeless tobacco consumption among college and high school students.   [More]  Descriptors: Anglo Americans, College Students, Females, Higher Education

Siders, Bill (1995). Open Internet Access in a Structured School Environment: "Controlling Chat Lines During Study Hall.". At the New Mexico Military Institute (NMMI), both a four-year high school and a two-year junior college, students spend weekday evenings at their desks in mandatory study hall. The goal of NMMI for its campus network is to have a network tap on the desk of each cadet (as well as faculty and administrative staff). The Internet, now already implemented, is an open structure with little or no control placed on access, and this posed a problem at the Institute because of the wide variety of ages of cadets attending the school. This paper describes the types of accessible services, modes of access, and the challenge of programming a security front end which selectively restricts Internet use based on time of the day, day of the week, student class rank, grade point average (GPA), deportment, and other factors. The security system also makes it possible to restrict certain Internet privileges (Telnet and e-mail) on an individual basis. An Internet database (in POISE DMS format) holds all relevant data. Selected individuals may update the database on demand to change access restrictions.   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Information, Computer Mediated Communication, Computer Networks, Computer Terminals

Bova, Breda Murphy; Zelazek, John (1984). Motivational Orientations of Adult Basic Education Students. A study analyzed the reasons for adult participation in adult basic education (ABE) programs. During the study, researchers administered the Educational Participation Scale to 85 females and 72 males enrolled in ABE classes in New Mexico. Data from the returned questionnaires were examined to determine if any of the reasons for participation in ABE were related to age or sex. The researchers found that the factors "escape" and "stimulation" were of moderate importance to students between the ages of 18 and 45, of little importance to those in the midlife stage, and of above-moderate importance to those over the age of 55. While "professional advancement" and "personal growth" were of above-average importance to adults under the age of 50, a dramatic drop in ranking of scores for these factors occurred for those in later years. Based on these findings, the researchers recommended that ABE instructors make more use of small group instruction, mentoring programs, field trips, and community awareness programs. (A copy of the Educational Participation Scale is appended to this report.)   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Adult Students, Citizen Participation, Educational Strategies

Lopez, Linda C. (1992). Mexican-American and Anglo-American Parental Involvement with a Public Elementary School. Parents of children attending a K-3 elementary school in New Mexico were surveyed by mail to examine Mexican-American and Anglo-American parental involvement in the school. Of 264 parents contacted, 24 Anglo-Americans, 19 Mexican-Americans, 1 African-American, and 6 individuals who did not identify their ethnic affiliation completed a questionnaire. Data were reported only for Mexican-American and Anglo-American parents. Results indicate that Anglo-American parents rated their children above average significantly more frequently than did Mexican-American parents. The most frequent type of involvement in the school, reported by both Anglo-American and Mexican-American respondents with annual incomes over $10,000, was attending conferences with teachers. The second most frequent activity for these parents was attending school-sponsored events. The most popular activity for Mexican-American parents whose annual income was below $10,000 was participation in fund raising projects for the school. The most frequent types of involvement for Anglo-American parents with annual incomes below $10,000 were attending parent-teacher conferences and attending school-sponsored functions. The reasons for involvement differ between the two groups: Mexican-Americans get involved because their children wanted them to do so; whereas Anglo-Americans get involved because they "want to help." This study suggests that school personnel should encourage parental involvement since it is associated with improved student achievement.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Anglo Americans, Mail Surveys, Mexican Americans

Clauser, Brian E.; And Others (1991). Influence of the Criterion Variable on the Identification of Differentially Functioning Test Items Using the Mantel-Haenszel Statistic. Lab Report 198. This paper explores the effectiveness of the Mantel-Haenszel (MH) statistic in detecting differentially functioning test items when the internal criterion is varied. Using a data set from the 1982 statewide administration of a 150-item life skills examination (the New Mexico High School Proficiency Examination), a randomly selected sample of 1,000 Anglo-American and 1,000 Native American examinee item response sets was analyzed. The MH procedure was first applied to all of the items involved. The items were then categorized as belonging to one or more of four subtests based on the skills or knowledge needed to choose the correct response. Each subtest was then analyzed as a separate test, using the MH procedure. Three control subtests were also established using random assignment of test items, and they were analyzed using the MH procedure. Based on three runs of a MH computer program analyzing a total of 91 items, 22 items were identified as functioning differentially in the two examinee groups. The choice of criterion–total test score versus subtest score–had a substantial influence on the classification of items according to whether or not they were differentially functioning in the Anglo-American and Native American groups. Evidence for the convergence of judgmental and statistical procedures was found in the unusually high proportion of differentially functioning items within one of the classifications, and in the results of the reanalysis of this group of items. Two tables present data from the analyses. Descriptors: American Indians, Anglo Americans, Comparative Testing, High School Students

Moore, Nelle (1995). Persistence and Attrition at San Juan College. A project was undertaken at San Juan College, in New Mexico, to examine findings from several studies of student persistence and retention to shed light on factors influencing persistence at the college. The project took into account several definitions of persistence, including re-enrollment in the subsequent semester (semester to semester), re-enrollment the following fall semester (fall to fall), and persistence in relation to indicators of student educational goals such as full-time or degree seeking status. Results of the project indicated the following: (1) in 1991 and 1992, fall to fall persistence rates for part-time (PT) degree seeking students were 42% and 35%, respectively, and 59% and 46% for full-time (FT) degree-seeking students; (2) semester to semester persistence rates for fall 1993 were 79% for FT students and 45% for PT students, with higher fall to spring persistence rates than spring to fall rates; (3) in general, FT, regular students persisted at higher rates than part-time or provisional students; (4) 54% of students who left after one semester reported that they had achieved their educational goals; (5) common reasons for students not returning after the first semester included a lack of desired courses (15%), family responsibilities (14%), and job (12%) responsibilities; and (6) 28% of non-returners planned to re-enroll at the college within the following year.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Persistence, Community Colleges, Educational Attainment, Enrollment Influences

Villas, Paul; Cardenas, Manuel (1992). Problems from Alcohol Use in Two Hispanic Youth Populations. The purpose of this study was to compare differences in alcohol use and associated problems between two Hispanic youth groups. The subjects, from two different southwest sites, were self-identified Hispanics. Seventh and 12th graders from a northern New Mexico (NNM) (N=64) school and from a school on the U.S.-Mexico border (USM) (N=88) were selected. Central tendencies and Chi-Square statistics were used to analyze the data collected. The Adolescent Drinking Index (ADI) and the Personal Problems Checklist-Adolescent (PPCA) were instruments used to collect data. The study found significant differences between 7th and 12th graders in alcohol use and personal problems at both sites as well as between NNM 7th graders and USM 7th graders. There were not as many differences between NNM and USM for male and female students. The differences found, however, appear important. When looking at levels of alcohol use, both NNM (7th=65%, 12th=90%) and USM (7th=37%, 12th=88%) students showed a significant positive association.   [More]  Descriptors: Age Differences, Drinking, High Schools, Hispanic Americans

Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology, Washington, DC. (1988). Task Force on Women, Minorities and the Handicapped in Science and Technology: Public Hearing. Report of the Proceedings (Cambridge, Massachusetts, April 7, 1988). The Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology was established by the U.S. Congress in Public Law 99-383 with the purpose of developing a long-range plan for broadening participation in science and engineering. Public hearings were held in Albuquerque (New Mexico), Atlanta (Georgia), Baltimore (Maryland), Boston (Massachusetts), Chicago (Illinois), Kansas City (Missouri), and Los Angeles (California) between Fall 1987 and Spring 1988. The final report of the task force was produced in December, 1989. This document is the verbatim transcript of the public hearing. Co-Chairs Mr. Jaime Oaxaca and Dr. Ann Reynolds presided over the hearing. Following opening comments by Mr. Oaxaca, speakers at this hearing included: (1) Dr. Matina Horner; (2) Dr.  Norma Ware; (3) Dr. Elizabeth McKinsey; (4) Dr. Patsy Dickinson; (5) Ms. Vivian Li; (6) Dr. Sheila Widnall; (7) Dr. Kenneth M. Hoffman; (8) Dr. Shirley McBay; (9) Dr. Elizabeth Ivey; (10) Dr. Millie Dresselhaus; (11) Dr. Gilbert J. Lopez; (12) Ms. Joanne Sherwood; (13) Dr. Christine Jones; (14) Ms. Andrea Shlipalz; (15) Ms. Marybeth Ruskie; (16) Dr. Raymond Kurzweil; (17) Ms. Bernice Boyd; (18) Elmer Bartels; (19) Dr. Valerie Crane; (20) Dr. Harlee Strauss; (21) Dr. Lilli Hornig; (22) Dr. Margaret Rossiter; (23) Dr. Gerald Holton; (24) Dr. Janice Button-Shafer; (25) Ms. Karen Henry; and (26) Ms. Phyllis Dohenian.   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Education, College Science, Disabilities, Elementary School Science

Sargent, Nanette (1970). Library Service to the American Indians in the Southwest. Information about library service to American Indians is poorly documented and difficult to obtain because there has been so little of it. There have been no libraries for Indians because there were no books in Indian languages, and no one to read those in the English language. The governmental programs to educate Indian children have not failed entirely, but have only begun to meet the needs of all children. To narrow the search for library service to Indians requires a close study of the entire area of Indian education. There is a whole plethora of material on the subject of education, but little on the role played by libraries. To find out what has been done in the way of library service to Indians, particularly in the Southwest, letters were written to the state librarians of New Mexico, Arizona, Kansas, California and Colorado, and others concerned with Indian affairs. The information on existing services and programs which resulted from these inquiries is presented as the major portion of this paper.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Bookmobiles, Education, Learning Resources Centers

Lopez, Linda C.; Hamlin, Penelope A. (1993). Smokeless Tobacco Consumption by Mexican-American High School Students. A survey of 208 female and 191 male students attending a public high school in southwestern New Mexico assessed the extent of student use of smokeless tobacco products. The sample included 179 Mexican-American and 26 Anglo-American females, as well as 152 Mexican-American and 26 Anglo-American males. The average age of both female and male subsamples was 15 years. None of the Anglo-American female respondents was a regular user of smokeless tobacco. One Mexican-American female identified herself as a user of chewing tobacco. Eight percent of male students used chewing tobacco, and five percent of males dipped snuff. Seven percent of Mexican-American males and 34 percent of Anglo-American males used smokeless tobacco. The frequency of smokeless tobacco use among Anglo-American males was significantly higher than among Mexican-American males. Both groups had begun using smokeless tobacco at an average age of 9-11. The results are compared to those of other southwestern studies of smokeless tobacco use.   [More]  Descriptors: Adolescents, Anglo Americans, Females, High School Students

Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology, Washington, DC. (1988). Task Force on Women, Minorities and the Handicapped in Science and Technology: Public Hearing. Report of the Proceedings (Carson, California, January 14, 1988). The Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology was established by the U.S. Congress in Public Law 99-383 with the purpose of developing a long-range plan for broadening participation in science and engineering. Public hearings were held in Albuquerque (New Mexico), Atlanta (Georgia), Baltimore (Maryland), Boston (Massachusetts), Chicago (Illinois), Kansas City (Missouri), and Los Angeles (California) between Fall 1987 and Spring 1988. The final report of the task force was produced in December, 1989. This document is the verbatim transcript of the public hearing. Co-Chair Dr. Ann Reynolds presided over the hearing. Following opening comments by the chair, speakers at this hearing included: (1) Dr. John Burnell; (2) Dr. James M Rosser; (3) Dr.  Stuart E. Gothold; (4) Mr. Raul Alvarado Jr.; (5) Dr. Dorothy Hudig; (6) Dr. Eugene H. Cota-Robles; (7) Mr. Jesse Rubalcaba; (8) Mr. Ralph Casarez and Mr. Robert Cole; (9) Ms. Sevilla Weatherford; (10) Dr. Nancy Kreinberg; (11) Dr. Helga Christofferson; (12) Dr. Raymond B. Landis; (13) Ms. Eva W. Bein; (14) Ms. Nancy Guitterez; and (15) Ms. Frances Manion.   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Education, College Science, Disabilities, Elementary School Science

Marlow, Christine (1988). Developing Services for Employed Women: Building on Existing Networks. The employed woman often finds herself struggling to maintain multiple roles as wife, mother, and worker. Programs serving employed women's needs are a limited commodity in the United States, particularly in rural areas with a relative absence of human services. One approach to program planning in this area is through the examination of the structure of women's natural or informal helping networks. A survey was conducted of 250 female clerical workers in Las Cruces, New Mexico, to study their social support networks. Subjects were 41% Hispanic and 57% Anglo. They had a mean age of 34. Seventy percent lived with their husbands or mates, and 50% had children under the age of 18 at home. When they needed help coping, 76% of married women turned to their husbands; 44% of the total sample turned to family, 55% to friends, 36% to coworkers, 15% to supervisors, and 13% to priests, curanderos, physicians, or counselors. These women would like to turn more to professional counselors, and less to other family, children, and friends, but the discrepancies between actual and desired supports were not large. Anglo and Hispanic women showed few differences in their patterns of use of support persons. The development of formal services for these women must take advantage of existing support systems. This report contains 16 references. Descriptors: Anglo Americans, Clerical Workers, Coping, Employed Women

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